Parallelism standard - Livaudais English Classroom

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Parallelism
What is Parallelism
Definition
Why Use it
Parallel structure (also called
parallelism) is the repetition
of a chosen grammatical form
within a sentence. By making
each compared item or idea
in your sentence follow the
same grammatical pattern,
you create a parallel
construction
 Parallel structure adds
both clout and clarity
to your writing. When
you use parallel
structure, you increase
the readability of your
writing by creating
word patterns readers
can follow easily
Effects of Parallelism
 It makes a good impression on your readers,
especially experienced readers and writers, because
the use of parallel structure is always obvious.
 It gives organization to your writing.
 It emphasizes ideas and draws attention to ideas
 The reader can quickly process information and see
relationships between ideas. It guides readers
through your ideas.
Creating Parallel Structure
All items in a series should have the same structure to help the
reader quickly process information.
If one element is an adjective, then all elements should be
adjectives; if one element is a noun, then all elements should be
nouns; if one element is a verb, then all elements should be
verbs, and so forth. Take a look at the examples below:
1. The children are energetic and noisy. = adjective + adjective
2. She bought a skirt and a blouse. = noun + noun
3. He walked slowly and confidently to the witness stand. =
adverb + adverb
When items in a series do not have the same form, the sentence
will sound awkward and out of balance.
Comparison of Usage
Not parallel structure
Parallel Structure
 I would rather go to a different
 I would rather go to a different
restaurant than waiting in this
long line.
 He thought that he would rather
pay for the ticket than filing a
legal co
 Taking a fieldtrip to a museum
can give you many benefits: to
learn the educational concept in
a hands-on method, to engage
your classmates in a more
informal setting, and you can
make a connection between the
community and the classroom.
restaurant than wait in this long
line.
 He thought that he would rather
pay for the ticket than file a leg
 Taking a fieldtrip to a museum
can give you the benefits of
learning the educational
concept in a hands-on method,
engaging your classmates in a
more informal setting, and
making a connection between
the community and the
classroom.
 Revising to create parallel
structure...
 An easy way to check for parallel
structure in a piece of writing,
whether that structure is between
words, phrases, clauses, or
paragraphs in an essay, is to
think of the core idea in the
structure as the trunk of a tree,
and each parallel item as a
branch off that trunk; once you
find the trunk, follow the trunk
line to each of the branches
directly, checking to ensure that
the trunk connects strongly (and
correctly) to each branch as
illustrated in the diagram below:
Examples
 See below how parallelism was used in these two
speeches:
 "Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill,
that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any
hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure
the survival and the success of liberty. " - John F.
Kennedy
 "Today's students can put dope in their veins or hope in
their brains. If they can conceive it and believe it, they
can achieve it. They must know it is not their aptitude but
their attitude that will determine their altitude. " Reverend Jesse Jackson
Practice
 Parallelism Practice:
 http://aliscot.com/bigdog/parallel_exercise.htm

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