Palasits-CRS-Talent Mapping Update Guidance_LINGOS General

Report
Talent Mapping & Career Development
Overview of Initial Work at Catholic
Relief Services-USCCB
Discussion at LINGOS Member Meeting
11 October 2011
1
Pillars of Talent Management
Commitment to Talent Management
Competency Framework
Performance Management System
Information System
Action Orientation
2
Competency Framework
 Agency-Wide Competencies
 Functional Competencies
 Agency-Wide
 Program Manager
 Management Quality Coordinator
 Head of Programs
 Country Representative
 Regional Director
 Leadership
Emergency Response
3
Major Gift Officers
Performance Management
Performance Planning
Development Planning
Coaching
Assessment
4
Information System
Learning
Performance Plans, Dev Plans,
Assessment
Career Profile
My Team
5
Learning
Recommended Curricula
Mentoring
Temporary Duty Assignments
“Acting” Posts
What is new in one’s current role
6
Why Talent Mapping?
 “Big picture” view of performance and learning
potential of staff.
 Connect CRS team members with the right
development opportunities to reach their full
potential;
 Facilitate strategic succession planning for critical
positions across the Agency;
 Harmonize individual career goals with broader
Agency needs.
7
Talent Mapping—CRS Template
Highly
effective
P
E
R
F
O
R
M
A
N
C
E
“Solid
Professional
Plus”
Key
Performer
Plus”
“
“
“
Solid Pro”
“Low
Performer”
Key
Performer
Inconsistent
Performer”
“
“Consistent
Star”
“Rising Star”
“New in
Role”
Less than
effective
Less
learning
agility
POTENTIAL
More
learning
8
agility
Talent Mapping
 Done regularly (every six months or so)
 Not labelling
 Worthwhile if leads to action
9
The Promise of Talent Mapping: What’s
in it for me (and my team)?
By following a fair, consistent and routine process of examining
talent, CRS will:
1. Promote confidence that CRS does invest time, resources,
and energy in the career development of every team member
by exploring our potential for professional growth,
highlighting our achievements, and systematically exploring
ways to match our abilities with increasingly demanding
responsibilities.
2.
10
Take a “big picture” look at the Agency talent pool on a
recurring basis to proactively, transparently, and efficiently fill
vacancies with internal applicants based on their ability,
interest, and availability.
Talent Mapping and Succession
Planning: Country Representatives
Key position of Country Representative
 Country Representative Competencies
 Ready Now, Ready 1-2 years, Potential CRs
Dialogue and follow-up with Country
Representatives
Organizational Dynamics-Trusting HR
11
Career Development: Other Actions
 Basic information on careers in CRS
 Career options
 Career lattices
 Interviews with staff
 Videos
 Helping Supervisors Discuss Career Development
 Careers in a Flat Organization, yet dynamic organization
12
Talent Mapping CRS Template
Core Performers
Highly
effective
P
E
R
F
O
R
M
A
N
C
E
Less than
effective
“Hi-Pro”
“Solid
Professional Plus”
Consistently produces
exceptional results
Consistently
produces
and high
performance ratings.
exceptional
results and
Knows
high
current job extremely
performance
ratings.well.
Knows
May
not effectively
job
extremely
adapt
well.
to May
new not
situations. adapt to new
effectively
requirements of the job.
“Hi Pro
“Key
Performer
Plus”
Plus”
Consistentlyproduces
Consistently
produces
exceptional results
exceptional
results
and
and
high
high
performance ratings.
performance
ratings.
Knows
Knows
the job
the
jobwell
welland
and
continuously
enhances skills.enhances
continuously
Adapts to new
situations
skills.
Adapts
if necessary.
to new
requirements of the job.
“Key Performer”
“Solid Pro”
Consistentlymeets
Consistently
meets
and
exceeds expectations.
expectations.
KnowsKnows
job
current
well.
May
job not
well.effectively
May not
effectively
adapt
to new
adapt
requirements
to new
situations.
of
the job.
“Low Performer”
Not delivering
Not
delivering
onon
results
results
as as
expected. Does
expected.
Doesnot
notadapt
adapt
toto
change wellnature
changing
and may
of the
be a job
blocked personal learner.
requirements.
Less learning
agility
Consistentlymeets
Consistently
meets
expectations.
Knows current job
expectations.
Knows
well and
job well
enhances
and
enhances
skills as
skills
appropriate.
as
Can adapt to new
appropriate.
Cansituations
adapt toas
new
necessary.
requirements
of the job as
necessary.
“Inconsistent Performer”
Deliversresults
Delivers
results
inconsistently.
Knows the job, and
inconsistently.
Knows
may be
the
a
passive
job,
andlearner.
may beMay
a passive
adapt to
new situations
learner.
May if
adapt
necessary.
to new
requirements of the job if
necessary.
POTENTIAL
“Consistent
“ConsistentStar
Star”
”
Outstanding,
Outstanding, clearest
clearestexample
example
ofofsuperior
superior performance
performanceand
and
potential.
potential. Has
Has the
theability
abilitytoto
take
takeon
on major
major stretch
stretch
assignments
assignments in
in new
newareas.
areas.Will
Will
challenge
challenge
the organization
the organization
to
toprovide
provide
growth
growth
opportunities
opportunities
fast enough. fast enough.
“Future Star”
“Rising
Star”
Consistentlymeets
Consistently
meets
and exceeds
expectations. Knows
expectations.
Knows
thethe
job job
well
and enhances
well
and enhances
skills as
skills as
appropriate. Has
appropriate.
Has
the
the
ability
ability
to
take
to
take
on new
on new
and different
and different
challenges on
challenges
ona a
consistent
consistent
basis.
basis.
The
Pipeline
“Diamond
“New
in Role”
in the Rough”
Delivers
Showing
results
gooderratically.
potential
Has not
yet
demonstrated
in role long
potential
enough
butmake
to
is not careful
living up to it.
assessment
More learning
agility
13
Guidelines for Use of the 3 X 3 Talent
Mapping Tool
 It is essential that staff be placed into a category that corresponds to their actual
performance over time and their realistic potential. It is not “better” to be a
Consistent Star than it is to be a Solid Professional Plus: both are performing at
a high level, both are valuable to the Agency, and both will have opportunities
for professional development and promotion within the Agency. Similarly, a
Rising Star is not “better” than a New In Role: they have just had more time to
demonstrate their ability, and may be more comfortable with the
responsibilities of their current role
 It may be helpful to review an individual’s performance and potential separately
at first to give an initial idea of grid placement, and subsequently use the grid
definitions on the next page to refine this positioning as necessary.
 It is anticipated that a significant number of our people will fall into the ‘Key
Performer’ category, and many will fall into the ‘Solid Professional Plus’. In a
position based organization, it is critical to have the stability, expertise and
steady, reliable performance of these employees to run the business.
 It is neither expected nor desirable that all employees eventually make it into the
‘Consistent Star’ category – this is NOT the ultimate goal for everyone.
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Further Comments on the Use of
the 3 X 3 Talent Map
 The boxes shaded in pink can be thought of, generally, as the
“core performers.”
 The boxes shaded in green can be thought of, generally, as
“the pipeline.”
 The following pages provide additional guidance on the
definitions used in the 3 x 3 Talent Map, as well as examples
(all fictional) of staff who might fall into each box.
15
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The Low Performer Category
16

The Low Performer category indicates a consistent failure to meet performance expectations and
an inability or unwillingness to improve performance under different circumstances.

Through coaching sessions and performance evaluations, the individual should already be aware of
the particular areas of performance that need to be addressed, the competencies that correspond to
these performance issues, and should have a development plan in place to address these challenges.

If there is not significant, rapid improvement in the individual’s ability to meet expectations, it will
be necessary to discuss their future with the Agency, in this, or any other, position.

Example: John has been working with CRS in Zambia for the last two years as an operations
manager (he arrived with some professional baggage from his previous work with CRS in Haiti, but
that was written off as being the result of stylistic differences with his last CR). During that time, he
has consistently had difficulty managing relationships with drivers, vendors, and program managers.
In an effort to allow him to focus on critical job functions, a fleet manager was recently hired to
supervise drivers on a day to day basis, and John was given greater responsibility for supply chain
management and long-term planning. Unfortunately, he has missed several critical supply chain
deadlines, micro-manages the fleet manager, and openly questions the value of long-term planning
“for something as fluid and unpredictable as operations”. These concerns have been raised in his
coaching sessions, he attended the CMP in Baltimore last year, and his previous performance rating
was Needs Improvement.
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The ‘Inconsistent” Category
17

The Inconsistent Performer category means either that the person is new to the position (i.e., generally less than 1
year) and has not yet met the expectations for performing in all aspects of this position; OR there may be a skills
mismatch /capability gap for this specific role

The individual has acknowledged some of these challenges and has expressed a willingness to address them. They
have identified specific professional development needs or potential modifications to their existing responsibilities.
Their development plan is focused on their current position and the need to have a greater impact in their existing
role.

If the individual’s performance does not improve over the coming year, but they remain committed to learning
and skills development, it will be necessary to discuss their current position and whether it is the best fit for them
within the Agency.

Example: Annette joined CRS Philippines as a PM I for agro-enterprise after completing her Fellowship in
Rwanda. In the six months since she arrived, she has established friendly working relationships with her
colleagues, contributed to a successful Gates Foundation proposal, and taken on responsibility for quarterly
reports to 2 private donors. However, she is visibly uncomfortable making visits to the field with M&E teams, has
had difficulty managing timely communications with the local partner, and has neglected many of her day to day
responsibilities in order to endlessly revise the private donor reports. She has acknowledged some difficulties with
time management, and is taking a CRSLearns course on effective business communication. During informal
coaching sessions, she’s asked for guidance on how to be more at ease in the field when interacting with program
beneficiaries and is trying to learn more about the partner’s history and style. She agrees that she has made some
missteps since her arrival, but appears committed to improving and has demonstrated on several occasions that she
can meet the expectations of her PM I job.
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The ‘Solid Pro’ Category
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
The ‘Solid Professional” category indicates that the person is meeting the overall expectations of the job.

The individual may have difficulty adapting if the role changes significantly and may very well not be interested in
moving to a different position.

CRS will support the individual in further refining their skills in their current role and staying up to date on
changes in their field of interest.

Development Plans should include actions to help the person master their current role and acquire any new
capabilities associated with potential changes in their responsibilities, as well as ways to transition to a different set
of responsibilities, if they so desire.

Example: Moses is the Technical Advisor for Risk Management and Compliance in EARO. He began his career as
a national staff in Kenya, and has been in his current role for 3 years. CPs consistently appreciate his input, and the
volume and severity of audit findings in the region have decreased in the last several years. He enjoys his work and
in his coaching sessions he consistently requests additional training on USG rules and regs, more exposure to HQ
finance, and opportunities to participate in audits or other compliance functions in different Regions. During a
prolonged staffing gap, Moses stepped in to act as the Management Quality Coordinator in Ethiopia. He clearly
struggled with the responsibilities of supervising staff, organizing competing priorities, running a capacity
building workshop for a local partner, and when the MQC position was filled, he couldn’t wait to get back to his
TA job. Recently, while the DRD MQ was out on maternity leave, Moses asked that he not be considered as acting
DRD, saying “I’ve got too much to do getting ready for this MYAP rollout and have a major warehouse inspection
and review coming up. I don’t have time to approve timesheets, help all of these CRs prepare their APPs for next
year, or help rewrite the MQ section of the Regional Strategy. That’s really just not my cup of tea.”
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The ‘Solid Professional Plus’ Category





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The ‘Solid Professional Plus’ category indicates that that the individual frequently exceeds expectations for the
position, and is highly valued by CRS for the contributions that they are making in their current position.
The individual is comfortable with their current duties and may have difficulty adapting if the role changes
significantly, or if they are requested to develop a markedly different skill set. The individual may not have interest
in moving to a different position or different level in the organizational hierarchy.
CRS will support the individual to develop additional expertise in their chosen field, to keep abreast of
innovations in their area of expertise, and to pursue different or complementary skills, if they so desire.
Development Plans should include actions to continually broaden and deepen skills and knowledge related to the
individual’s area of expertise, while remaining innovative and on the cutting edge. Should the individual decide
that they are interested in taking on additional or divergent responsibilities, their development plan should reflect
their desire to acquire these new skills.
Example: Jane has been a Head of Programming for the last seven years, first in Pakistan and now in Sudan. She
has a comprehensive grasp of PQ principles, is an exceptional writer, loves working with PMs to design,
implement, and monitor innovative programs, gets along well with partners, and is a gifted trainer. She has
received consistently high performance ratings throughout her time as HOP, and has earned the respect of
colleagues within the Agency and outside it. She is also unequivocal that she is not interested in becoming a CR or
DRD PQ: program quality and a hands-on approach to implementation are her passion, and she wishes to
continue working as an HOP, while honing her skills in M&E, ICT4D, local partner capacity development, and PQ
best practices. When she completes her assignment in Pakistan, she is interested in an HOP position in a mid-size
country program with a relatively stable environment, a place where “I can really sink my teeth into working with
PMs and partners to implement exceptionally innovative and exciting programs. Schmoozing with donors,
writing advocacy briefs, handling the latest security blowout, negotiating in-country registration renewals- leave
that stuff to the CRs. I got into this line of work to implement development programs, so let me do that.”
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The ‘Rising Star” Category




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The ‘Rising Star’ category indicates that the individual is meeting the overall expectations of their current position
and demonstrates a significant degree of learning agility and capacity to take on increasingly more complex and
demanding roles. CRS will work closely with them to select and implement challenging development
opportunities that will continue their career growth.
A Rising Star will typically be relatively new to the Agency (leaving them more room to learn and demonstrate
new abilities), but it is entirely possible that a long-serving employee who has been energized by a new set of
responsibilities, a specific challenge, an emergency response, a new supervisor, etc. will unexpectedly demonstrate
the capacity to take on a much more demanding assignment.
A Rising Star will typically be ready for a more complex position within 1-2 years. This of course does not
guarantee that such a position will exist within that timeframe, or that it will be the right fit for that individualthe specific next role and timing of a move are dependent on staffing needs and gaps, as well as any personal
considerations.
Example: Arthur has been working as PMI for a small economic strengthening project in Gaza for the last 14
months. Arthur inherited a well-designed project and a cohesive team from his predecessor, but he has delivered
consistent results in his own right- getting reports in on time, implementing a rigorous M&E system, regularly
meeting with partners, attending coordination meetings, and developing contingency plans for a Phase II of the
existing program. Though not part of his job responsibilities, he’s demonstrated that he has an excellent head for
security issues, and has performed calmly and coolly in several high pressure situations. He made an extremely
favorable impression on a donor during a recent site visit, so much so that the donor representative singled him
out for appreciation afterwards. Arthur immediately volunteered when there was a request for an emergency
TDYer in Egypt, his work-related communications are crisp, clear, and prompt, he is well liked by his peers and
clearly respected by his subordinates, and he eagerly and graciously accepts requests for support from other
departments and feedback from his supervisor. His direct supervisor greatly enjoys working with him, and his CR
has already informed him that he has a bright future with the Agency.
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The ‘Key Performer Plus’ Category



21
The ‘Key Performer Plus’ category indicates that that the individual is performing very well in their particular
role, frequently exceeds expectations for the position, and has demonstrated the potential to have an even greater
impact if given additional responsibilities and/or authority.
As in the case of a Rising Star, a Key Performer Plus will typically be ready for an even more demanding position
within 1-2 years. This of course does not guarantee that such a position will exist within that timeframe, or that it
will be the right fit for that individual- the specific next role and timing of a move are dependent on staffing needs
and gaps, as well as any personal considerations.
Example: Claudette has been the CARO RTA for Emergencies for the last 18 months. The RTA job had been
vacant for 6 months, so there were significant backlogs and high expectations awaiting her. During her time as
RTA, Claudette has exceeded these expectations: she has deployed to almost a dozen different emergency
responses, frequently as part of the first response team. She has helped write several major OFDA proposals that
were approved with minor issues letters, represented CRS in contentious cluster meetings, conducted a series of
popular SPHERE trainings for local partners, and backstopped the EARO RTA during a major emergency. She
provides timely and insightful distance support to CPs, she has volunteered for several Agency-wide emergency
strategic initiatives, and CARO CRs actively request her support rather than waiting for the Region to
recommend it. Though she does not directly supervise any staff, she has been an effective mentor and advisor for
Emergency PMs in CARO CPs. She has shown herself to be a good judge of character and an excellent listener. In
coaching conversations, she has expressed an interest in growing into a leadership position with E-OPS, but is also
open to developing more general PQ skills, so as to potentially take on a management role in a particularly
emergency-prone CP. In the words of her DRD PQ “She is a pleasure to work with, and has been a tremendous
asset to the Region. Though it will be difficult for us to replace her, we recognize that she could be an even greater
asset to the Agency in a more senior position, and we are supportive of her pursuing an expanded leadership or
management role.”
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
The Key Performer Category




22
Being assessed in the ‘Key Performer’ category indicates that CRS recognizes the individual’s dependable
performance and their desire to further improve results, hone skills, and gain experience in additional areas.
CRS will focus on continuing to develop the individual’s competencies in areas that align with Agency priorities
and staffing needs, taking into account personal interests and preferences.
As the person gains additional skills and/or experience and demonstrates the ability to meet or exceed
performance objectives, it is anticipated that there will continue to be ways for them to remain challenged and
engaged while making valuable contributions to the Agency. This may take the form of a more senior role, doing
similar work in a more complex or challenging environment, or acquiring new skills to take on previously
unexpected responsibilities.
Example: Lara has been the CR in Mali for the last 4 years, after holding a variety of PMI and PMII positions
with CRS over the previous decade. In Mali, she has consistently met the expectations that come with a job as
demanding and complex as CR. She has led the gradual growth of the CP to a sustainable size, while guiding the
recruitment and retention of a highly functional team of national and international staff. CRS has a low profile but
positive reputation in the NGO community, enjoys cordial communications with the US Mission, and has the
support of the local Church. Compliance issues are down from previous years, and visitors from the Region and
HQ are consistently impressed with the quality and innovation of CRS Mali programs. The Mali CP was headed in
a good direction when Lara arrived, and she has continued that trend. Currently, she is working on an eCornell
leadership certification, and actively seeks the counsel and advice of her RD and the broader Regional team. When
her assignment in Mali concludes, she is open to taking on a CR role in a more insecure, high-risk environment,
though she has also expressed that she has most enjoyed the programming aspects of the job, and is curious about
the possibility of focusing more exclusively on PQ for a time: either as a DRD PQ in a different region, or
through an indeterminate position back at HQ. She is not in a hurry to leave her current position, and will
continue a dialogue with her RD about future options within the Agency.
Using the 3 X 3 Map:
New in Role Category
 Placing a person in the “New to Role” category indicates that the person is new to their
position (i.e., 12 months or less), needs more time to demonstrate results and
potential.
 The supervisor should make a deliberate effort to discuss career objectives with the
individual in the course of coaching, and should make clear what the expectations for
success are in their current position.
 By the next iteration of the Talent Mapping exercise, the individual should have had
sufficient time to demonstrate some initial results and potential for future growth, and it
should be possible to move them into a different position on the 3 x 3 Grid.
 Example: Miguel arrived in Zimbabwe 3 months ago, after finishing his Fellowship in
Honduras. So far, he seems to be off to a good start. He is still settling into the PMI
position, but is asking good questions, applying quickly what he learns, meeting
performance expectations, demonstrating openness to advice, and working hard. The
new fiscal year is approaching, which should give Miguel a good opportunity to
demonstrate some planning, budgeting, and multi-tasking skills. Until he’s been in
Zimbabwe a bit longer, it would be premature to make an assessment of his
performance, skills or potential.
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Conclusion
 Talent Mapping informs decisions on career development.
 It is not labeling; it helps the agency understand better the
talent of its employees.
 CRs can apply the learning from talent mapping to
development plans and coaching session, and vice-versa.
 Contact Matt McGarry, Senior Advisor for Leadership and
Career Development, [email protected] or David
Palasits, HR Director, [email protected] if you have
questions.
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