Making Feedback Count

Report
Making Feedback Count
Closing the Gap
Overview of value for money
Promising
10
May be
worth it
Effect Size (months gain)
Feedback
Meta-cognitive
Pre-school
Peer tutoring
1-1 tutoring
Homework
0
£0
Summer
schools
Parental
AfL
involvement
Learning Individualised
Sports
learning
styles
Arts
Performance
Ability grouping
pay
Cost per pupil
ICT
Smaller
classes
After
school
Not
worth it
£1000
Teaching
assistants
Dylan Wiliam: "What works? is never the right
question. It should be, what works
where?And for whom? Teaching is
complicated"
Key features of Assessment Framework:
- 1 in 6 feedback
- Written feedback
- Oral feedback
- Whole class oral feedback
- Self-assessment
- Peer assessment
Planning for progression
•
•
•
Starting point - what can they already do.
Set initial targets for progress.
Mini-milestone - what can they do with
extra knowledge and skills? Formative
assessment.
End of unit - redraft mini, measure
progress and provide summative
feedback
Formative assessment
Written Feedback
• take the form of an enabling comment
• highlight what has been done well in terms of achieving the learning objectives
• point out ways in which to improve and to access the next level or grade
• Providing a clear written target that relates specifically to the assessment criteria
• Using specific, accurate and clear comments (eg. "It was good because you..." rather than just "correct", or "to improve
you should..." rather than comments about presentation of work or levels of effort)
• Using a diagnostic grid, marking successes and areas for improvement against grade or level criteria for students to work
out where they currently are, and what steps to take next
• Reviewing how much progress has been made on targets set by the students or their peers (eg. "I can see that you
focused on improving X as it is much better than last time's Y...")
1.Diagnostic grids (levels/grades and criteria)
2.WWW/EBI or 2 stars and 1 wish
3.Posing questions that they have to answer
4.Strategies to include the students and reduce workload!
Improving written feedback
Diagnostic grids
DIRT
Directed Improvement and Reflection Time
1.A questionnaire to explore areas to
improve on, effort levels, how will I
revise?
2.Answer the questions that you have
posed
3.Redraft a section to make the
suggested improvements
4.Create differentiated lessons for
different groups of learners
5.Double mark their progress
AfL - informing your teaching
1.Seating plans
2.Home and away groups
3.Differentiated lessons
Double marking
Peer marking
Oral Feedback
• can
be used to provide the same information as written feedback
• engages learners in a coaching-style dialogue framed around identifying options
and best ways forward
• can result from learners’ reflection on their learning
• should be recorded by students in exercise books or on their work as
appropriate, to provide evidence of feedback given
Market place
1.Bright ideas sheets
2.Sign up for follow up from me on a specific area
Useful links
A great post by Tom Sherrington, with useful strategies to ‘close the marking gap’:
http://headguruteacher.com/2012/06/17/264/
Useful OFSTED case study: http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/good-practice-resource-making-marking-matter
The original research about AFL that is still required reading for teachers: Inside the Black Box’, by Black and Wiliam –
https://www.measuredprogress.org/documents/10157/15653/InsideBlackBox.pdf

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