Bag of feature models - Discriminative

Report
790-133
Recognizing People, Objects, & Actions
Tamara Berg
Object Recognition – BoF models
1
Topic Presentations
• Hopefully you have met your topic presentations group
members?
• Group 1 – see me to run through slides this week or
Monday at the latest (I’m traveling Thurs/Friday). Send
me links to 2-3 papers for the class to read.
• Sign up for class google group (790-133). To find the
group go to groups.google.com and search for 790-133
(sorted by date). Use this to post/answer questions
related to the class.
2
Bag-of-features models
Object
Bag of
‘features’
3
source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Exchangeability
• De Finetti Theorem of exchangeability (bag of
words theorem): the joint probability
distribution underlying the data is invariant to
permutation.
p(x1, x 2 ,..., x N ) =
ò
æ N
ö
p(q )çÕ p(x i | q )÷dq
è i=1
ø
4
Origin 2: Bag-of-words models
• Orderless document representation: frequencies of words from a
dictionary Salton & McGill (1983)
US Presidential Speeches Tag Cloud
http://chir.ag/phernalia/preztags/
5
source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Bag of words for text
 Represent documents as a “bags of words”
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Example
• Doc1 = “the quick brown fox jumped”
• Doc2 = “brown quick jumped fox the”
Would a bag of words model represent these
two documents differently?
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Bag of words for images
 Represent images as a “bag of features”
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Bag of features: outline
1. Extract features
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source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Bag of features: outline
1. Extract features
2. Learn “visual vocabulary”
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source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Bag of features: outline
1. Extract features
2. Learn “visual vocabulary”
3. Represent images by frequencies of
“visual words”
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source: Svetlana Lazebnik
2. Learning the visual vocabulary
…
Clustering
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Slide credit: Josef Sivic
2. Learning the visual vocabulary
Visual vocabulary
…
Clustering
13
Slide credit: Josef Sivic
K-means clustering (reminder)
•
Want to minimize sum of squared Euclidean
distances between points xi and their nearest
cluster centers mk
D(X ,M ) 


( xi  m k )
2
cluster k point i in
cluster k
Algorithm:
• Randomly initialize K cluster centers
• Iterate until convergence:
• Assign each data point to the nearest center
• Recompute each cluster center as the mean of all points assigned
to it
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source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Example visual vocabulary
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Fei-Fei et al. 2005
Image Representation
• For a query image
Extract features
Visual vocabulary
x
x
x
x
x
Associate each
feature with the
nearest cluster
center (visual word)
x
x
x
x
x
Accumulate visual
word frequencies
over the image
frequency
3. Image representation
…..
codewords
17
source: Svetlana Lazebnik
frequency
4. Image classification
CAR
…..
codewords
Given the bag-of-features representations of images from different
classes, how do we learn a model for distinguishing them?
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source: Svetlana Lazebnik
Image Categorization
What is this?
Choose from many categories
helicopter
Image Categorization
SVM/NB
Csurka et al (Caltech 4/7)
What is this?
Choose from many categories
Nearest Neighbor
Berg et al (Caltech 101)
Kernel + SVM
Grauman et al (Caltech 101)
Multiple Kernel Learning + SVMs
Varma et al (Caltech 101)
…
Visual Categorization with Bags of Keypoints
Gabriella Csurka, Christopher R. Dance, Lixin Fan, Jutta Willamowski, Cédric Bray
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Data
• Images in 7 classes: faces, buildings, trees,
cars, phones, bikes, books
• Caltech 4 dataset: faces, airplanes, cars (rear
and side), motorbikes, background
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Method
Steps:
– Detect and describe image patches.
– Assign patch descriptors to a set of predetermined
clusters (a visual vocabulary).
– Construct a bag of keypoints, which counts the
number of patches assigned to each cluster.
– Apply a classifier (SVM or Naïve Bayes), treating
the bag of keypoints as the feature vector
– Determine which category or categories to assign
to the image.
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Bag-of-Keypoints Approach
Interesting Point
Detection
Key Patch
Extraction
Feature
Descriptors
Bag of Keypoints
Multi-class
Classifier
  0 .1 


  0 .5 
.



.



.


  1 .5 


Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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SIFT Descriptors
Interesting Point
Detection
Key Patch
Extraction
Feature
Descriptors
Bag of Keypoints
Multi-class
Classifier
  0 .1 


  0 .5 
.



.



.


  1 .5 


Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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Bag of Keypoints (1)
Interesting Point
Detection
Key Patch
Extraction
Feature
Descriptors
Bag of Keypoints
Multi-class
Classifier
• Construction of a vocabulary
– Kmeans clustering  find “centroids”
(on all the descriptors we find from all the training images)
– Define a “vocabulary” as a set of “centroids”, where every centroid
represents a “word”.
Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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Bag of Keypoints (2)
Interesting Point
Detection
Key Patch
Extraction
Feature
Descriptors
Bag of Keypoints
Multi-class
Classifier
• Histogram
– Counts the number of occurrences of different visual words in each image
Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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Multi-class Classifier
Interesting Point
Detection
Key Patch
Extraction
Feature
Descriptors
Bag of Keypoints
Multi-class
Classifier
• In this paper, classification is based on conventional machine learning
approaches
– Support Vector Machine (SVM)
– Naïve Bayes
Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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SVM
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Reminder: Linear SVM
x2
Margin
g (x)  w x  b
T
x+
x+
m inim ize
1
w
2
2
s.t.
x-
yi ( w x i  b )  1
T
Support Vectors
x1
Slide 30 of 113
Slide credit: Jinwei Gu
Nonlinear SVMs: The Kernel Trick

With this mapping, our discriminant function becomes:
g (x)  w  (x)  b 
T

 i ( x i )  ( x )  b
T
iSV

No need to know this mapping explicitly, because we only use the
dot product of feature vectors in both the training and test.

A kernel function is defined as a function that corresponds to a dot
product of two feature vectors in some expanded feature space:
K (xi , x j )   (xi )  (x j )
T
31
Slide credit: Jinwei Gu
Nonlinear SVMs: The Kernel Trick

Examples of commonly-used kernel functions:
K (xi , x j )  xi x j
T

Linear kernel:

Polynomial kernel:

Gaussian (Radial-Basis Function (RBF) ) kernel:
K ( x i , x j )  (1  x i x j )
K ( x i , x j )  exp( 

T
xi  x j
2
2
p
2
)
Sigmoid:
K ( x i , x j )  tan h (  0 x i x j   1 )
T
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Slide credit: Jinwei Gu
SVM for image classification
• Train k binary 1-vs-all SVMs (one per class)
• For a test instance, evaluate with each
classifier
• Assign the instance to the class with the
largest SVM output
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Naïve Bayes
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Naïve Bayes Model
C
C – Class
F - Features
F1
F2
Fn
P(C,F1,F2,...Fn ) = P(C)Õ P(Fi | C)
i
We only specify (parameters):
P(C) prior over class labels
P(Fi | C) how each feature depends on the class
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Example:
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Slide from Dan Klein
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Slide from Dan Klein
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Slide from Dan Klein
Percentage of
documents in
training set labeled
as spam/ham
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Slide from Dan Klein
In the documents labeled
as spam, occurrence
percentage of each word
(e.g. # times “the”
occurred/# total words).
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Slide from Dan Klein
In the documents labeled
as ham, occurrence
percentage of each word
(e.g. # times “the”
occurred/# total words).
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Slide from Dan Klein
Classification
The class that maximizes:
P(C,W1,...W n ) = P(C)Õ P(W i | C)
i
= argmax P(c)Õ P(W i | c)
c ÎC
i
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Classification
• In practice
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Classification
• In practice
– Multiplying lots of small probabilities can result in
floating point underflow
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Classification
• In practice
– Multiplying lots of small probabilities can result in
floating point underflow
– Since log(xy) = log(x) + log(y), we can sum log
probabilities instead of multiplying probabilities.
46
Classification
• In practice
– Multiplying lots of small probabilities can result in
floating point underflow
– Since log(xy) = log(x) + log(y), we can sum log
probabilities instead of multiplying probabilities.
– Since log is a monotonic function, the class with
the highest score does not change.
47
Classification
• In practice
– Multiplying lots of small probabilities can result in
floating point underflow
– Since log(xy) = log(x) + log(y), we can sum log
probabilities instead of multiplying probabilities.
– Since log is a monotonic function, the class with
the highest score does not change.
– So, what we usually compute in practice is:
c map
é
ù
= arg max log P(c)+å log P(Wi |c)
êë
úû
i
c ÎC
48
Naïve Bayes on images
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Naïve Bayes
C
C – Class
F - Features
F1
F2
Fn
P(C,F1,F2,...Fn ) = P(C)Õ P(Fi | C)
i
We only specify (parameters):
P(C) prior over class labels
P(Fi | C) how each feature depends on the class
50
Naive Bayes Parameters
Problem: Categorize images as one of k object
classes using Naïve Bayes classifier:
– Classes: object categories (face, car, bicycle, etc)
– Features – Images represented as a histogram of
visual words. Fi are visual words.
P(C) treated as uniform.
P(Fi | C) learned from training data – images labeled
with category. Probability of a visual word given
an image category.
51
Multi-class classifier –
Naïve Bayes (1)
•
Let V = {vi}, i = 1,…,N, be a visual vocabulary, in which each vi represents a visual
word (cluster centers) from the feature space.
•
A set of labeled images I = {Ii } .
•
Denote Cj to represent our Classes, where j = 1,..,M
•
N(t,i) = number of times vi occurs in image Ii
•
Compute P(Cj|Ii):
Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
52
Multi-class Classifier –
Naïve Bayes (2)
•
Goal - Find maximum probability class Cj:
•
In order to avoid zero probability, use Laplace smoothing:
Slide credit: Yun-hsueh Liu
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Results
Results
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Results
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Results
Results on Dataset 2
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Results
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Results
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Results
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Thoughts?
• Pros?
• Cons?
Related BoF models
pLSA, LDA, …
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pLSA
document
topic
word
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pLSA
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pLSA on images
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Discovering objects and their location
in images
Josef Sivic, Bryan C. Russell, Alexei A. Efros, Andrew Zisserman,
William T. Freeman
Documents – Images
Words – visual words (vector quantized SIFT descriptors)
Topics – object categories
Images are modeled as a mixture of topics (objects).
68
Goals
They investigate three areas:
– (i) topic discovery, where categories are
discovered by pLSA clustering on all available
images.
– (ii) classification of unseen images, where topics
corresponding to object categories are learnt on
one set of images, and then used to determine
the object categories present in another set.
– (iii) object detection, where you want to
determine the location and approximate
segmentation of object(s) in each image.
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(i) Topic Discovery
Most likely words for 4 learnt topics (face, motorbike, airplane, car)
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(ii) Image Classification
Confusion table for unseen test images against pLSA trained on
images containing four object categories, but no background
images.
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(ii) Image Classification
Confusion table for unseen test images against pLSA trained on
images containing four object categories, and background images.
Performance is not quite as good.
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(iii) Topic Segmentation
P(zk | wi ,d j ) > 0.8
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(iii) Topic Segmentation
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(iii) Topic Segmentation
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