9/22/2014 - Nutley Public Schools

Report
9/22/2014
Do Now – 9/22/2014
In your notebooks,
explain in 1-2 sentences
what theme is.
Then, provide an
example.
Agenda
• Do Now
• Share out
• Themes in literature
• TKAM Theme -
Partner Work
• Chapter 2
THEME
What is a Theme?
Theme: what the story teaches readers about life
or human nature.
A theme is not a word, it is a sentence.
Examples
Money can’t buy happiness.
Don’t judge people based on the surface.
It is better to die free than live under tyranny.
COMMON THEMES IN
LITERATURE
1. How is justice decided?
2. How do we know who we really are?
3. Where do we fit into society?
4. What does it mean to be a hero or antihero?
Anti hero is a main character who has the goals of a hero,
but has different morals.
5. What does it mean to be a “survivor?”
7. How do I deal with loneliness and
despair?
8.
What does tomorrow’s world hold for us?
9. How do we deal with all
different types of love?
• Friend Love
• Self-centered love
• Love of Country
• Game-Playing
• Admiration
• Unrequited love
• Possessiveness
• Godly love
• Physical Love
• Familial love
• Romance
• Infatuation
• Logical Type Love
• Jealousy
10. Where do we find the strength to be
brave/courageous in tough circumstances?
TKAM THEMES
With the person next to you…
• Work with a partner sitting next
to you to identify what you think
will be one of the major themes
from the book.
• Write your answers on the
construction paper provided.
• Do not move your seats.
• You may not work alone.
• Be sure to support your claims
with one piece of textual
evidence (with page number!)
For example:
Bravery means standing up for what you believe in, even if
it means negative consequences.
For example: The two men who refuse to plead guilty to a
lesser charge.
Share Out
TKAM CHAPTER 2
Homework
• Read Chapter 2 and
come up with one
question per page of
reading!
• Chapter 2 is 8 pages.
• 8 pages = 8 questions.
9/23/2014
Do Now – 9/23/2014
In your notebooks,
answer this question in
3-5 sentences:
What does the
conversation with Ms.
Caroline and Walter say
about Ms. Caroline?
What is the purpose of
her character?
Agenda
• Do Now
• Share out
• Words of the Wiser
• Practice
• Chapter 3
• Homework
STOP, NOTICE AND NOTE
SIGNPOSTS - READING ON
THE ROAD
What is this?
• A signpost – an object or idea
that helps you know where
you’re going or what you
should be doing while on the
route.
• Think of reading a novel as
something similar to being on
a road.
• The author has already paved
the road for you, but it is up to
you to read the signs to figure
out where you should go and
what you should do.
SIGNPOST #1 – WORDS
OF THE WISER
Words of the Wiser
Stop and Notice and Note
Words
of the
Wiser
• When you’re reading and a
character (who is probably
older and a lot wiser) takes
the main character aside
and gives serious advice,
you should ask yourself:
• What’s the life lesson,
and how might it affect
the character?
• Whatever the lesson is,
you’ve just found a
theme.
For Example… on the sheet…
How might this affect the
character?
If Hazel takes it into
consideration, she will
learn that there was
meaning to Gus’
existence, and that our
lives and our energy
helps to create new
energy and life.
Part I – Van Houten: All
cells come from cells.
Every cell is born of a
previous cell, which was
born of a previous cell.
Life comes from life. Life
begets life begets life
begets life…” (276)
Now You… 4 minutes…
• Read the 2nd part on
the back of the sheet…
• As you read the
second part of the
excerpt, jot down an
answer to this question
on the side of your
paper: How might this
advice affect the
character?
TKAM CHAPTER 3
Chapter 3 Reading
• As we read, write
down the words of the
wiser on the sheet
provided.
• That’s your homework,
as well.
Homework
• Read the rest of
Chapter 3 and come
up with one question
per page of reading!
9/24/2014
Do Now – 9/24/2014
• Do you think bending
the law is fair in some
cases?
• Why do you think
Atticus says this to
Scout about Burris
Ewell?
Agenda
• Do Now
• Share out
• Characterization
• Characterization and
Words of the Wiser
• Chapter 4
• Homework
LEARNING ABOUT
CHARACTERS
Direct and Indirect Characterization
Direct Characterization
• direct characterization: the author or narrator
makes direct statements about a character’s
traits. The author tells us about the character’s
personality to our face.
• TELLING
• Example:
• “The patient boy and quiet girl were both well mannered
and did not disobey their mother.”
• Explanation: The boy is “patient” and the girl is “quiet.”
Indirect Characterization
• Indirect characterization: the author or narrator
reveals a character’s traits through his or her actions
and speech.
• SHOWING
• When Jane walked in the room, nobody could help but
look at her stunning, gorgeous face. She commanded
attention wherever she went due to her good looks.
• Jane is beautiful.
• Jim was very unlike any other businessman. He made
sure that all his clients got what they had paid for.
• Jim is honest and hardworking.
STEAL THOSE TRAITS!
STEAL METHOD
• SPEECH - What does the character say? How does the
character speak?
• THOUGHTS - What is revealed through the character’s private
thoughts and feelings?
• EFFECTS - What is revealed through the character’s effect on
other people? How do other characters feel or behave in
reaction to the character?
• ACTIONS - What does the character do? How does the
character behave?
• LOOKS - What does the character look like? How does the
character dress?
PRACTICE
On your worksheet… Passage I
"Which one is the boy with the
reddish brown hair?" I asked.
"That's Edward. He's gorgeous,
of course, but don't waste your
time. He doesn't date. Apparently
none of the girls here are good
looking enough for him. - pg 22
Type of characterization of
Edward? – Direct (and indirect)
Proof?
Direct: “Reddish brown hair,”
Indirect: He’s picky and choosy
about who he dates.
Reading and watching…
• Go through the second
example from Gatsby on
your worksheet with your
partner and decide
whether or not it is direct
or indirect characterization.
• Then, we’ll watch a video
and you’ll do the same.
• Make sure you provide the
WHY.
• https://www.youtube.co
m/watch?v=mWBWnJM
HEs8&safe=active
TKAM CHAPTER 4
As we read through Chapter 4…
• Pick ONE character
from the book and fill
out the STEAL chart
with examples from the
text.
• That is also your
homework.
9/25/2014
Do Now – 9/25/2014
• What do you make of
the last few lines of
Chapter 4? (LOOK IN
YOUR BOOKS!)
• Please identify who you
think the person is and
how that might change
our understanding of
that character.
Agenda
• Do Now
• Share out
• Types of Conflict
• Chapter 5
• Homework
TYPES OF CONFLICT
Conflict:
A struggle between opposing forces
Characters in conflict form the basis for novels, short stories, and
plays.
EXTERNAL
There are four types of external conflict
External
Person vs. Person
The protagonist fights directly against another character
with apparently opposing aims.
External
Person vs. Nature
This type of conflict pits a story's main character or
characters against a natural force such as a flood,
predatory animal, or disease epidemic.
External
Person Against Society
In many stories, the protagonist battles an unjust element
of government or culture.
External
Person vs. Unknown
• Is considered an External Conflict but usually prompts
an Internal Conflict by raising questions
• This conflict encompasses:
• Man vs. Supernatural
• Man vs. God
• Usually prompts Man vs. Self conflict of either fear or indecisiveness.
INTERNAL
Internal
Person vs. Self
Character struggles to overcome fear, addiction,
emotional damage or other crippling personal issue.
PRACTICE – ON THE
WORKSHEET PROVIDED
Example #1
• Let’s look at page 6, and Scout’s
description of her fight with
Calpurnia:
• “… our battles were epic and one-
sided. Calpurnia always won, mainly
because Atticus always took her
side” (Lee 6)
• Step 1. What kind of conflict?
• Person vs. Person
• Step 2. Impact on the story?
• Calpurnia is set up as a person who
checks Scout’s behavior, acts as a mother
figure, and disciplines her. Calpurnia is
someone very important to Scout and her
family.
CONFLICT IN TKAM
TKAM Chapter 5
• As we read, think of
other types of conflict we
might encounter.
• For homework, please fill
out the rest of the
conflict sheet of conflicts
that we have seen so far.
• You may refer to other
chapters.
TKAM Quiz
• Quiz on chapters 1-5
tomorrow.
• This is not your typical
multiple choice quiz!
• You will be able to use
your book.
• Review your notes from
class this week.
9/26/2014
Do Now
• Take FOUR minutes to
look over your notes
from this week.
• You will be able to use
your book for this quiz.
TKAM Quiz
• Please answer all five
questions.
• Each question is worth
four points.
• Make sure you answer in
complete sentences.
• Partial sentences and partial
answers will get partial credit.
• You will have the entire
period – please use the
time wisely!
START TO READ
CHAPTER 6
I will give you your homework for Monday.

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