the October 7 webinar Power Point

Report
CKES: A Counselor Performance
Evaluation Instrument
Mark Ellis
Karen Griffith
Sloane Molloy
Tinisha Parker
Why do we need CKES?
• Clearly define the role of the professional
school counselor
• Standardize the evaluation of Georgia’s school
counselors
CKES Development
July 2013
Instrument developed by committee of eight (2 Elementary, 2 Middle, 2
High, and 2 District level school counseling professionals, representing
south Georgia, middle Georgia, and the metro area)
November 2013
Instrument shared with a Focus Group of 25 school counseling
professionals at fall conference
February 2014
Revisions made to the instrument based on feedback from Focus Group
February 2014
Rating scale and supporting documents created by committee
February 2014
Revised CKES and supporting documents provided to districts interested in
field testing
April 2014
Survey conducted via CTAE Network
May 2014
Survey conducted and feedback collected from field test participants
2014-2015
Pilot year
Focus Group Results
• 25 participants representing 11 of 12 regions, 17 districts
and all levels
Believes CKES Defines Role
Current Evaluation
25
1
5
20
Teacher
15
Support Staff
2
16
1
Counselor
23
Agree
Unsure
10
Disagree
None
Unsure
5
2
0
• Likes:
– Supports role of counselor in serving students and meeting needs of
school community
– Comprehensive and detailed instrument with examples and artifacts
– Reinforces and informs regarding appropriate role of the counselor
– Alignment with TKES & LKES
– Alignment with ASCA National Model
– Uniformity and standardization across the state
Counselor Survey Results
1,128 Participants
Work-setting
11
1%
Current Evaluation
3
0%
35
3%
Elementary
373
34%
High
237
21%
None
Post Secondary
Other
Location
101
9%
232
Southeast
373
33%
Support Staff
651
56%
194
17%
District
159
14%
Counselor
Specific
Teacher
160
14%
Middle
487
44%
117
10%
300
27%
Seventy four percent want to be evaluated
based on the job description of a school
counselor within a comprehensive school
counseling program.
Southwest
Unsure
57
Middle
No
Metro
86
8%
Yes
835
Northeast
Northwest
106
9%
0
200
400
600
800
1000
Specialized
Interventions
Individual
Support
Small Group & Closing the Gap
Curriculum (Classroom Lessons/Advisement)
Gail M. Smith (2009)
A Comprehensive School Counseling Program
The American School Counselor
Association National Model
Evaluates
the program
based on
outcomes
and makes
adjustments
Involves
others and
measures
the impact
of the
school
counseling
program
Addresses
the
students’
needs via
direct and
indirect
services
Determines
the
academic,
career, and
personal/so
-cial needs
of the
students in
your school
Performance Standard 1:
Professional Knowledge
(Foundation System)
The professional school counselor demonstrates an
understanding of a comprehensive school
counseling program by providing relevant learning
experiences in the three domains: Academic
achievement, career development and
personal/social growth.
Exemplary (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
continually demonstrates an
extensive understanding of a
comprehensive school
counseling program and serves
as a professional leader by
sharing and contributing to the
further development of the
counseling profession.
The school counselor
consistently demonstrates an
understanding of a
comprehensive school
counseling program and
provides relevant learning
experiences in the three
domains.
The school counselor
inconsistently demonstrates an
understanding of a
comprehensive school
counseling program OR
intermittently uses the
knowledge in practice.
The school counselor
inadequately demonstrates an
understanding of a
comprehensive school
counseling program OR does
not use the knowledge in
practice.
Georgia Curriculum Crosswalking Tool
Performance Standard 2:
Instructional Planning
(Management/Foundation Systems)
The professional school counselor plans and
develops a goal-driven, comprehensive school
counseling program using curriculum and
standards, resources, and data to address the needs
of all students.
Exemplary (3)
The school counselor uses
data and evidence-based
resources to plan and
develop a comprehensive
school counseling program
and specific program goals
that are aligned with the
school strategic plan to
promote achievement for
all students.
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
consistently plans and
develops a goal-driven,
comprehensive school
counseling program using
curriculum and standards,
resources, and data to
address the needs of all
students.
The school counselor inconsistently
uses curriculum and standards,
resources, data, and/or goals to
plan a comprehensive school
counseling program for all students.
The school counselor does
not plan a goal-driven,
comprehensive school
counseling program OR
plans without adequately
using curriculum and
standards, resources, and/or
data.
Annual Partnership Agreement
School Counseling
Program Goals
1. S pecific,
M easureable,
A ttainable,
R esults-Oriented, &
T ime Bound
2. Reflect school data
3. Align with School
Improvement Plan
Write a SMART Goal
By _____________________,
end date
_____________________ will increase/decrease
identified students
choose one
__________________________________________
achievement, attendance, behavior
by ___________________________ .
measure of change
Be Specific!
School Counseling
Program Goals
• State Specific, Desirable Student Outcomes
• Based on School Data
• Address 3 Domains
• May Address School-wide Data, Policies, &
Practices to Address Closing the Gap Issues
How
1. Burning Question
2. School Data Profile Review
3. Current Strategies Brainstorming
4. School Improvement Plan Review
5. SMART Goal Development
How do I choose one?
• Identify a “Burning Question”
– What courageous conversations have been or need to
be conducted?
– Consider current beliefs & inequalities
– Based on data
• Enrollment patterns
– Which students are taking which classes (remedial/enrichment)?
• Discipline referrals
– Which students are being referred and why?
• Student absences
– Who is absent and why?
How do I choose?
• Examine Data
– School Data Profile
• Identify academic gaps by categories
• Think about categories (which groups & what do you want to know?)
– Compare
• Consider categories within one year
• Compare local performance with system and state performance
• Look at trends across years
• Percentages, Numbers, Names
– What percentage of the population shows up and how
compare it to the total school population?
– Always check the actual numbers and individuals behind
those percentages
How do I choose?
• Identify Current Strategies (Core Curriculum)
– What are you Providing to All Students
– Consider All 3 Domains (academic, career, personal/social)
• Provides Overview
– Provides Reminder of Strategies Used
• Reveals Gaps in Program Delivery
– Which areas have less? Too much?
How do I choose?
• Identify a SIP Goal
– Which School Counseling Program Activities align
with the goal?
• Conversation with Administration
– What is the primary focus for the year?
Program Goals - Examplars
Goal #1– Decrease the total number of absences in the 2012-2013 school
year for identified students in grades 6-8 who missed greater than 15 days in
the 2011-2012 school year or who missed greater than 5 days in the first 9
weeks of the 2012-2013 school year from 164 cumulative days absent to 100
days measured at the end of the school year.
Goal #2 – Decrease the number of discipline referrals in grades 6-8 for
classroom and school disturbance from 87 in the 2011-2012 school year to
50, measured at the end of the 2012-2013 school year.
Goal #3 - Decrease the number of students in grades six through eight who
are failing a class at the end of the first nine weeks from 70 to 20 by the end
of the 4th 9 weeks.
Goal #4 – Decrease the number of identified economically disadvantaged
students in grades six through eight who failed either of the Reading, ELA,
and Math sections of the Spring 2013 CRCT from 28 to 14.
Performance Standard 3:
Instructional Strategies
(Delivery System)
The professional school counselor promotes student learning by
implementing a comprehensive school counseling program by
spending 80% of time in school counseling core curriculum,
individual student planning, responsive services, and indirect
student services and 20% in program planning and school support.
Exemplary (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
continually promotes
student learning by
implementing an
exemplary
comprehensive school
counseling program that
serves as a model for
other counseling
programs and positively
impacts the overall
school strategic plan.
The school counselor consistently
promotes student learning by
implementing a comprehensive
school counseling program by
spending 80% of time in school
counseling core curriculum,
individual student planning,
responsive services, and indirect
student services and 20% in
program planning and school
support.
The school counselor
inconsistently promotes
student learning by
implementing some
components of a
comprehensive school
counseling program.
The school counselor does
not promote student learning
by failing to implement a
comprehensive school
counseling program, which
includes core curriculum,
individual student planning,
responsive services, and
indirect student services.
Core Curriculum
• Standards based
– Academic Achievement
– Career Exploration
– Personal/Social Growth
•
•
•
•
Developmentally appropriate for Pre K-12
Tied to the school improvement plan
Can be cross-walked with teacher standards
Delivered through
– Classroom Lessons
– Group Activities
Individual Planning
Ongoing systemic activities to assist students
individually in establishing personal goals and
developing future plans
Responsive Services
Activities to meet students’ immediate needs:
– Individual Counseling
– Small Group Counseling
– Crisis Intervention
– Agency Referrals
– Consultation
– Peer Facilitation
Indirect Student Services
• Referrals
• Consultation
• Collaboration
Program Planning and School Support
Management activities that establish,
maintain, and enhance the total school
counseling program such as:
• Program Management
• Professional Development
• Data Analysis
• Fair Share Responsibilities
Addressing student needs within
comprehensive programs
Recommended
Direct Services to
School Counseling Core
Students (Face to Face Curriculum
Interactions with
Students)
Provides developmental
curriculum content in a
systematic way to all students
Individual Student Planning Assists students in the
development of educational,
career and personal plans
Indirect Services for
Students
(Communications on
behalf of students)
Responsive Services
Addresses the immediate
concerns of students
Referrals, Consultation and
Collaboration
Interacts with others to provide
support for student
achievement
Program Planning and Foundation, management
and accountability of the
School Support
program and school
support
Includes planning and
evaluating the school
counseling program and school
support activities
80%
or
more
20%
or less
Use of time
tools
Performance Standard 4:
Individualized Instruction
(Delivery System)
The professional school counselor coordinates
individual student planning and responsive services
designed to meet student needs on an individual
and/or small group basis.
Exemplary (3)
The school counselor
continually facilitates
innovative individual and
small group interventions
that engage students in
critical and creative thinking
and challenging activities
tailored to address individual
student needs.
Proficient (2)
The school counselor
consistently coordinates
individual student planning
and responsive services
designed to meet student
needs on an individual and/or
small group basis.
Needs Development (1)
The school counselor
inconsistently coordinates
individual student planning
and responsive services
designed to meet student
needs on an individual and/or
small group basis.
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor does not
coordinate individual student
planning and responsive
services designed to meet
student needs on an individual
and/or small group basis.
PERSONAL SOCIAL
Performance Standard 5:
Data Collection
(Accountability/Management Systems)
The professional school counselor uses a variety of
strategies and instruments to collect student data in
order to guide appropriate counseling interventions
and programs.
Exemplary (3)
The school counselor
continually demonstrates
expertise and provides
leadership in the
development and the
utilization of a variety of
strategies and
instruments that
measure process,
perception and outcome
data to drive program
planning.
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
systematically and consistently
uses a variety of strategies and
instruments to collect student
data in order to guide
appropriate counseling
interventions and programs.
The school counselor
inconsistently uses a variety
of strategies and instruments
OR the instruments are not
always appropriate to collect
the necessary student data to
guide counseling
interventions or programs.
The school counselor does not
use strategies and instruments
OR the instruments are not
appropriate to collect the
necessary student data to
guide counseling interventions
or programs.
Performance Standard 6:
Data Evaluation
(Accountability/Management Systems)
The professional school counselor evaluates student
data and the effectiveness of the counseling core
curriculum, small groups, and closing-the-gap data in
order to assess and plan the school counseling program
and shares program results with stakeholders.
Exemplary (3)
The school counselor
continually demonstrates
expertise in using relevant
data to evaluate the program
and leads others in the
effective use of data to
inform program decisions
that bring about systemic
change.
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
systematically and
consistently uses relevant
data to evaluate and develop
the school counseling
program, and shares program
results with stakeholders.
The school counselor
inconsistently uses relevant
data to evaluate and/or
develop the school counseling
program, and/or inconsistently
shares program results with
stakeholders.
The school counselor does
not use data to evaluate and
develop the school
counseling program OR does
not share program results
with stakeholders.
School Counseling Program
Data Collection
PROCESS
(Numbers
Impacted)
PERCEPTION
(Attitude, Skills, &
Knowledge)
OUTCOME
(Achievement,
Attendance, or
Behavior)
Process Data
What you did for whom?
• Evidence that event occurred
• How activity was conducted
• Did the program follow the prescribed
practice?
DOES NOT SAY HOW
KIDS ARE DIFFERENT
Process Data
What you did for whom?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Evidence that event occurred
How many?
Who?
When?
How activity was conducted?
Did the program follow the prescribed
practice?
Process Data
What you did for whom?
• Eight fourth-grade students participated in
a study skills group that met six times for
45 minutes
• 450 ninth-graders completed an individual
learning plan
• 38 parents attended the middle school
orientation meeting
Example of Process Data
What you did for whom?
Three groups of ten (30 total) seventh-grade students
met once a week (rotating class periods) for eight
weeks in the school counseling group room to learn
motivational skills utilizing the “Why Try” curriculum.
Hatch, T. (2014)
Perception Data
What does a student know, believe or can do?
• A - Changes in attitudes and beliefs
• S - Attainment of competencies (skills)
• K - Gains in knowledge
I believe…
I can…
I learned…
Perception Data
What do people think they know, believe or can do?
• Attainment of competencies
• Changes in attitudes and beliefs
• Perceived gains in knowledge
Perception Data
From Different Sources
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pre/Post Assessments
Surveys
Continuums or Scaling Techniques
Take a Stand Activities
Observations
Journaling
The Core Curriculum Collects Data …
Outcome
• What was the impact?
– On Achievement
– On Behavior
– On Attendance
• Available or Created Data?
• Provide Evidence
Perception Data
What do people think they know, believe or can do?
• 100% of sixth-graders can identify three career interests
• 89% of students demonstrate knowledge of promotion/
retention criteria
• 92% can identify early warning signs of violence
• 93 % of fourth-graders believe fighting is not an
appropriate method of solving problems
• 69 % of all students report feeling safe at school
• 90 % of the parents report benefiting from a presentation
on college entrance requirements
Examples of Perception Data
What do students think they know, believe or can do?
• Before receiving a classroom lesson, 30% of students
believed taking college prep courses was important. This
increased to 80% after the lesson.
• Every seventh-grade student completed an interest
inventory.
• Before a series of group counseling sessions, 56% of fifthgrade males referred for anger management support knew
three ways to divert anger in a healthy way; after the
sessions, this increased to 92%
Hatch, T. (2014)
Outcome Data
(Formerly Known as Results Data)
- ULTIMATE GOAL
So what?
• Hard data
• Application data
• Evidenced by student’s ability to utilize the
knowledge, attitudes and skills
– Attendance
– Behavior
– Academic achievement
Examples of Outcome Data
“The Ultimate Goal”
Achievement
Attendance
Behavioral
85% of students who earned below a 2.0
overall GPA in the first trimester improved by
earning a 2.0 GPA or better by the third
trimester.
Attendance of Latino students in seventh and
eighth grades has improved by 12% this year.
The number of referrals for incidences of
bullying in fourth and fifth grades has
decreased 51% from the first semester to the
second.
Hatch, T. (2014)
Results Reports – Closing the Gap,
Core Curriculum & Small Group
Georgia Closing the Gap Results Report
School:
Program Goal:
Target Group and data used to identify students:
Counselor(s)
ASCA Domain,
Standard and
Student
Competency
Type of
Activities
Delivered and
in What
Manner
Resources
Utilized
Year:
Number of
Students
Involved
Perception
Data
(attitudes,
skills and
knowledge
impacted)
Outcome
Data
(achievement,
attendance, or
behavior
impacted)
Implications:
Based upon the data
What have you
What are your
concluded from
future plans?
the intervention?
Performance Standard 7:
Positive Learning Environment
(Foundation System)
The professional school counselor promotes a safe,
positive learning environment which is inclusive of ALL
students (including but not limited to race, color, religion,
gender, national origin or disability) and advocates for
student needs in order to reach their educational goals.
Exemplary (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
continually promotes a
positive learning
environment for ALL students
by working collaboratively
with all stakeholders to
remove educational barriers
for students and creating
systemic change at the local,
district or state level.
The school counselor
consistently promotes a
safe, positive learning
environment which is
inclusive of ALL students
and advocates for student
needs.
The school counselor inconsistently
promotes a safe, positive learning
environment that is inclusive of ALL
students and inconsistently
advocates on behalf of student
needs.
The school counselor
inadequately promotes a
safe, positive learning
environment that is
inclusive of ALL students OR
does not advocate on behalf
of student needs.
Beliefs - Examplar
School counselors believe:
1.
All students have the ability to achieve high levels of learning and academic success to their
individual potential.
2.
The needs of all students can be met through the implementation of our comprehensive
school counseling program.
3.
High levels of learning and academic success of all students will be achieved if equal access
to all programs is advocated by the leadership of school counselors as they collaborate with
all stakeholders.
4.
All students benefit through participation in a comprehensive school counseling program
that is planned, managed, delivered, and evaluated by trained and licensed professional
school counselors.
5.
The comprehensive school counseling program must be developed and delivered based on
current school data and needs assessments that have been translated in to attainable
goals.
6.
The ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors are the basis and guide in which all
school counselors will make decisions to maintain the highest standard of integrity,
leadership, and professionalism.
Vision - Examplar
The vision of the xxxx Middle School counseling program is for
all students to achieve high levels of learning and academic
success. They will graduate college and career ready and able to
meet the challenges of a global workforce as self-sufficient,
socially competent, critical thinking, and problem solving
individuals. They will reach their full potential as productive and
engaged citizens full of compassion, perseverance, and resolve
ready to make a positive difference in their community.
Mission - Examplar
The mission of the School counseling program is to promote high standards and high
expectations that challenge all students across academic, personal, social and career
domains that will inspire them to learn and excel. A comprehensive and
developmental school counseling program that is aligned with the curriculum will be
implemented by professional school counselors so that all students can achieve their
full potential in a positive, safe, orderly, respectful and culturally sensitive
environment. In collaboration with administration, teachers, parents, and the
community, school counselors will advocate for equal access to all programs and
resources for all students so that their academic, personal, social, and career needs
will be met. Our mission is to foster responsible student behavior and a passion for
lifelong learning.
Mission, Vision & Belief Statement
Closing the Achievement Gap
Performance Standard 8:
College and Career Readiness
Environment
(Delivery System)
The professional school counselor creates a studentcentered environment which promotes postsecondary planning and the development of soft
skills.
Exemplary (3)
The school counselor
continually creates an
innovative environment
where students set realistic
individual post-secondary
goals and develop the skills
necessary to reach those
goals.
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
consistently creates a
student-centered
environment which
promotes post-secondary
planning and the
development of soft skills.
The school counselor
inconsistently provides a
student-centered
environment which promotes
post-secondary planning and
the development of soft skills.
The school counselor does
not provide a studentcentered environment which
promotes post-secondary
planning or the development
of soft skills.
Post Secondary Planning
NOSCA’s 8 components of
College and career Readiness
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
College Aspirations
Academic Planning for College and Career Readiness
Enrichment and Extracurricular Engagement
Connect College and Career Exploration and Selection
Processes
College and Career Assessments
College Affordability Planning
College and Career Admission Processes
Transition from High School Graduation to College
Enrollment
4 year HS Career Development Plan
9th Grade
Freshmen Orientation
Counselors
Fall
College Jamboree
Counselors
Sept
“High School
Success” Series
Family Small group
sessions
Career Cruising
interest inventory
Schedule/Career
advisory lessons
Counselors
Counselors
Fall semester (7-8
sessions)
Oct
Counselors
Fall
Teacher Advisors
Aug, Feb, March,
May
College Jamboree
PSAT
Family Small group session
PSAT score lesson
Career Cruising Activities
exploration
Type Focus Personality testing
College Admission Trip
Schedule/Career advisory lessons
Spring
Counselors/Teachers
Teacher Advisors
Spring
Aug, Feb,
March, May
Counselors
August
Senior one-on-one family
counseling
Counselors
Aug-Sept
College Jamboree
Counselors
September
College Fair Trip
Counselors
September
College Application Lockin
Teacher Advisors/
Counselors
November
Financial Aid Workshop
Counselors
February
Transitioning beyond High
School
Counselors
April
Spring
Aug, Feb,
March, May
Schedule/Career advisory
lessons
Teacher Advisors
Aug, Feb, March, May
Counselors
September
PSAT
Teacher
Advisors
Counselors
October
Teacher
Advisors
Counselors
January
Junior one-on-one family counseling Counselors
Jan-Feb
ACT/SAT Prep Workshop
Counselors
Jan-Feb
Career Cruising-Job/College Search
Counselors
Spring
Type Focus-Personality and career
Counselors
Schedule/Career advisory lessons
Teacher
Advisors
College Fair Trip
Counselors
Senior Information Night
College Jamboree
PSAT score lesson
September
Oct
November
January
Spring
12th Grade
11th Grade
Junior Information Night
10th Grade
Counselors
Teacher Advisors
Counselors
Teacher Advisors
Counselors
January
February
And at the Elementary Level
• Georgia’s Career Clusters
– Developing Effective Lessons
– Deciding Who Delivers them
•
•
•
•
Exploring Interests & Skills
Linking Interests to Careers
Career Exploration
Goal Setting
Performance Standard 9:
Professionalism
(Foundation System)
The professional school counselor exhibits a commitment
to professional ethics and the mission, vision and beliefs of
the school counseling program and participates in
professional growth opportunities.
Exemplary (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
promotes and facilitates a
culture of professionalism
and ethical behavior within
the counseling and
education professions,
contributes to the
professional development of
others AND serves as a
model within the school
counseling profession.
The school counselor
consistently exhibits a
commitment to professional
ethics and the mission, vision
and beliefs of the school
counseling program and
regularly participates in
professional growth
opportunities.
The school counselor
inconsistently supports the
mission, vision and beliefs of the
school counseling program OR
seldom participates in
professional growth
opportunities.
The school counselor shows
a disregard for professional
ethics OR mission, vision and
beliefs of the school
counseling program OR
rarely takes advantage of
professional growth
opportunities.
A. RESPONSIBILITIES TO STUDENTS
B. RESPONSIBILITIES TO PARENTS/GUARDIANS
C. RESPONSIBILITIES TO COLLEAGUES & PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATES
D. RESPONSIBILITIES TO SCHOOL, COMMUNITIES AND FAMILIES
E. RESPONSIBILITIES TO SELF
F. RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE PROFESSION
G. MAINTENANCE OF STANDARDS
Professional Development
Performance Standard 10:
Communication
(Delivery/Management Systems)
The professional school counselor communicates
effectively with students, parents/guardians, district and
school personnel, and other stakeholders in a way that
enhances student learning and improves the
comprehensive school counseling program.
Exemplary (3)
Proficient (2)
Needs Development (1)
Ineffective (0)
The school counselor
continually uses a variety of
communication techniques
to proactively inform,
network, and collaborate
with stakeholders to
enhance student learning
and improve the
comprehensive school
counseling program.
The school counselor
communicates effectively and
consistently with students,
parents/guardians, district
and school personnel, and
other stakeholders in a way
that enhances student
learning and improves the
comprehensive school
counseling program.
The school counselor
inconsistently communicates
with students, parents/guardians,
district and school personnel, and
other stakeholders OR
communicates in ways that only
partially enhance student
learning or partially improve the
comprehensive school counseling
program.
The school counselor
inadequately communicates
with students,
parents/guardians, district
and school personnel, or
other stakeholders by poorly
acknowledging concerns,
responding to inquiries, or
encouraging involvement.
Effective Communication
Engaging Key Stakeholders
Advisory Council
School Leadership Team
Overall Rating for CKES
Indicate the overall rating based on the total score above.
Exemplary: Total Score of 27 – 30 with NO Needs Development
or Ineffective Ratings
(A score of 27-30 with a Needs Development or Ineffective
results in an overall rating of Proficient.)
Proficient: Total Score of 17 – 26 with NO Ineffective Ratings
(A score of 17-26 with an Ineffective results in an overall rating
of Needs Development.)
Needs Development: Total Score of 8 - 16
Ineffective: Total Score of 0-7
Questions
CKES Contact Information:
[email protected]

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