Slide 1

Report
• Another way U.S. immigrants are
assimilated: Weight gain
• Bad news for new Americans: A study published
today shows that simply moving to the USA packs on
the pounds.
The immigrant experience suggests
that:
‘North-South Health Divide
is widest for 40 years’ Feb 2011
• 1/5 more likely to die early
(>75)
• 1.5 million extra deaths since
1965
• Smoking main cause (14%)
• Built and natural environment
vs socioeconomic?
• Recession?
Burgoine et al., (2011) Assessing the obesogenic
environment of North East England, Health &
Place
• Availability of food consumed within the
home
• Availability of food consumed outside of the
home
• Residential density
• Street connectivity
• Land use mix
Explained 16.2% of risk of being overweight
Environment & Health
Freiburg, Germany
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1970s Nuclear plant turned down – local alternatives
CO2 target 25% reduction of 1992 levels
400km cycle lanes, 1/3 journeys by bicycle, 35% no car
140,000 tonnes (1988) – 50,000 tonnes of waste
42% of territory is nature reserve
€1,000,000,000 turnover in Environment Sector
Cross Street South
Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)
Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) has
been defined as: “the formalised, systematic
and comprehensive process of evaluating the
environmental impacts of a policy, plan or
programme and alternatives, preparing a
written report on the findings, and using the
findings in publicly accountable decisionmaking” Therivel (2004).
SEA in relation to health
“ The likely significant effects on the environment,
including on issues such as biodiversity, population,
human health, fauna, flora, soil, water, air, climatic
factors, material assets, cultural heritage including
architectural and archaeological heritage, landscape
and the interrelationship between the above factors.
These effects should include secondary, cumulative,
synergistic, short, medium, and long-term permanent
and temporary, positive and negative effects. ”
•Source: Annex I (f),
•SEA Directive 2001/42/EC
SEA: to what does it apply?
Land Use and Spatial
Plans:
Local Development
Documents
Minerals Plans
Waste Plans
•Non-Planning:
•Regional Economic Strategies
•Transport Plans
•Community Strategies
•Waste Strategy 2000
•AONB Management Plans
•Oil and Gas Licensing Rounds
Examples of actions requiring SEA
Plan
National
Regional
Local
Salmon Action
Plans
Regional
Economic
Strategies
Minerals Local
Plan
Water Company Regional
Resource Plans Transport
Strategies
Programme Offshore
Windfarm
Licensing
Rounds
River Basin
Management
Programmes
of Measures
Local Air
Quality Action
Plans
Flood
Alleviation
Strategies
Why is a health response required?
•Protecting human health
•Lifelong health improvements
•The institutionalisation of health policies
•Coordination of action
•The elimination of costs of treating health
consequences of non-health policies
•Greater equity in health
•Reallocation of resources
•Health poorly assessed
Stages of SEA
A: Screening + Baseline
B: Scoping + Alternatives
Health input
• Which?
C: Impact Assessment
• When?
• Who?
D: Environmental Report
E: Monitoring
• How?
Draft Guidance on Health in SEA
•Aims of the Guidance
To inform the health community
•how to get involved
•when to get involved
•what data to provide
To inform planners/
Responsible Authorities
•who/when to consult health
•what data are available and
•health determinants to consider
during scoping
•http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Consultations/Closedconsultations/DH_073261
Health in Types of Plans and Programmes
Health evidence
Stages of SEA
The new system
Planners should ‘approve all individual
proposals wherever possible’
Developments should go ahead ‘unless the
adverse impacts of allowing development
would significantly and demonstrably
outweigh the benefits’
Planners should support ‘strategies for the
growth of ports, airports or other major
generators of travel demand in their areas’
Timeline
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Draft published July 2011
Comments October 2011 (>10,000 received)
CLG Committee Report December 2011
DCLG has indicated that the new national
Replace Planning Policy Statements (PPSs) and
Planning Policy Guidance notes(PPGs)
• > 1,000 to ~ 50 pages
• Planning policy published April 2012
Key issues
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Sustainable development
Brevity vs ambiguity
Transition period
Public participation
Green light to development
‘Significantly and demonstrably’
Placeless
The three pillars of sustainability
economic
15%
environmental
social
60%
25%
http://www.apho.org.uk/default.aspx?QN=P_HIA
The more familiar ‘deficit’ approach
focuses on the problems, needs and
deficiencies in a community. It
designs services to fill the gaps and
fix the problems. As a result, a
community can feel disempowered
and dependent; people can become
passive recipients of expensive
services rather than active agents in
their own and their families’ lives.
http://www.nice.org.uk/Guidance/PHG/Wave20/55
The evidence
• NICE’s Spatial Planning and Health Programme
Development Group
– The location, density and mix of land uses
– Street layout and connectivity
– Access to public services, employment, local fresh food and
other services
– Safety and security
– Extreme weather events and a changing climate
– Open and green space
– Affordable and energy efficient housing
– Air quality and noise
– Community interaction
– Transport
12 ACTIONS
http://www.spahg.org.uk/
ACTION 1: DESIGNING IN HEALTH
• Develop local development documents with core strategies
that provide the policy direction to address public health and
health inequalities.
• Develop Supplementary Planning Guidance on healthy living
to address matters such as fast food outlets, design and site
layout principles, contributions to physical activity including
green gyms and access to public space etc
• Consult the local Director of Public Health on the possible
health effects of the plan
• Recognise that change can take time and thus provide a
consistent long term vision to help guide that change.
• Ensure that there is collaboration between and within local
authorities boundaries and in partnership with other
organizations to address health and health inequalities at an
appropriate scale.
ACTION 3: LOCAL DEVELOPMENT
FRAMEWORKS AND CORE STRATEGIES
• Ensure that the Local Development Framework (LDF)
includes specific health policies
• Ensure that the LDF includes the spatial aspects of
change required to implement the Sustainable
Community Strategy and meet the health goals it has
defined.
• Set out how public and private resources (including
changes to land, buildings, transport and associated
infrastructure) should be used to improve health.
• Ensure that the Director of Public Health comments
upon how the Local Development Framework addresses
local health objectives.
ACTION 6: INTEGRATING HEALTH
ASSESSMENT
•Involve the Public Health lead for spatial planning
•Use appropriate evidence that may include: routine health and other data; the annual
public health report; the JSNA; and available literature reviews;
•Identify the views of the local community, for example using findings of consultation on
the proposal.
•Identify which populations will bear each impact and ensure differential impacts are
identified
•Examine alternative options to safeguard health and wellbeing in both short and longer
term
•Make recommendations based on the findings to enhance positive and minimise
negative impacts on health and inequalities
•Seek to alter the plan in light of the findings and recommendations
•Recommend appropriate monitoring of the impacts of the plan and the
implementation of the mitigation or enhancement measures.
•Present findings clearly in a report showing the evidence sources and basis of the
recommendations; and draft a summary ‘user friendly’ version
•Undertake the assessment at early a stage as possible in the process.
ACTION 10: HEALTH AND PLANNING
CAPACITY AND COLLABORATION
• The Director of Public Health/Public Health Service, the environmental
health service and the Chief Planning Officer should designate staff to
ensure health and wellbeing is fully integrated into each local authority’s
spatial planning process.
• The DPH or Public Health spatial planning lead should agree with
planning authorities how to ensure appropriate scrutiny of health
assessments of planning proposals.
• The Public Health Service/ DPHs should create local networks for public
health leads on spatial planning, offering regular and informal
opportunities to meet with planning staff from local authorities and
share information and good practice.
• Health and Wellbeing Boards/ Community Planning Partnerships should
assess capacity and collaboration across all the relevant organizations
and make recommendations as to how capacity can be developed
particularly in encouraging GP consortia/NHS boards to engage with
spatial planning and non-clinical issues .
Using wood for energy
Role Play

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