Mixtures

Report
Chapter 9.3 Part 1
Key concepts:
• Describe 3 properties of mixtures
• Describe 4 methods of separating mixtures
• Give everyday examples of mixtures
Key Vocabulary:
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Mixture
Concentration
Solubility
Suspension
Colloid
Solvent
Solute
Solution
Imagine a world of legos:
Make up compounds
and mixtures:
Mixtures:
What does
pure mean?
How is this
different from
an compound?
What are
some
examples of
chemical and
physical
changes?
• A mixture is a combination of two
or more substances that are not
chemically combined.
• How are mixtures different from
compounds?
– They form a mixture when they don’t
chemically react like a compound
• Think about trial mix or a pizza…
– Can you taste the tomato pasta?
Meat?
SAY WHAT!
• What does it mean to not be chemically
combined?
– Example?
– When you do chemically combines it, what happens?
– Why do mixture’s substances keep their individual
properties while compounds don’t?
• How many atoms are in the following samples?
– CaCO3
– C6H12O6
– NaCl
Got to keep them separated!
Know figure 1
on page 244
• You can separate mixtures
physically.
– What about compounds?
• When discussing ratios of elements
that make up mixtures,
it is not definite, like
compounds
Quick Questions:
• Infer
– How does separating blood into several layers in a
centrifuge show that blood is a mixture instead of
a pure substance?
Demonstration time:
HYPOTHESIS
• How can I separate these?
– What do you think?
– What would you do?
• Can all mixtures be separated easily?
– “Chemicals can form mixtures, but no
chemical change happens when a
mixture is made. That means that each
chemical keeps its original identity. The
pepperoni and olives on the pizza don’t
change when they are mixed. Making a
mixture is a physical change.”
Compound vs. Mixture!
What are
some
similarities and
differences
between
compounds
and mixtures?
Compounds:
Mixtures:
Quick question:
• How is the ratio of components in a mixture
different from the ratio of elements in a
compound?
What mixtures do you know of?
• You are surrounded by mixtures. Mixtures
make up the food you eat, the school supplies
you use, and the clothes you wear. AND
MOST IMPORTANTLY…US!
• What have you seen or heard of?
Review:
• How do mixtures differ from elements and
compounds?
• How can mixtures be separated?
Homework:
• Vocabulary cards for the following term:
– Mixture

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