generations powerpoint

Report
Generational Characteristics of
Our Students and Ourselves
Presented by David J. Sorrells, Ph.D.
Coordinator of Assessment
QEP Chair
• The Silent Generation
• Also called Traditionalists, Seniors, The Greatest Generation
• Lived through the Great Depression and World War II
• Born between 1922 and 1943
• Baby Boomers
• Also called the Me Generation, the Sandwich Generation
• Born between 1943 and 1960
• Generation X
• Sometimes called the Baby Bust Generation
• Born between 1960 and 1980
• Millennials
• Also called the Echos, the Nexters, and Generation Y
• Born between 1980 and 2000
• Grew up during the Depression
and served in World War II
• Believe in sacrifice for the
Greater Good
• Often have one immigrant
parent or multiple immigrant
grandparents
• Maintain traditional values
• Have respect for the wisdom
of elders
• Prefer a “hands-on” approach
or “real” reality
• Born between 1943 and
1960
• TV Generation
• Materialistic
• “Me” focus
• Responsible for social
changes
• Two household workers
• Women in the work
force: Superwoman
• “Live to Work” - YUPPIES
• Born between 1960 and
1980
• Often children of divorce and
non-traditional family units
• Latchkey kids
• Raised on electronic media
• Use of newest technology is a
given
• Function well alone
• Tend to be pessimistic and
skeptical of authority and
institutions
• Have short attention spans
• “Work to Live” - GUPPIES
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Sometimes younger siblings of Gen-Xers
Benefitted from parents’ later life success
Often have at least one immigrant parent
Are racially and ethnically diverse
Identify with parents’
values
Gravitate toward
group activities
Believe it’s cool to be
smart
New technology is a
given
Short attention spans
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Millennials
Gen-X
Baby Boomers
Silent Generation
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• Workers from the Silent Generation are characterized by
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Loyalty to the employer
Hard work
Dependability
Personal touch approach
Obedience over individualism
No hurry/ long patience
• Boomer workers are characterized by
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Belief in paying dues to get ahead
Sense of duty
Belief in sacrifice for success
Loyalty to employer
Salary contributes to satisfaction
Self satisfaction in job is paramount, but measured in different ways
• Generation X workers are characterized by
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Technology skills
Entrepreneurial spirit
Mobility and flexibility at work
Focus on personal professional growth over employer interests
Perceived lack of loyalty
Want balance of work and home life
Need immediate feedback
Will balance end result with desire for quick resolution
• Millennial workers are characterized by
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Technology skills
Expectation of diversity
Expectation of rapid results
Flexible schedules
Want balance of work and home life
Need for independence in decision making
Desire for challenge and growth
Expect immediate feedback
• Lecture classes
• Reading assignments in books. We
generally prefer to print out long
documents rather than read them on
screen
• Pen and paper note taking
• Working individually rather than in
groups
• Quiet study or work time
• Face-to-face interaction with others
• Acceptance of professional authority
• Limited access to our time as faculty
• Expectation that our decisions will be
accepted without challenge
• Consumer orientation
• Assumption that institutions are corrupt and untrustworthy
• Multi-tasking
• Doing several things at once
• Learning from several different sources
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Pragmatic approach to problem solving
Questioning the veracity of information
Entertainment orientation
Instant gratification
Short event horizon
Expectations of excellence
Awareness of personal safety
No civility
1. The Beatles and the
British Invasion
2. Technology and
electronic advances
3. Mr. Mom’s influence
4. Parenting
5. The New Math
6. MTV
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Technology
Parenting
• Often had children later or
had two “sets” of children
• Had Millennial children
when they were more
established in their careers
and were more financially
stable
• May have felt that they
failed with the older
children
• Media told them over and over to
protect their children
• Media covered every incident of
harm to children
• Government passed child safety
laws
• School told them that they needed to be involved in their
children’s schools
• Child-rearing books told them to be involved with their kids at
all levels
And if you don’t do all these things, then you are a . . .
BAD PARENT!
1. Millennials
2. Gen-Xers
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Research done by Molly Epstein at Emory University
(2007) reveals interesting differences:
Comfortable speaking with professors:
• 60% of Millennials
• < 40% of Gen Xers
1. Millennials
2. Gen-Xers
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1. Millennials
2. Gen-Xers
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Comfortable asking for special treatment:
• 60% of Millennials
• 29% of Gen Xers
Believe that authority figures should set
and enforce rules:
• 70% Millennials
• 40% Gen Xers
1. Millennials
2. Gen-Xers
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1. Millennials
2. Gen-Xers
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Feel comfortable challenging professors
on grades:
• 60% of Millennials
• 35% of Gen Xers
Want a clearly structured academic path:
• 80% of Millennials
• 60% of Gen Xers
• Articulate all desired outcomes
• Establish clear expectations;
communicate them early and often
• Maintain technological sophistication
• Offer opportunities for personal
involvement
• Design “real world” assignments
• End the “sage on the stage”
approach
• Provide transparency and clear
communication
• Address multiple learning options
• Use meaningful assessments: require
demonstration rather than the
ability to memorize
From Generation Next Come to College: 2006 Updates and Emerging Issues by Mark L. Taylor
• Carlson, Scott. “The Net Generation Goes to College.”
• Epstein, Molly. (2007).
• Mouchayleh, Terry Stewart. (2009). “The More Things Change,
The More They Stay the Same: Working With Generational
Issues in our Students.”
• ---. (2007). “Generational Differences Among Higher Education
Faculty.”
• Taylor, Mark L. (2006). “Generation Next Come to College:
2006 Updates and Emerging Issues.”

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