PFreer Feb2014 - Bibb County Schools

Report
Building RTI Fidelity
Bibb County
February 2014
Paula Freer, PhD
RTI Consultant
Objectives
Critical role RTI plays in School Improvement
Review the major components of RTI
Framework Fidelity
Review RTI Fidelity -Using the SSTAGE RTI Rubric
Action plan Bibb County district and school level
RTI Fidelity
Random Acts of
Improvement
Or
Aligned Acts of
Improvement
Characteristics of Effective Practice for SST, RTI Describe what evidence or
outcome data you have to support
and the Pyramid of Intervention framework
that this practice is in place.
Level of Implementation
1 – Just beginning
2 - Making good progress
3 - Well established
1
Effective, systematic problem solving process at each tier
with:
 Defined responsibilities and roles of members
 Alignment, communication & connectedness (with/to
other teams)
 Data driving the team’s decision making to inform
instruction
A coordinated system of assessment and progress
monitoring (to include universal screening of all students,
decision making rules, data collection and analysis,
measures of fidelity, and intervention effectiveness).
A coordinated system of instructional/behavioral supports
and programs with resources allocated (to include
scheduling, research-based materials and practices, and
staffing).
Job-embedded professional learning and ongoing teacher
support that addresses relevant areas essential to effective
implementation including:
 Coaching support
 Follow-up to ensure implementation of new skills
 Case study examples
A systematic plan with specified practices for parent/family
communication and involvement.
Sample practices such as:
 Evidence in developing parent/family pyramids
 Parent/Family brochures
 Parent/Family training modules
2
3
GaDOE- SSTAGE RTI Rubric
Essential Elements
 Collaborative Problem-Solving
 Assessment
 Instruction and Intervention
In each essential element are these components:
 Leadership and Infrastructure
 Professional Learning
 Parent/Family and Community Involvement
 Process and Procedures
Ware County Schools- RTI Model of Achievement &
Accountability First Adopted July 11, 2006
High School Graduation Rate
Where We Were Then-2004-05
04-05
All
Black
White
SWD
ED
45.1
31.1
54.5
8.9
31.0
Where We Are Now- 2011-12
11-12
All
Black
White
SWD
ED
80.1
76.1
82.9
50.0
78.8
What Changed?
• No single “silver bullet”
• Increased expectations that underscored the
unacceptability of waiting for students to fail
• A laser-like focus on standards based instruction
• A strong emphasis on rigor, relevance, and
relationships
• The development of the Ware County Pyramid of
Interventions (RtI) that is fully integrated into a systemic,
unified, and comprehensive approach to school
improvement
• Work hard to engage and/or re-engage
students in instruction
Dr. Joseph Barrow, Ware County Superintendent now Fayette County Supt.
Griffin Spalding County School System
Working Together: RTI-Academics & RTIBehavior
Positive Outcomes
 2011 Georgia Title 1 Distinguished Large District of the Year
 Accredited by AdvancEd (SACS-CASI), earning the highest rating in two standards and the second highes
rating in the remaining five standards
 94% or 17 of 18 schools made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
 District Wide Positive Behavior Support Implementation for three years
 Race to the Top System
GSCS Discipline DataReduced with PBIS
•
•
•
•
•
Reduced Incidents 38%
Reduced ISS/LEC 45%
Reduced OSS 30%
Reduced Bus Referrals 53%
Graduation Rate Increased 10%
RTI
Standards
Core Skill
Based Deficits
Deficits
*Reading
*Math
*Behavior
*Written Lang
It is CRITICAL that these core
differences are understood
Key elements: Ga Pyramid of
Interventions
Specially-Designed Learning:
CCGPS access/extension,
greater frequency of progress monitoring, specialized programs, methodology or
instructional delivery (Special Ed, EL, Gifted, 504, ...)
4
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
SST-Driven Learning:
In addition to Tier 1 and Tier 2 Different by
including individualized assessments, formal progress monitoring, interventions tailored
to individual needs. SST Process is required in every Georgia school.
Needs-Based Learning:
In addition to Tier 1 Different by
including standard intervention protocol process for identifying and providing
targeted groups research based interventions based on school & class wide
data/needs and ongoing progress monitoring
Standards-Based Classroom Learning :
All
students; implementation of the CCGPS through research-based practices,
differentiated instruction and progress monitoring through multiple formative
assessment and analysis of student work. School-Wide Positive Behavioral
Interventions and Supports.
Positive Student Outcomes are
Dependent Upon
• Fidelity of implementation of RTI Framework
(at the system and school levels)
•Degree to which interventions are empirically
supported (evidence and/or research-based)
• Fidelity of intervention implementation
(at the interventionist and teacher level- classroom
level)
(Pierangelo & Giuliani, 2008)
What is Fidelity?
Fidelity of implementation refers to how closely
the prescribed procedures of a process or
intervention are followed (Mellard & Johnson, 2007).
Fidelity and Integrity are two major terms used in
RTI research. They are often used
interchangeably.
RTI Fidelity
System
Level
High
School
Elementary
Middle
RTI Fidelity Matters
Tier 4
Problem-Solving Process
Frequent progress monitoring
Most intensive interventions
Tier 3
SST Problem-Solving Process
Individualized interventions
Progress Monitoring
Tier 2
Data teams-PST
Targeted group, standard protocol
interventions Progress Monitoring
Tier 1
Assessment and Universal Screening
Instruction, Curriculum
Walk-Through (e.g., instructional fidelity)
Leadership
Data Driven
Prob -Solv
Assessment
Instruction
&
Intervention
SSTAGE RTI/POI Best Practice Rubric: Learning,
Self-assessment and Planning Tool
Includes five major components of the
RTI/ POI framework:
1. Problem Solving Process
2. Assessment and Progress Monitoring
3. Instructional/Behavioral supports
4. Professional Learning /Teacher support
5. Parent/Family Communication & Involvement
19
What is Fidelity of Assessment?
Universal Screening -US &
Progress Monitoring-PM
Fidelity of the data collection process
means that all individuals are collecting
data following exactly the same
procedures
(Barringer, 2011)
Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring
Universal screeners help show the “big picture”
Whole school or large groups of students:
 Universally screened- using grade level CBM Probes:
•Reading
(1min. fluency, 2-5 min Maze Rdg. Comp)
•Math
(2-4 min computation fluency; concepts/applic 5-20 min)
•Writing
(5 min fluency)
•Behavior (Frequency/type of office referrals, attendance…)
Essential Q’s Universal Screening:
•How are our 9th graders performing in reading using 9th grade probe?
Progress Monitoring assesses targeted student skills to measure
response to intervention using CBM Probes
 Progress monitoring- CBM Probes at student’s performance level
Essential Q’s Universal Screening:
•How is John- a 9th grader (who is at 6th gr level math) responding to PALS- Math
intervention using normed 6th grade math probe?
Green Zone
Red Zone
Yellow Zone
Frust
Mastery
Instr
Green Zone
Yellow Zone
Red Zone
Key Components (Barringer, 2011)
Students’ Universally Screened &
Progress monitored
CBM assessments (normed)
Results graphed against goals, comparison
groups, and expected rates of weekly
progress- all based on research/norms
Decisions regarding curriculum and
instruction based on data
(NRCLD, 2006)
Fidelity of RTI Assessment:
US and PM
What is Fidelity of
Data Decision-Making and Interpretation?
 Fidelity means that the same decision making
processes/rules are being applied to every
case, across settings and across time
 Fidelity means that the data is being
interpreted the same way by all individuals
engaged in interpretation
(Barringer, 2011)
Looking at data by class level
Many students in red zone. Q’s: core curriculum, instructional
issues?
Consider group or classwide interventions rather than
referring one student at a time (STEEP, 2009)
What does this data by class level tell us?
(STEEP, 2008)
In this class we have identified a small number of students who need:
Small Group Intervention Supports
(Easy CBM, 2011)
National Center on
Student Progress
Monitoring, 2008
Fidelity Activity -Universal Screening
Interpreting Results Between and Within Campuses
• What does the universal screening data tell you
about these 6 schools?
– What questions would you ask about certain school’s
curriculum and instructional practices?
– The readiness of each school for the Common Core?
Fidelity Activity -Universal Screening
What is Fidelity of the
Problem-Solving Process?
Fidelity means that the data is being
interpreted the same way by all individuals
engaged in interpretation.
Tier 1- School-wide and grade level data
trends
Tier 2- Data teams, targeted small group school
needs- standard protocol interventions
Tier 3- SST- Individualized student support plans
Tier 4- Specialized Programs- Gifted, EL, SWD…
(Barringer, 2011)
Successful RTI/POI
School Improvement focus
Not WHO/individual student problems
Larger Who( Tier 1-school-wide, grade level, class),
WHAT, WHERE, WHY, HOW (Curric., Instr…, Tchg…Learning)
 Equitable Data Driven Practices
School
Grade Level
Classroom
Student groups
Individual students
Georgia’s Student Achievement
Pyramid of Interventions/RTI
What It Is
What It Is Not
• Integrated system of service
delivery
• Special education eligibility
system
• Prevention model
• Generalized discussions of
students’ problems (can’t
read, not motivated, etc.)*
• School Improvement
• Using data-driven decision
making process
• Aligned with NCLB, IDEIA ,
GaKEYS, CCRPI…
• Focus on what is wrong with
student (vs. school, grade
level, classroom,
instructional, curriculum,
targeted group needs,
individual student)
RTI Barriers/MYTHS
• Purpose of POI is to refer for testing or sped
• Students who fail, must be disabled
• Students should be tested if they are behind
grade level
• If students have a diagnosis from physician or
private psychological, they must be eligible for
special education
• All students who are tested will be eligible for
special education
• All sped students are eligible K-12/life
• All SDD students should continue to be eligible
for sped
Transitioning to RTI Roles
• Central Office Staff
• School Administrators
• School Improvement
coaches
• Instructional Coaches
• Department Chairs
• RTI Chair
• SST Chair
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Teachers
Counselors
School Psychologists
Social Workers
Special Educators
Support Staff
Parents
Students
What is Fidelity of the
Problem-Solving Process?
E:\Bibb\admin sch imp
coaches\TIPS-FidelityChecklist-Revised.pdf
SSTAGE RTI/POI Best Practice Rubric: Learning,
Self-assessment and Planning Tool
Includes five major components of the
RTI/ POI framework:
1. Problem Solving Process
2. Assessment and Progress Monitoring
3. Instructional/Behavioral supports
4. Professional Learning /Teacher support
5. Parent/Family Communication & Involvement
Characteristics of Effective Practice for SST, RTI Describe what evidence or
outcome data you have to support
and the Pyramid of Intervention framework
that this practice is in place.
Level of Implementation
1 – Just beginning
2 - Making good progress
3 - Well established
1
2
3
Effective, systematic problem solving process at each tier
with:
 Defined responsibilities and roles of members
 Alignment, communication & connectedness (with/to
other teams)
 Data driving the team’s decision making to inform
instruction
A coordinated system of assessment and progress
monitoring (to include universal screening of all students,
decision making rules, data collection and analysis,
measures of fidelity, and intervention effectiveness).
A coordinated system of instructional/behavioral supports
and programs with resources allocated (to include
scheduling, research-based materials and practices, and
staffing).
Job-embedded professional learning and ongoing teacher
support that addresses relevant areas essential to effective
implementation including:
 Coaching support
 Follow-up to ensure implementation of new skills
 Case study examples
A systematic plan with specified practices for parent/family
communication and involvement.
Sample practices such as:
 Evidence in developing parent/family pyramids
 Parent/Family brochures
 Parent/Family training modules
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timers funny
stuff\count_dow
n_10MIN.wmv
F:\Pff file timers funny
stuff\count_down_10MIN.wmv
SSTAGE RTI/POI Best Practice Rubric: Learning,
Self-assessment and Planning Tool
Includes five major components of the
RTI/ POI framework:
1. Problem Solving Process
2. Assessment and Progress Monitoring
3. Instructional/Behavioral supports
4. Professional Learning /Teacher support
5. Parent/Family Communication & Involvement
42
What is Fidelity
in Curriculum and Instruction?
Fidelity of implementation is the delivery of
instruction and interventions in the way in
which they are designed to be delivered
(Gresham, MacMillan, Boebe-Frankenberger, &
Bocian, 2000)
Examples of assessing instructional fidelity
include:
Walk-Throughs
Peer observations
(Barringer, ret. 2011)
Tier 1 is the Foundation for ALL Tiers
Tier 1 is the foundation of the Pyramid. Tier 1 academic
and behavioral supports are vital to the success of all Tiers.
School-wide, grade level, class- wide data guides:
Selection of Tier 1 research based strategies
Universal Design for Learning
Differentiation
Instructional planning including core foundational
skills
Ongoing formative assessment
Focus for coaching, consultation, feedback
Common Core GPS
RTI, Differentiation, and UDL
Tier 4
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Classrooms: Instruction is differentiated
based on the readiness, interests, or learner
profile data of specific students in the class
HOW
District-wide/School-wide: Local curricula incorporate
UDL Principles to maximize student access
Statewide: CCGPS and GPS—WHAT
Snyder, 2012
Successful RTI/POI
School Improvement
• Data-Driven Problem Solving
SW
GR.L
Classrm
Grp-Stu
Individual student
– School Level Data Trends
– Grade Level Data Trends
– Classroom Level Data Trends
– Targeted Group student Trends/ID needs
– Individual Student data trends
What is Fidelity of
Intervention Implementation?
• Degree to which interventions are
empirically supported (evidence and/or
research-based)
• Fidelity of intervention implementation
(at the interventionist and teacher levelclassroom level)
(Barringer, 2011)
There is a great deal of confusing language
being used to ‘qualify’ strategies, interventions,
programs and practices
Which is which?
• Strategies
______________
• Interventions:
– Scientifically-Based
– Research-Based
– Evidence-Based
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
______________
______________
______________
48
Strategies
Definition of Strategy
A loosely defined collective term that is often used
interchangeably with the word “intervention”; however strategies
are generally considered effective instructional and behavioral
practices rather than a set of prescribed instructional procedures,
systematically implemented (GaDOE RTI Guidance).
Examples (Classroom Instruction that Works, Marzano)
–
–
–
–
–
Cooperative learning
Reinforcing effort and providing recognition
Setting objectives and providing feedback
Nonlinguistic representations
Graphic organizers
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
Interventions are NOT…
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Preferential seating
Shortened assignments
Parent contacts
Classroom observations
Suspension
Doing MORE of the same
Retention
Peer helpers (informal)
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
(John McCook, 2006)
Understanding Scientifically-Based Interventions
(NASP-Harn, 2007)
ESEA Defines Scientifically Based Reading Research as:
– (A) applies rigorous, systematic, and objective procedures to
obtain valid knowledge relevant to reading development, reading
instruction, and reading difficulties; and
– (B) includes research that:
• (i) employs systematic, empirical methods that draw on
observation or experiment;
• (ii) involves rigorous data analyses that are adequate to test
the stated hypotheses and justify the general conclusions
drawn;
• (iii) relies on measurements or observational methods that
provide valid data across evaluators and observers and
across multiple measurements and observations; and
• (iv) has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal or
approved
by a panel of independent experts through a
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
comparably
rigorous, objective, and scientific review.
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
(20 U. S.www.gadoe.org
C. § 6368(6))
Interventions
• Definition of an intervention
– Targeted instruction that is based on student needs.
Interventions supplement the general education
curriculum. Interventions are a systematic
compilation of well researched or evidencebased specific instructional strategies and
techniques (GaDOE RTI Guidance).
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
6 R-B/E-B Intervention Non-Negotiables …
1. Connected to a specific goal that is well-defined,
observable and measurable
2. Matched to Student Need
 Can’t Do (Skill) or Won’t Do (motivational deficit) or Both?
 Functional behavior/academic assessment
 Attention, escape…
 Acquisition, proficiency-fluency, generalization, adaptation
 Reading comprehension, phonemic awareness, fluency…
3. Have specific, defined, step-by-step directions (scripts,
protocols) so they can be:
Implemented consistently
Can be replicated, so it can be researched
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
(Freer, 2010; Burns,M., Chris Riley-Tillman, T., &
VanDerHeyden, A., 2012)
6 R-B/E-B Intervention Non-Negotiables …
4. Include ongoing research based progress monitoring of
the student’s response to the intervention
(research/normed reading, math, written language)
 Goal, aim line & trend line (based on research)?
 Weekly expected rate of progress or growth based on research?
 Training and Fidelity of administration, scoring, interpretation and data
decision-making rules of PM (based on research)?
5. Intervention training; Coaching to support the
intervention training; Fidelity data on intervention
implementation
6. Scheduling to support interventions?
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
(Freer, 2010; Burns,M., Chris Riley-Tillman, T., &
VanDerHeyden, A., 2012)
Intervention Science
Scientists/researchers have produced programs and practices that
can help students, communities & education systems
– What Works Clearinghouse
http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/
– Best Evidence Encyclopedia
www.bestevidence.org
– Promising Practices Network
promisingpractices.net
– Florida Center on Reading Research
http://www.fcrr.org/
– Evidence Based Intervention Network
http://ebi.missouri.edu/
Dr. John D. Barge, State School
Superintendent
“Making Education Work for All Georgians”
www.gadoe.org
Intervention Tools
Evidence Based Intervention Network
Univ. of Missouri
TOOLS- @40 academic and behavioral interventions
*Evidence Briefs
*Intervention Scripts
*Videos
http://ebi.missouri.edu/
Top Reasons for Academic Problems
(Daly & Martens, 1997; EB Interv ret www. 2012 )
 The task is too hard for the  The student has demonstrated
student the skill before, but has
difficulty applying the skill in a
Acquisition Interventions
new manner  They have not had
enough help doing the
task
Proficiency/Accuracy
Interv’s
 The student has not spent
enough time doing the
academic activity Proficiency/Speed Interv’s
Generalization Interventions
 The student does not want to
do the academic task
Motivation Interventions
Intervention Tools
Intervention Central
 Reading Intervention Manual
http://www.jimwrightonline.com/pdfdocs/brouge/rdngManual.PDF
o 13 interventions in the Reading Intervention Manual:













Paired , Repeated Reading
Assisted Reading Practice
Listening Passage Preview
Advanced Story Map Instruction
“Click or Clunk?” A Student Comprehension Self-Check
Keywords: A Memorization Strategy
Main-Idea Maps
Mental Imagery: Improving Text Recall
Oral Recitation Lesson
Prior Knowledge: Activating the ‘Known’
Question-Generation
Reciprocal Teaching: A Reading Comprehension Package
Text Lookback
Intervention Central
Math Fluency and Problem-solving interventions
Cover-copy-compare-intervention and materials
(also see Rathvon intervention book materials):
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/cover-copycompare
Applied math/QAR-intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/mathproblem-solving
Math Computation: Increase Accuracy By
Intermixing Problems-intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/mathcomputation-increase-accuracy-intermixing-easy-and-challenging-comp
Incremental Rehearsal-intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/mathcomputation-promote-mastery-math-facts-through-incremental-rehearsa
Math Fold-in intervention-intervention and
materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/self_management_math_SAFI
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_blog/self_mana
gement_math_SAFI.pdf
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_blog/self_mana
gement_math_SAFI_1.pdf
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_blog/self_mana
gement_math_SAFI_2.pdf
Student Self-Monitoring of Productivity to Increase
Fluency-intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/mathcomputation-student-self-monitoring-productivity-increase-fluency
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/se
lf_monitoring_math_comp_increase_productivity_student_score_sheet.pdf
Combining Cognitive & Metacognitive Strategiesintervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/mathproblem-solving-combining-cognitive-metacognitive-strategies
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_meta_cog_strategy_montague_SAY_ASK_CHECK.pdf
Peer Tutoring in Math Computation with Constant
Time Delay-intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/peer-tutoringmath-computation-constant-time-delay
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_tutoring_time_delay_tchr_nomination_form.pdf
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_tutoring_time_delay_integrity_checklist.pdf
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_tutoring_time_delay_score_sheet.pdf
Student Self-Monitoring: Customized Math SelfCorrection Checklists -intervention and materials:
http://www.interventioncentral.org/academic-interventions/math/selfmonitoring-customized-math-self-correction-checklists
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_error_correction_checklist_sample.pdf
http://www.interventioncentral.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/pdfs_interventions/m
ath_error_correction_checklist_blank.pdf
PALS TA: Iris Vanderbilt Website
Gr K-1 PALS
http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/palsk1/chalcycle.
htm
Gr 2-6 Reading PALS
http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/pals26/chalcycle.htm
HS PALS Module
http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/palshs/chalcycle.htm
PL- Specific Training and Support for
Interventionists
(Windram & Gibbons, 2011; Hirallel & Martens, 1998)
How will intervention implementation fidelity
be ensured?
Select an intervention with high probability of success
Communicate a clear plan to interventionists
Provide specific PL, coaching, and support to
interventionists
 Directly observe intervention in action
 Trainer provides specific feedback
Application and coaching in the instructional setting
Collect and graph data on the goal
Is this student making progress?
Correct Words Per Minute
120
Tier 2 Intervention: PALS-Reading
100
110
Benchmark
90
100
80
90
70
8060
7050
60
40
45
30
35
54
50
20
40
25
40
60
66
28
23
48 46
50
10
0
= Peer Group
 = Target Student
= Aim Line
= Trend Line
(Batsche, 2005)
Fidelity of Progress Monitoring
(Windram & Gibbons, 2011)
Check:
 Is progress being monitored according to the plan?
 Are data collected and graphed on the
intervention goal?
 Using aimline, expected rate of progress?
 If the progress monitoring is not happening as planned
then:
 Give additional support OR
 Change the progress monitoring plan
Decisions based on norms/research
(Fuchs, 2008; National Center on Student Progress Monitoring, 2008)
(Fuchs, 2008; NCSPM, 2008)
Gr
PRF
Maze
1
2.00
0.40
2
1.5
0.40
3
1.0
0.40
4
0.90
0.40
5
0.50
0.40
6
0.30
0.40
Expected
weekly rate of
progress
Top reasons why interventions FAIL?
• Not implemented with Fidelity
– Implemented Inconsistently
– Implemented Incorrectly- missing steps, not implemented
in the time it was designed
(Ex: Do intervention for 20 min 1x wk when research
designed for 45 min intervention- 3x wk)
• Not matched to student need
• Lack of Progress Monitoring
• Lack of training, coaching and fidelity to
support
• Lack of scheduling supports
Essential Questions: Assessing Instructional
Contexts and the Fidelity of Implementation
What is fidelity?
 Whether an intervention was implemented as
planned (Moncher & Prinz, 1991)
Surface fidelity (Gersten, Fuchs, Compton,et al., 2005)
 Were key components implemented?
 Was adequate time allowed?
 Was the specified amount of material covered?
Quality of delivery (Gersten, Fuchs, Compton,et al., 2005)
 Teacher behaviors
 Student behaviors
(Parisi, Potter & Whitcomb, NASP 2007)
Intervention Fidelity/Integrity (Windram & Gibbons, 2011)
Complete ongoing assessment of implementation through:
Participant Reports
Observation
Review of Permanent Product(s)
STUDENT:
Jaymes
Area
TEACHER/CLASS PERIOD: Watson
Level of
Implementation
Materials and Time
1. Teacher has her and checks on
student intervention sheet ready at
beginning of class
2. Teacher provides student time mgmt
cues throughout class period
INTERVENTION
DATE: Jan 8, 2009
Comments
2
1
0
Teacher is stressed, class
mgmt is problem
2
1
0
Good use of time mgmt cues
3. Teacher follows 4 steps of the
intervention
2
1
0
Missed steps 2 and 3
4. Uses clear signals and cues to redirect
2
1
0
Not consistent
2
1
0
Stressed, other students mgmt
issues
2
1
0
Tries hard but overwhelmed
with half class beh issues
2
1
0
Provides wrong info
2
1
0
Student likes her
2
1
0
inconsistent
2
1
0
No transitional cues
2
1
0
Tries but not consistent
2
1
0
Forgets to do it
2
1
0
Forgets to do it
5. Provides students many opportunities
to respond and reinforce appropriate
behavior
6. Models skills/strategies appropriately
and with ease
7. Corrects all errors using correct
technique
8. Student asks for teacher assistance as
outlined in intervention
9. Student uses correct responses
outlined in intervention
10. Teacher helps provide time cues and
transitional cues outlined in
intervention
11. Teacher maintains good pacing, allows
for student response time
12. Student tallies behaviors using selfmonitoring form
13. Teacher documents progress
monitoring-behavioral tallies
TOTAL: 11/26
42% Intervention Fidelity
Response to
“Failure to Implement” Intervention?
If the intervention is not implemented
as designed, progress (or lack thereof)
cannot be attributed to the specific
plan or to student failure to respond
(Windram & Gibbons, 2011;Kaufman & Flicek, 1995).
Who Monitors Fidelity?
 Someone trained in the intervention being
monitored
 Someone trained in structured observation
 Someone trained in giving feedback and
coaching
 Someone who can develop positive,
supportive relationships with teachers
When Do You Monitor
Fidelity/Integrity?
 At the beginning, frequently
 Provide staff immediate, brief, constructive
feedback
 Follow up with written feedback
 After a solid protocol is established, less
frequently
 Always when the interventionist asks for
help
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SSTAGE RTI/POI Best Practice Rubric: Learning,
Self-assessment and Planning Tool
Includes five major components of the
RTI/ POI framework:
1. Problem Solving Process
2. Assessment and Progress Monitoring
3. Instructional/Behavioral supports
4. Professional Learning /Teacher support
5. Parent/Family Communication & Involvement
73
Parent/Family & Community Involvement
A systematic plan with specified practices for parent/family
communication and involvement.
Sample practices such as:
 Evidence in developing parent/family pyramids
 Parent/Family brochures
 Parent/Family training modules
•Schools/teams engage families as active participants in the PSP.
•Use a process to inform parents and community of RTI and the PSP.
•Parents demonstrate an understanding of the RTI and a MTSS
framework.
•Parents are invited to participate and understand their child’s
progress relative to grade level standards and their child’s
corresponding response to instruction and intervention. Evidence of
collaboration and engagement of parents at all tiers
The district and school use data to assess the effectiveness of family and
community partnerships. Schools/teams strive to develop and maintain a
collaborative culture by consistently engaging families and the community in the
PSP by:
1. providing a welcoming and culturally sensitive climate
2. providing training in problem solving steps, communication skills, and the
RTI process and framework
3. offering scheduling alternatives and various means of communication
4. celebrating growth and learning
5. parent university
6. interactive parent websites.
District or School Website
Parent Activity Documentation
Parent Workshops
Team Meeting Notes
Parent Brochures
Parent Conference Documentation
Surveys and Data
Positive Student Outcomes are
Dependent Upon
• Fidelity
of implementation of RTI Framework
(at the school and system levels)
•Degree to which interventions are empirically
supported (evidence and/or research-based)
• Fidelity of intervention implementation
(at the interventionist and teacher levelclassroom level)
(Pierangelo & Giuliani, 2008)
Questions
Next Steps
• Use SSTAGE rubric to develop your needs
assessment and action plan
• Bring action plan to share at next meeting
• Choose 1 resource targeted to one need area
and map out how you will use it
• Identify PL needs and share at next meeting
Thank you!
You are the key to success!
Together, We Can Make a Difference!
Paula Freer, PhD
RTI Consultant
[email protected]
References
Barringer, M. (ret. 2011 www) Fidelity Monitoring in RTI. The SBS Group.
Beebe-Frankenberger, Mahdavi & Ruby (2011) Exploring The Positive
Relationship Between Social Validity and Fidelity in RTI Schools. San
Francisco: NASP.
Burns, M. K., & Gibbons, K. A. (2008). Implementing response-tointervention in elementary and secondary schools. Routledge: New
York.
Cordray, D. (2007) Fidelity of Intervention Implementation. IES Summer
Training Institute on Cluster Randomized Control Trials , June 17-29,
2007 Nashville, TN.
Gansle, K. A., & Noell, G. H. (2007). The fundamental role of
intervention implementation in assessing response to intervention. In S.
R. Jimerson, M. K. Burns, & A. M. VanDerHeyden (Eds.), Response to
intervention: The science and practice of assessment and
intervention (pp. 244-251). New York: Springer Publishing.
References
Gresham, F. M. (1989). Assessment of treatment integrity in school
consultation & prereferral intervention. School Psychology Review, 18,
27-50.
Gresham, F. M., Gansle, K. A., & Noell, G. H. (1993). Treatment integrity
in applied behavior analysis with children. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 26(2), 257-263.
Haring, N.G., Lovitt, T.C., Eaton, M.D., & Hansen, C.L. (1978). The fourth
R: Research in the classroom. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill
Publishing Co.
Hawkins, R. O., Morrison, J. Q., Musti-Rao, S., & Hawkins, J. A. (2008).
Treatment integrity for academic interventions in real- world settings.
School Psychology Forum, 2(3), 1-15.
Johnson, E., Mellard, D.F., Fuchs, D., & McKnight, M.A. (2006).
Responsiveness to intervention (RTI): How to do it. Lawrence, KS:
NRCLD.
References
Mellard, D. Khan, C., McKnight, M. & Prewitt, S. (2009). Fidelity of
Implementation within an RTI Framework. National Center on RTI
Webinar; October 20th, The University of Kansas.
Roach, A. T., & Elliott, S. N. (2008). Best practices in facilitating and
evaluating intervention integrity. In A. Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best
practices in school psychology V (pp.195-208).
Skinner, C. H., Pappas, D. N., & Davis, K. A. (2005). Enhancing
academic engagement: Providing opportunities for responding and
influencing students to choose to respond. Psychology in the
Schools, 42, 389-403.
Windram, H. & Gibbons,K. (2011) Implementation Integrity within an RtI
Framework: Critical Roles and Tools for School Psychologists, St.
Croix River Education District (SCRED). San Francisco: NASP Workshop
Witt, J. C., VanDerHeyden, A. M., & Gilbertson, D. (2004).
Troubleshooting behavioral interventions. A systematic process for
finding and eliminating problems. School Psychology Review, 33, 363383.

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