MIPS Assembly Tutorial

Report
COM181
Computer Hardware
Lecture 5:MIPS Assembly Tutorial
"Adapted from Computer Organization and Design, 4th Edition, Patterson & Hennessy,
2008.” This material may not be copied or distributed for commercial purposes without
express written permission of the copyright holders.
Also drawn from the work of Mary Jane Irwin (
www.cse.psu.edu/~mji )
Ian McCrum
Room 5B18, Tel: 90 366364 voice mail on 6th ring
Email: [email protected] Web site: http://www.eej.ulst.ac.uk
08/08/12
www.eej.ulster.ac.uk/~ian/modules/COM181/files
Types of Instructions
• There are 3 main types of assembly
instructions
– Arithmetic - add, sub, mul, shifts, and, or,
etc.
– Load/store
– Conditional - branches
Arithmetic Instructions
add a, b, c
add a, a, d
add a, a, e
a = b+c
a = d+a = d+b+c
a = e+a = e+d+b+c
Example: Translate the following instructions to
assembly code
a = b+c
d = a-e
Solution:
add a, b, c
sub d, a, e
Arithmetic Instructions
Example: Translate the following instructions to
assembly code. Remember with RISC, only 1
operation per instruction! HINT - you may need
temporary variables
f = (g+h) - (i+j)
Solution:
add t0, g, h
add t1, i, j
sub f, t0, t1
Operands
• In assembly code, you can’t use
variables such as a, b, c, etc
• In RISC instruction sets, operands must
be registers such as r1, r2, r3, etc
– r0 is typically reserved to hold the
immediate value of 0
– There is a limited number of registers
• MIPS has 32
Arithmetic Instructions Using
Registers
Example: Translate the following instructions to
assembly code. Assume that g, h, i, and j are
already stored in r1, r2, r3, and r4. Store f in r5
f = (g+h) - (i+j)
Solution:
add r6, r1, r2
add r7, r3, r4
sub r5, r6, r7
What about more data??
• With only a limited number of registers, not all
data can be stored in registers at the same
time.
– Registers only store data that is currently being
operated on
• Variables are stored in memory and then
loaded into registers when needed using data
transfer instructions
– Load word (lw) and store word (sw)
Load and store word
• Load word format
– lw destination register, memory location
• Store word format
– sw source register, memory location
• Memory location format
– Offset(base address)
• Base address = starting location of data in memory
• Offset = how far away is location to access from base
address
– Values are added together
LW Example
Example: Assume that A is an array of 100 words.
Assume the base address is stored in r3, g is in r1
and h is in r2
g = h + A[8]
Solution:
Offset
lw r4, 8(r3)
add r1, r2, r4
Base Address
This is
simplified,
more details
later…
Data in Memory
• All variables/data are stored in memory
– You will need to do this in your assembler
– Your ISS will need a data structure to hold
main memory
• Array is fine
Addressing Data
• Architecture usually addresses data in
bytes (byte addressable)
– 32-bit architecture = 4 bytes = 1 word
• lw/sw load/store 1 word or 4 bytes
– Thus, data/inst addresses are multiples of 4
• Data is word aligned to be more efficient
Data in Memory
.
.
.
.
.
.
12
8
4
0
100
10
101
1
Address
Data
LW/SW Example
Example: Assume that A is an array of 100 words.
Assume the base address is stored in r3 and h is
stored in r2. You may directly calculate the offset.
Remember, each data piece is 4 bytes when
calculating the offset
A[12] = h+A[8]
Solution:
lw r1, 32(r3)
add r4, r2, r1
sw r4, 48(r3)
LW/SW Example
Example: Assume that A is an array of 100 words.
Assume the base address is stored in r3 and g, h,
and i are in r1, r2, and r4 respectively. Calculate the
offset using assembly instructions but don’t use
multiplication yet (mult instruction is different)
g = h + A[i]
Solution:
add r5, r4, r4
add r5, r5, r5
add r5, r5, r3
lw r6, 0(r5)
add r1, r6, r2
# Temp reg r5=2*i
# Temp reg r5=4*i
# t1 = addr of A[i] (4*i+r3)
# Temp reg r0=a[i]
# g=h+a[i]
Translating MIPS Assm
Language to Machine Language
• Translate human readable assembly
code to machine readable code (binary)
– I will show examples in decimal for
readability
– This is what you assembler will do but it
will output in binary.
MIPS -> Machine Language
Example: Show the real MIPS language version of
the following instruction in both decimal and binary
add r0, r1, r2
Solution:
decimal
0
0
1
2
0
32
00010
00000
100000
5 bits
6 bits
binary
000000
00000
00001
6 bits
5 bits
5 bits
5 bits
Each segment is referred to as a field. Details to
come….
MIPS Fields
• MIPS fields are giving names to make
them easier to discuss
op
rs
rt
6 bits
5 bits
5 bits
rd
5 bits
shamt
funct
5 bits
6 bits
• op: Basic operation of the instruction, typically called the opcode
• rs: The first register source operand
• rt: The second register source operand
• rd: The register destination operand, it gets the result of the operation
• shamt: Shift amount (0 if not shift instruction)
• funct: Function. This field selects the specific variant of the operation in the
op field, and is sometimes called the function code
MIPS Fields
• Problem occurs with an instruction needs a
longer field than that showed on the previous
slide
– I.e. LW must specify 2 registers and a constant.
Limited to 5-bit constant if use previous format.
• Solution: There are different formats for
different types of instructions
– Previous slide is R-type (R-format):
• R=register
MIPS Fields
op
rs
rt
6 bits
5 bits
5 bits
address
16 bits
• I-type (I-format)
– I=immediate
– Now LW can specify an address up to 16bits
• Opcode determines the format
MIPS Instruction Encoding
MIPS Asm -> Machine
Language
Example: Assume r1 is the base of A and r2
corresponds to h, the C statement:
A[300] = h + A[300]
is compiled to:
lw r0, 1200(r1)
add r0, r2, r0
sw r0, 1200(r1)
What is the MIPS machine code for these three
instructions? (Use figure 3.5)
MIPS Asm -> Machine
lw r0, 1200(r1)
add r0, r2, r0
Language
sw r0, 1200(r1)
Solution:
decimal
op
rs
rt
35
0
1
0
0
2
43
0
1
rd
Address
/shamt
funct
1200
0
0
32
1200
binary
100011
00000
00001
000000
00000
00010
101011
00000
00001
0000 0100 1011 0000
00000
00000
0000 0100 1011 0000
32
Decision Instructions
• Branch/jump instructions
– Conditional branches
• beq register1, register2, Label
• bne register1, register2, Label
– Unconditional branches
• j Label
Decision Instructions
Example: Assume f->r0, g->r1, h->r2, i->r3, j->r4
L1:
if ( i==j ) goto L1
f = g+h
f = f-i
Solution:
L1:
beq r3, r4, L1
add r0, r1, r2
sub r0, r0, r3
Labels will need to
be translated to
instruction address
in your assembler
Decision Instructions
Example: Assume f->r0, g->r1, h->r2, i->r3, j->r4
L1:
if ( i==j )
f = g+h
else
f = g-h
L2:
Solution:
L1:
L2:
bne r3, r4, L1
add r0, r1, r2
j L2
sub r0, r1, r2
Decision Instructions
Example: A is 100 elements with the base address
in r5. g->r1, h->r2, i->r3, j->r4
Loop: g = g+A[i]
i = i+j
if ( i!=h ) goto Loop
Solution:
Loop:
add r6, r3, r3
add r6, r6, r6
add r6, r6, r5
lw r7, 0(r6)
add r1, r1, r7
add r3, r3, r4
bne r3, r2, Loop
While Loop
• Goto statements are bad, just used
them as an example.
• You will want to use while loops
– Or for loops but I am just showing you
while loops
While Loop
Example: Base address of save is in r6. i->r3, j->r4,
k->r5
while ( save[i] == k )
i = i+j
Solution:
Loop:
Exit:
add r1, r3, r4
add r1, r1, r1
add r1, r1, r6
lw r0, 0(r1)
bne r0, r5, Exit
add r3, r3, r4
j Loop
Other Styles of MIPS
Addressing
• Constant or immediate operands
– Programs often use constant values
– I.e. incrementing to the next data element while
scanning an array
• addi instruction - adds an immediate
value to a register
Immediate Operands
Example: What is the machine code for the
following? (Remember the I-format instruction)
addi r4, r4, 4
Solution:
decimal
op
8
rs
4
rt
4
Immediate
4
binary
001000
00100
00100
0000 0000 0000 0100
Addressing in Branches and
Jumps
• Last instruction format - J-type (Jformat)
opcode
Target address
• Branches do not use J-type.
– Must specify 2 registers to compare
– Use I-type

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