PowerPoint

Report
Benefits of Career and Technical
Education (CTE)
NEFEC Guidance Counselor’s Forum
Gainesville, FL
Jodi Tillman, Public Schools Liaison
Division of Career and Adult Education
Florida Department of Education
January 14, 2014
1
Career
andand
Technical
Career
Technical
Education…
Education
It’s not your parent’s
wood shop or home
economics class!
2
CTE Today…
3
CTE Works for High School Students
•High school students involved in CTE are more engaged,
perform better and graduate at higher rates.
• More than 70 percent of secondary CTE concentrators
pursued postsecondary education shortly after high
school.
• A ratio of one CTE class for every two academic classes
minimizes the risk of students dropping out of high school.
CAPE Participants
Performance by Academy Participation and Industry Certification Attainment, 201112, Grades 9-12 Only
Non-CAPE, No
Certification
CAPE, No
Certification
Non-CAPE +
Certification
CAPE +
Certification
2.59
2.66
2.92
2.98
Chronically Absent
16.3%
15.2%
10.8%
10.4%
At Least One Disciplinary Action
18.9%
19.7%
11.8%
11.1%
Dropout Rate
2.2%
0.9%
0.5%
0.3%
12th Graders Earning Standard Diploma
73.2%
85.6%
91.8%
95.0%
At Least One Accelerated Course
24.3%
25.1%
41.3%
40.4%
Bright Futures Eligible Seniors
20.7%
19.5%
29.2%
31.7%
Performance Indicator
Average GPA
Source: 2011-12 CAPE Evaluation Report
111
Benefits for Students Taking CTE
• “Applied” academics (Relevance/Rigor)
– Academic Credit
• PA/Fine Arts list
• Science Credit
• Application opportunities (Relationship)
– CTSO - leadership/scholarship/Competitions
– Internships, shadowing, business and industry
• Postsecondary opportunities
– Dual enrollment
– Articulated credit
• Industry Certifications (Rigor)
– Career Readiness
– Articulated credit
– Graduation Requirements
What Industry Certifications
“Do” For Schools…
• Bonus Funding for Program
• Teacher Bonuses
• School Grade Calculation
Industry Certifications
• Federal or state regulatory agency-developed assessment
instrument leading to licensure (FAA, Dept. of Health, DBPR);
• Industry-developed assessment instrument leading to industry
certification (ASE, HVAC Excellence);
• Industry-developed end-of-program assessments (NATEF);
• Proprietary company-developed assessment instrument
leading to certification or proficiency in one or more company
product (Microsoft, CISCO); and
• Third-party-developed assessment instrument (NOCTI, ASK
Institute, Brainbench).
Descriptions by Certification Title
8
Industry Certification and Standard High
School Diploma
s. 1003.4282, F.S. – Requirements for a standard
high school diploma
…Lots of changes!!!!!
9
High School Diploma Designations
• Scholar Designation – Students must satisfy additional
course and assessment requirements.
– Prescribed math (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2 and Statistics)
& science (Biology, Chemistry or Physics and an Equally Rigorous
Science), pass all EOCs, 2 years of the same Foreign Language.
• Merit Designation – Students must attain one or more
industry certifications from the industry certification
funding list pursuant to s.1003.492, F.S.
These are designations ---- The standard diploma still remains.
A student may earn both designations!
10
Core Credit for CTE…
• NEW --- Industry certification courses that
lead to college credit may substitute for up to
two math credits and up to one science credit.
(may not substitute for Algebra 1, Geometry,
or Biology)
• Only certifications on the Gold Standards
Articulation list “count”
• May not be accepted by SUS
11
Cape Legislation and Overview
Career and Professional Education Act
• Established by section 1003.493, F.S.
– Research-based program that integrates a rigorous academic
curriculum with an industry-specific curriculum aligned directly
to priority workforce needs as established by regional workforce
boards
• Funding is included in the Florida Education Finance
Program (FEFP)
– Up to 0.3 additional FTE earned for each student who is enrolled
in a CAPE Academy (2012-13 and earlier) or career-themed
course and who is issued the highest level of industry
certification
– School Grades – Accelerated Coursework
13
Career and Professional Education Act
The first year of implementation for the CAPE Act was 2007-08. By 2008-09 all districts
were required to register at least one career academy. Career-themed courses were
added in 2012-13.
2007-08
Number of Registered Career and
Professional High School Academies
246
2008-09
490
2009-10
838
2011-12
2010-11
1,298
Number of Registered Career and
Professional Middle School Academies
2012-13
1,511
1,729
56
186
Total
246
490
838
1,298
1,567
1,915
Number of Districts with Registered High
School Academies
38
66
681
681
681
671
9
33
Number of Districts with Registered
Middle School Academies
Number of Industry Certifications
Attempted2
1,112
3,592
29,906
49,514
57,400
72,111
Number of Industry Certifications Earned2
954
2,732
16,408
33,523
45,447
56,992
Pass Rate
85.8%
76.1%
54.9%
67.2%
79.2%
79%
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CAPE Academy Enrollment and Industry
Certifications Earned by Secondary Students
CAPE Academy Enrollment and Industry Certifications Earned by Secondary Students
Total Enrollment: High School and Middle School*
Total Certs Earned
250,000
232,944
225,000
187,396
200,000
175,000
154,327
150,000
125,000
102,430
100,000
75,000
57,127
53,324
45,447
50,000
25,000
33,255
20,492
954
16,408
2,732
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13*
* Unduplicated count of students enrolled in at least one CAPE academy based on preliminary Survey 5 data reported as of Sept 8, 2013 . (Source: Career and Professional
Academy Enrollment and Performance Report and EIAS)
Statutory Requirements in s. 1003.493
Each Career and Professional Academy and Secondary School offering a
“Career-themed Course” must:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Provide a rigorous standards-based academic curriculum integrated with a
career theme;
Include one or more partnerships with postsecondary institutions,
businesses, industry, employers, economic development organizations, or
other appropriate partners from the local community;
Promote and provide opportunities for students to earn at a minimum
Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars awards;
Provide instruction in high skill, high wage, and high demand careers;
Deliver instruction relevant to the applicable career, including intensive
reading and mathematics intervention;
Offer applied courses that combine academic content with technical skills;
Provide instruction resulting in competency, certification, or credentials in
workplace skills;
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Statutory Requirements in s. 1003.493
•
•
A “career-themed course” is a course, or a course in a
series of courses, that leads to an industry certification
identified in the Industry Certification Funding List
pursuant to rules adopted by the State Board of
Education. Career-themed courses have industryspecific curriculum aligned directly to priority workforce
needs established by the regional workforce board or
the Department of Economic Opportunity.
Career-themed courses may be any course in the course
code directory.
17
Registered Career-themed Courses
• Districts are required to annually register the
career-themed courses that meet the
requirements of s. 1003.493, F.S.
• Superintendents certify that each CTC meets
all of the requirements in statute.
• List of all registered CTC’s are published as
Appendix FF in the K-12 database dictionary
• Registration process does not generate an
identifier
CTCs: Statutory Requirements in s.
1003.493
• School districts shall offer at least two career-themed
courses
• Each secondary school is encouraged to offer at least one
career-themed course.
• CTC’s must meet the same criteria as a CAPE academy.
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Registered Academies
• Districts are required to annually register the career and
professional academies that meet the requirements of s.
1003.493, F.S.
• Registration window is between July 15 and September
15 for High School academies and September 16 to
October 15 for Middle School academies.
• Superintendents certify that each registered academy
meets all of the requirements in statute.
• Registration process creates a 3-digit identifier for the
academy
– This identifier is used to identify students enrolled in
the academy and reported in Surveys 2, 3, and 5
• Academies must be re-registered each year.
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Which Industry Certifications “Count”?
“The Lists”
• Perkins IV Technical Skill Attainment Inventory
(Secondary Programs)
• Comprehensive Industry Certification List
• Industry Certification Funding List
22
Comprehensive Industry
Certification List
• Department of Economic Opportunity(DEO) creates and
maintains comprehensive list of highest and best industryrecognized certifications.
• Must be approved by Workforce Florida, Inc.
• Includes certifications that may not be earned by students at
the secondary level, although the student may take
introductory coursework leading to the certification
• Additional industry certifications may be recommended to the
Department of Economic Opportunity or Workforce Florida,
Inc. by regional workforce boards and career and professional
academies.
• Serves as the basis for the annual “Industry Certification
Funding List”
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CAPE Funding List
• http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/fcpea/pdf/
1314icfl.pdf
http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/fcpea/pdf/1314icfl.pdf
Industry Certification Funding List
• Created by the Division of Career and Adult
Education
• Approved by the State Board of Education each year
• For inclusion:
– The certification shall be on the “Comprehensive Industry Certification
List.”
– The certification shall be achievable by secondary students.
– The certification shall require a minimum of 150 hours of instruction.
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CAPE Funding List
Certifications must be on the CAPE Funding List
to:
– Generate Bonus Funding
– Generate Teacher Bonus
Differentiations
• Board was given the authority to differentiate
age, work experience and other requirements
– Would allow SBE to exempt certain non-exam
requirements, if appropriate (Example – ASE)
– Student must still pass all exam requirements
• Exemptions are noted on the 2013-14 ICFL.
FEFP – Weights for Industry Certifications
Earned in 2013-14 and forward
• Industry Certifications with a statewide articulation
agreement are weighted 0.2
• Industry Certifications without a statewide
articulation agreement are weighted 0.1
30
Estimated “Bonus” Funds per
Certification
2013-14 FEFP
• Bonus FTE (0.1) x BSA ($3,752.30) = Bonus Funds $375.23
• Bonus FTE (0.2) x BSA ($3,752.30) = Bonus Funds $750.46
• Bonus FTE (0.3) x BSA ($3,752.30) = Bonus Funds $1,125.69
– Note: 0.3 weight has been eliminated for the 14-15 FEFP calculation
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2013-14 FEFP Calculation
• One time, catch-up payment for students
enrolled in 2012-13 who earned certifications
in 2009-10, 2010-11, and 2011-12
• For one year, funding will be included for
middle school students who earned industry
certifications on the Industry Certification
Funding List or the Middle School STEM
Industry Certification List
Other
• New language was added to prevent
supplanting of funds from add-on FTE:
– Each district must allocate at least 80 percent of
the funds provided for industry certification, in
accordance with this paragraph, to the program
that generated the funds. This allocation may not
be used to supplant funds provided for basic
operation of the program.
Teacher Bonus – New Language
• New Teacher Bonus Language added:
• For industry certifications earned in the 2013-2014 school year and
in subsequent years, the school district shall distribute to each
classroom teacher who provided direct instruction toward the
attainment of an industry certification that qualified for additional
full-time equivalent membership under subparagraph 1.
• a. A bonus in the amount of $25 for each student taught by a
teacher who provided instruction in a course that led to the
attainment of an industry certification on the Industry Certification
Funding List with a weight of 0.1.
• b. A bonus in the amount of $50 for each student taught by a
teacher who provided instruction in a course that led to the
attainment of an industry certification on the Industry Certification
Funding List with a weight of 0.2.
Teacher Bonus
• For certifications earned 2013-14 and later
• Applies to additional FTE funding received in
the 2014-15 FEFP
• A portion of the funds provided in s.
1011.62(1)(o), F.S. must be distributed in
accordance with the new teacher bonus
language
Teacher Bonus – Implementation
Recommendation
• Districts should be developing processes internally
for identifying teachers whose instruction leads to
the attainment of an industry certification.
• All teachers whose instruction leads to the
industry certification attainment must receive the
bonus
• Considerations….
– The district may not be able to rely upon the teacher
of record for the final course in which the certification
was reported.
Reporting of Certifications
All certifications should still be reported even if
the student has already reached their 0.3 cap.
Schools may still receive credit towards school
grades calculation.
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Industry Certification and Articulation
Agreements
• Since 2009, 117 Gold Standard Career Pathways Articulation
Agreements have been established and incorporated in State
Board of Education Rule 6A-10.0401.
– 92 certifications
– 109 Agreements allow students to earn between 3 to 9
hours of college credit depending on the certification and
program
– 8 Agreements allow students to earn 10 to 36 hours of
college credit depending on the certification and program
– http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/dwdframe/artic_indcert2
aas.asp
Statewide Articulation Agreements:
Example
• Certification: MSSC Certified Production
Technician
Agreements and Estimated Tuition Savings for Each Program
Associate Degree
Program
Number of
Articulated
Credits
Estimated Tuition
Savings*
Electronics Engineering
Technology
6
$624
Engineering Technology
15
$1,560
Manufacturing
Technology
9
$936
*Based on Florida College System average tuition and
fees of $104 per credit hour
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Web Resources
•
DOE Website – CAPE Act
http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/fcpea/default.asp
–
Industry Certification Funding Lists and Career and Professional
Academy registration site are available here.
•
Workforce Florida, Inc- Comprehensive Industry Certification List
http://www.workforceflorida.com/PrioritiesInitiatives/EducationalIniti
atives/cape.php
Comprehensive Industry Certification List is available here.
•
Carl D. Perkins Technical Skill Attainment Inventories
http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/perkins/perkins_resources.asp
–
See Header for Secondary and Postsecondary Technical Skill
Attainment Inventory
–
This information is also posted in Appendix Z
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Web Resources
•
•
•
6A-6.0573, F.A.C.-- Industry Certification Process
https://www.flrules.org/gateway/readFile.asp?sid=
0&tid=7490357&type=1&file=6A-6.0573.doc
Industry Certification
http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/indcert.asp
–
New webpage which includes links to:
• CAPE page
• Office of School Grades
• Statewide Articulation Agreements
• Industry Certification Descriptions web tool
– http://app1.fldoe.org/WEIndCert/Default.aspx
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Key Contacts
Program
•
Tara Goodman, Division of Career and Adult Education
⁻
Email: [email protected]
⁻
Phone: 850-245-9001
•
Tara McLarnon, Division of Career and Adult Education
⁻
Email: [email protected]
⁻
Phone: 850-245-9005
Data Reporting
•
Tsung-Yuan Lin
⁻
Email: [email protected]
⁻
Phone: 850-245-9074
School Grades Calculation Only
•
Ed Croft
⁻
Email: [email protected]
⁻
Phone: 850-245-0429
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Other information of note….
CTE and Academic Credit
• 13 CTE courses are coded EQ – meet the
equally rigorous science requirement
CTE Courses for Equally Rigorous (EQ) Science
Credit (2013-14)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aerospace Technologies 1 (8600580)
Aerospace Technologies 2 (8600680)
Aerospace Technologies 3 (8600780)
Agriscience Foundations 1 (8106810)
Agricultural Biotechnology 3 (81068860)
Aquaculture 2 (8112010)
Aquaculture 3 (8112020)
Biotechnology 1 (3027010)
Biotechnology 2 (3027020)
Human Body Systems (8708120)
Introduction to Alternative Energy (8006120)
Medical Interventions (8708130)
Principles of Biomedical Science (8708110)
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Professional Development
Opportunities from DCAE
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DCAE PD Opportunities for 13-14
1. Professional Development Institute (PDI)
2. Academic Alignment – Spring 2014
3. CTE Core Integration Institute - Spring 2014
4. Career and Technical Education Reading (CATER) - Spring 2014
5. Florida Association of Career and Technical Educators (FACTE) Online
Courses - Fall/Spring 2013-14 http://facte.org
6. Florida’s State Standards/CTE Frameworks Training – Regional
Summer/Fall 2014
7. FACTE State Summer Conference – July 2014
8. Other targeted PD as requested
http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/profdev.asp
48
Questions ????
Contact Information
Jodi Tillman
Public Schools Liaison
Florida Department of Education
[email protected]
850.245.9439
49

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