Slide 1

Report
21st Annual Conference
E-Waste: Trends, Challenges & Legislation
Sims Metal Management Limited
ASX Code: SGM
NYSE Code: SMS
WasteMINZ Conference – New Zealand
Kumar Radhakrishnan
Sr. Vice President - APAC
15/10/2009
Agenda
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction
E-Waste - Trends & Challenges
Legislation
Lessons from Global Experience
Conclusion
Sims Recycling Solutions (SRS)
• Subsidiary of Sims Metal Management (SPM in NZ) – $ 7
billion revenue and public listed on ASX / NYSE
• The world’s largest electronics recovery and recycling
company - 34 processing facilities world-wide
• 400,000 tonnes of EEE recycled & recovered annually
• Many facilities “multi-service”
 Carbon neutral when savings versus virgin material
exploitation are taken into account
 One of Innovest’s Global 100 most sustainable companies
2009 (released at the Davos Summit 2009)
 SRS presented the 2009 Market Leadership Award to Sims
Recycling Solutions for demonstrating unrivalled thought
and experiential leadership in the electronics waste
recycling market by Frost & Sullivan
Global Operations – Sims Recycling Solutions
Illinois
2 Operations
Canada
1 Operations
EU
13 Operations
Asia
Representative
offices
California
3 Operations
Singapore
1 Operation
Arizona 1
Operation
Australia
5 Operations
Nevada
1 Operation
Louisiana
1 Operation
South
Carolina
1 Operation
Tennessee
1 Operation
India
1 Operation
Florida
1 Operation
New Zealand
1 Operation
34 Operations Globally
5
E-Waste – Trends, Challenges & Legislation
Sims Metal Management Limited
ASX Code: SGM
NYSE Code: SMS
6
E-Waste :Trends & Challenges
• Definition
– E-Waste or WEEE
• Trends
– Volumes
– Targets & Collections
– Complexity of new products
• Challenges
– Technical
– Commercial
– Enforcement
Courtesy – WEEE Man
Europe
 1 EU Directive, 27 different interpretations
• 27 registration regimes, 27 reporting frameworks
 Limits economies of scale and creates difficulties for both
recyclers and obligated producers
For Instance:
– TFS regs.– Apply within EU - Barrier to trade, adds cost
 “Co-mingling” working and BER units makes the whole load waste
 Crossing borders with “waste loads” can require special paperwork
 Permitting Regulations for transport and processing – 1EU
Directive---27 different permitting systems
 Recycling and Reuse targets higher in revised WEEE
directive
8
USA
 Of 50 States, 18 and NYC have passed legislation
– Products covered vary (all cover monitors)
– 17 are EPR but California is ARF
– Of the EPR’s, some require producers to pay for collection and
transportation , others do not
– All require producers to provide some funds for recycling.
– Some ban prison labour, some don’t
 Export is controlled by Feds, and controls are absent, but CA will
not pay for recycling done out-of-State
 Permitting – State EPA’s apply differing and varying permits
9
Australia
 No national legislation
 Adhoc export permits
 Any investment is at recycler’s risk but industry and producers
have been ready for sometime and waiting for government action
 Choice Modelling study confirms consumer willingness to pay
for recycling beyond any doubt
 Stakeholder consultation on various options have been held
 EPHC to make decision in November
10
Asia
 Japan
 “Home Appliance Recycling Law” financed by consumer
 Voluntary collection scheme for IT equipment




Korea – “Act for Recycling of EEE and ELV”
Taiwan – Waste Disposal Law / Recycling Management Fund
China and India have issued draft e-waste guidelines
Main concerns
 Huge “back yard” industry leaves little scope for industrialised
operators
 Illegal shipments from West keep back yard operators busy
 Immature Environmental, Health and Safety standards, with differing
requirements everywhere
 Shipments to Asia carry big risk with data security, IP protection,
OH&S, environmental outcome etc.
11
Lessons from Global Experience
• Focus on recycling standards
Consumer
Waste bin
– Environmental benefits flow from landfill
diversion and resource recovery only
when appropriate standards are met
• Enforce export restrictions to support
standards, otherwise
– Material will flow abroad with adverse
carbon emissions impacts
– Will be recycled inefficiently in back yard
cottage industries
Retailer
Municipal site
2nd hand market place
Trader
• Promote reuse
• Set targets for collection and
Export
benchmark against world standards
• Minimize administrative requirements
• One national scheme
Unauthorised
Treatment
• No cherry picking
Collection centre
Transport
Export
Authorised
Treatment
Accounted for
Unaccounted for
New Zealand – Where are WEEE now?





Voluntary schemes do not create a level playing field
E-waste not a priority product
Random collection events locally
One National “E-Day” collection event per year
Mostly B2B arisings from a few responsible OEMs and
local companies
 Donations to charities
13
Conclusion - Can these be applied in NZ?
• Mandatory product stewardship schemes do exist
• EU have moved on from WEEE to RoHS, REACH, EuP,
Battery Directive…….
• Countries with comparable population i.e. Ireland,
Denmark, Finland etc recycle 35,000 – 60,000 MT of
WEEE annually
• Solutions are readily available
• Political will required
Thank You
Sims Metal Management Limited
ASX Code: SGM
NYSE Code: SMS
21st Annual Conference

similar documents