Document

Report
Dementia
and
Palliative Care
Palliative Care
The world health organization (WHO) defines
palliative care as the following:
Palliative care is an approach that improves the
quality of life of patients and their families facing
the problems associated with life-threatening
illness, through the prevention and relief of
suffering by means of early identification and
impeccable assessment and treatment of pain
and other problems, physical, psychosocial and
spiritual.
Key Principles
• Focus on quality of life which includes good
symptom control
• Whole person approach taking into account the
person’s past life experiences and current situation
• Care which encompasses both the person with the
life threatening disease and those that matter to
them
• Respect for person’s autonomy and choice
• Emphasis on open and sensitive communication,
which extends to patients, informal carers and
professional colleagues
Palliative Care Approach in
Dementia
Why?
• Equity
• Approach is
suitable/helpful
• Similar needs
• Focus on quality
not quantity
•
•
•
•
•
Access
Trajectory
Communication
Symptom experience
Ability to participate
in care
• Relationships
• Autonomy
Trajectory
Dementia
Cancer
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Confusion
Incontinence
Pain
low mood
constipation
loss of appetite
How Do We Address the
Challenges?
•
•
•
•
Recognition
Clinical science
Communication
Education
•
•
•
•
Environment
Values
Ethics
Partnership
Palliative Care Approach in
Dementia
‘You matter because you are
you, and you matter until the
last moment of your life’
Dame Cecily Saunders
Mission statement
St. Christopher’s hospice

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