Giving feedback - Northeastern University

Report
Performance Management
GIVING FEEDBACK - TOOLKIT
1
Feedback Framework©
• Feedback is essential to a
learning and performance culture
• Clear, specific, real-time works
best
• Provide both positive and
constructive
• Framework assists in preparing to
deliver feedback effectively
Expectations
Outcomes
Observations
Assessments
2
Checklist for effective feedback delivery
1. Anticipate potential
emotions and difficulties
2. Initiate a two-way
conversation to deliver
and receive feedback
3. Evaluate outcomes
and identify solutions
moving forward
 Am I ready to provide
feedback, and have I
acknowledged the emotions
involved?
 Am I in “act” versus “react”
mode?
 Is this the right time to
provide feedback?
 Can I provide balanced
feedback that is specific
and behavioral?
 How can I describe the
impact a specific behavior
had on me and others?
 How can I keep the
conversation focused on
one to two areas for further
improvement?
 Have I allowed the person
an opportunity to present
their side of the situation?
 Do I understand what is
being said and the other
side of the story?
 Do I need more information
before identifying a
solution?
 Have I identified the payoff
and positive outcome of the
desired change in
performance and
behaviors?
 Should I take action or not
on this feedback?
 What would happen if I
and/or my team member
acted upon this feedback?
Opportunities to Deliver Feedback
Objective
Planning
Mid Year
Review
End of Year
Review
One-on-One
Meetings
Staff
Meetings
One Minute
Manager
Start of a
Project
Ad Hoc
Discussions
After
Project Review
Importance & Timing
Here are four key aspects of effective feedback.
Phil Race on University of Southampton website: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/gmoof/files/2013/05/Good-feedback-Stick-Men2.jpg
5
Tips for Giving Feedback
• Think of feedback as an opportunity for mutual understanding
• Provide nonjudgmental information rather than “positive” or “negative”
feedback. Judgments about an associate are likely to elicit defensiveness
• Provide a balanced message to create an opportunity for discussion
• Discuss feedback regularly so that it becomes a process, not an event
• Engage in a dialogue and avoid the tendency to lecture
• Allow periods of silence so people can absorb what you say and respond
• Let go of the need to convince the other person you are right
• Don’t dilute your message with unnecessary qualifiers like “maybe”
“perhaps” and “a little”
• Avoid overwhelming people with too much feedback at one time. Focus on
relevant and significant observations instead of covering every detail

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