Marzano Design Questions 4, 8,9 and Domains 3 and 4

Report
Marzano Design Questions
4, 8,9 and
Domains 3 and 4
3rd/4th Quarter Observations
Quarter
1st Quarter
2nd Quarter
3rd Quarter and
4th Quarter
Design
Question/Domain
Design Questions 1,6,7
and Domain 2
Design Questions 2,3,
and 5
Design Questions 4,8,
and 9
Deeper
Connections
with
all
Design
Questions and Complete
Domains 2-4
See TLE Guidelines page 6
3rd/4th Quarter ObservationsTeacher Framework
3rd/4th Quarter ObservationsTeacher Framework
x
Because the
district did not use
Growth Plans this
year, this section
will not be
observed.
3rd/4th Quarter Observations- NonClassroom Framework
x
Because the district did
not use Growth Plans
this year, this section
will not be observed.
3rd Quarter Observation
Peer Observations
 Each teacher must conduct one peer observation by the
end of the 3rd quarter
 15-30 minutes in length
 Teachers work together to schedule an observation time
 Peers will only observe specific elements
 Actionable feedback provided
 Results will not be used in final evaluation scores
3rd Quarter Observation
Peer Observations
 Only the teacher conducting the observation and the
teacher being observed can view the observation
 Administrators do not have access to peer observations
 Peer observations must maintain a high level of
confidentiality
3rd Quarter Observation
Peer Observations- Library Media Specialists
ONLY
 For teachers who do not have a “peer” in their
building, the district will conduct a pilot program
with the LMS Department to find an alternative
possibility.
 For the 2013-2014 school year, the LMS has the
option to travel to a school within their feeder
pattern to conduct an observation.
3rd Quarter Observation
Peer Observations- Library Media Specialists
ONLY
 The LMS teacher must give 72-hours notice to their
building principal regarding the date and time they
will be out of the building.
 The LMS teacher may only leave their building
during a time not designated for library instruction.
(unless given permission by the building principal)
3rd Quarter Observation
Peer Observations- Library Media Specialists
ONLY
 Within 72 hours of the observation, the LMS must
provide Kathleen Lienke and Alicia Currin-Moore
with the name of the LMS that they are observing,
the site, and observation date.
 The total time away from the school site should be
no more than 1.5 hours.
 Because this is optional, no mileage will be paid.
3rd/4th Quarter Observations
Informal-unannounced
 5-15 minutes in length
 Teacher is not informed
that the observation will
occur
Formal-announced
 Minimum 30 minutes
in length
 Pre-Conference
 Post-Conference
 Actionable feedback
provided
 Results used in final
evaluation scores
 Results will be used in
final evaluation scores
 Written, actionable,
and timely feedback
provided to the
teacher
See TLE Guidelines pg. 11
3rd/4th Quarter Formal
Observations
Steps to a Formal Observation
1)
Pre-Conference
a.
The teacher completes the short version of the Pre-Conference Form B in
iObservation
b.
Meet with observer to discuss the lesson
2)
Formal Observation
3)
Post-Conference
a.
The teacher completes the short version of the Post-Conference Form A
in iObservation
b.
Meet with observer to reflect on the observed lesson
Pre-conference Form B-sample
See TLE Guidelines pg. 30
Post-conference Form A-sample
See TLE Guidelines pg. 32
3rd/4th Quarter Observations
Q and A
Q: When is the deadline to complete both the informal and
formal observation?
A: As per contract, the final day to complete both the
informal and formal observation is the Friday before the
first day of state testing. (April 11, 2014)
Q:Can any Design Question be observed during the 3rd/4th
quarter observations?
A: Yes, during this round of observations, Design
Questions 4, 8 and 9 and Domains 2-4 must be observed.
Since Design Questions 1 and 6 should be evident in
every lesson, they should be observed as well. Any
other Design Question can be observed as appropriate.
3rd/4th Quarter Observations
Q and A
Q: Must the observations be completed in a specific order?
A: Yes. The informal, unannounced observation
must occur first, then the formal observation.
Q: Is it ok if an observer does not see all of the required
Design Questions/elements during the informal
unannounced observation?
A: Yes. It is unlikely that in a 5-15 minute
unannounced observation an observer will see more
than 2-4 elements.
3rd/4th Quarter Observations
Q and A
Q: Can you observe Design Question 4 during an informal,
unannounced observation?
A: Probably not. Because DQ 4 is more complex, it may not
be seen in 5-15 minutes.
Q: How do teachers conduct peer observations?
A: The same way administrators conduct observations in
iObservation. The teacher will click on “ Observations” then
“Conduct” then find the teacher’s name and select the
correct form.
Q: What should teachers observe during peer observations?
A: Elements within DQ 1, 5, 6, and 7 would likely be the
most straightforward elements to observe.
Design Question 4
Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
It’s Video
Time!
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DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
 Student-driven
 Teachers shift roles- from knowledge
deliver to guide and resource provider
 Teachers design opportunities for students
to:
 Ask questions
 Generate hypotheses and predictions
 Investigate through testing or research
 Analyze and communicate results
Why use DQ 4?
23% Gain in
Student
Achievement
Aligns with
Common
Core
Systematic
Problem
Solving
Real-world
Application
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 21- Organizing Students for
Cognitively Complex Tasks
Strategies
 Cooperative Learning Groups
 Journal Writing
 Student Selected Research Projects
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
# 21- Organizing Students for Cognitively Complex
Tasks
It’s Video
Time!
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DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 22- Engaging students in
cognitively complex tasks
involving hypothesis generation
and testing
Strategy
 Experimental-Inquiry Tasks- make
predictions, test the predictions, and
examine the results.
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 22- Engaging students in
cognitively complex tasks
involving hypothesis generation
and testing
Strategy
 Problem-solving Tasks- set a goal, identify
obstacles, find solutions, examine results
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 22- Engaging students in
cognitively complex tasks
involving hypothesis generation
and testing
Strategy
 Decision-making Tasks- identify
alternatives, outline a criteria to judge
alternatives, apply criteria, select the
appropriate alternative
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
Experimental Inquiry- Primary Grades
 Give younger students sentence stems to
prompt their thinking.
 “I think if I water the plant more, then
___________ will happen.”
 “ If I mix blue and yellow together, I will
get __________.”
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
Experimental Inquiry- Intermediate Grades
 Students read specific scenarios and use the
information to write appropriate “If-Then”
statements.
 If I put _____ paperclips on one side of the
scale, then it will equal the ______ on the
other side.
 If I use _________ to complete the circuit,
then the light bulb will turn on.
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
Experimental Inquiry- Secondary Grades
 Students use knowledge to draw
conclusions about past, present, or future
events
How would the U.S. be different if the British
had won the American Revolutionary War?
 If the legal voting age was lowered to 16,
how would politics be different?
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
# 22- Engaging students in cognitively complex tasks
involving hypothesis generation and testing
It’s Video
Time!
www.effectiveeducators.com
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 23- Providing Resources and
Guidance
 Providing Support for Claims- When
students make statements or come to a
conclusion, the teacher asks for grounds,
backing, and qualifiers for their claims.
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 23- Providing Resources and
Guidance
 Grounds- the initial evidence for a claim.
 Why do you think your claim is true?
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 23- Providing Resources and
Guidance
 Backing- Additional information about the
grounds that helps establish validity.
 What other evidence do you have?
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate
and Test Hypotheses
# 23- Providing Resources and
Guidance
 Qualifiers- exceptions to the claims
 My claim is true except when ______
occurs.
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
# 23- Providing Resources and Guidance
It’s Video
Time!
www.effectiveeducators.com
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
Desired Effect
Remember!
 The Desired Effect is the intended
result of the teacher’s strategy.
 What you want to happen as a
result of that element.
DQ 4- Helping Students Generate and
Test Hypotheses
ELEMENT
DESIRED EFFECT
(21) Organizing
(21) The teacher organizes students
Students for Cognitively into small groups to generate and
Complex Tasks
test hypothesis and deepen
knowledge of real-world situations.
(22) Engaging Students
in Cognitively complex
Tasks Involving
Hypothesis Generation
and Testing
(22) Students will engage in
cognitively complex tasks that
require them to better understand
how to generate and test
hypothesis.
(23) Providing
Resources and
Guidance
(23) Students are aware that the
teacher is there to provide guidance
and resources for cognitively
complex tasks.
Design Question 8
Establish and Maintain Effective
Relationships with Students
DQ 8- Establish and Maintain
Effective Relationships with
Students
“The quality of relationships that teachers have with their
students is a keystone of effective classroom managementperhaps even a necessary condition for effective teaching.”
Dr. Robert Marzano
DQ 8- Establish and Maintain
Effective Relationships with
Students
# 36 Understanding students’ interests and
backgrounds
Strategies
 Student interest survey
 Opinion questionnaires
 Teacher-student conferences
 Parent-teacher conferences
DQ 8- Establish and Maintain
Effective Relationships with
Students
# 37 Using Verbal and Nonverbal Behaviors that
Indicate Affection for Students
Strategies
 Greeting students as they enter the classroom
 Giving students special responsibilities/leadership roles
in the classroom
 Humor
 Informal discussions
 Smiles, high 5’s, pats on the back
DQ 8- Establish and Maintain Effective
Relationships with Students
# 37 Using Verbal and Nonverbal Behaviors that
Indicate Affection for Students
It’s Video
Time!
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DQ 8- Establish and Maintain
Effective Relationships with
Students
# 38 Displaying objectivity and control
Strategies
 Self-reflection
 Maintaining a cool exterior
 Active listening and speaking
DQ 8- Establish and Maintain Effective
Relationships with Students
ELEMENT
DESIRED EFFECT
(36) Understanding
Students' Interests and
Backgrounds
(36) Students must feel that they
are accepted and belong in the class
as a result of the teacher's interest
in their personal lives.
(37) Using Verbal and
Nonverbal Behaviors
that Indicate Affection
for Students
(37) The teacher will demonstrate
affection for students by using
verbal or non-verbal behaviors and
cues such that the students feel
accepted and validated
(38) Displaying
Objectivity and Control
(38) Students feel accepted and a
sense of community when they
know the teacher is in control and
act objectively.
Design Question 9
Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
DQ 9- Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
It’s Video
Time!
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DQ 9- Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
# 39 Demonstrating value and respect for lowexpectancy students
Strategies
 Monitor affective tone and quality of interaction with
students
 Ensure behavior is not controlled by biased patterns of
thought
 Equalize the use of positive verbal and non-verbal
contact
DQ 9- Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
# 40 Asking questions of low-expectancy students
Strategies
 Response opportunities
 Follow-up questions
 Wait time
 Avoiding inappropriate reactions
DQ 9- Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
# 41 Probe incorrect answers with low-expectancy
students
Strategies
 Letting students “off the hook” temporarily
 Answer revision
 Think-Pair-Share
DQ 9- Communicating High
Expectations for All Students
ELEMENT
DESIRED EFFECT
(39) Demonstrating
Value and Respect for
Low Expectancy
Students
(39) All students feel important to
the teacher.
(40) Asking Questions
of Low Expectancy
Students
(40) Teacher will ask all students
questions with same frequency and
depth
(41) Probing Incorrect
Answers with Low
Expectancy Students
(41) All students are probed in the
same manner when responding in
an incorrect way.
Domain 2
Planning and Preparing
Domain 2
Planning and Preparing
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Time!
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Domain 3
Reflecting on Teaching
Domain 3
Reflecting on Teaching
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Time!
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Domain 4
Collegiality and
Professionalism
Domain 4
Collegiality and Professionalism
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Time!
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QUESTIONS???????
ALICIA CURRIN-MOORE
[email protected]
587.0817 (OFFICE)
306.7129 (CELL)

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