FAMOUS PEOPLE OF GDANSK

Report
FAMOUS PEOPLE OF
GDANSK
REALIZED BY:
MICHAŁ KAŁDOŃSKI AND
MATEUSZ WALCZAK
FROM CLASS 2AL
Johannes Hevelius
Johannes Hevelius lived around 1611-1687 – born in Gdansk
he was a renowned astronomer and an author of Selenographia.
In 1640 he built an observatory in Gdansk for which he himself
invented many instruments. Hevelius observed the placement
of many planets, comets and stars including the surface of the
Moon and the moons of Saturn and Jupiter. At the time, he
invented what was considered to be the largest telescope on
Earth with the length of 50 meters. He left behind many
instructive works.
Gunter Grass
Gunter Grass – a German poet born in 1927 in Gdansk
(ancestors from his mother’s side were of Kashubian origin).
Well known for his novel “The Tin Drum” released in Poland in
1979 in which he criticizes his nation’s socialism. His rich
creativity was largely based on a wide variety of topics ranging
from political to ecological issues. In “The Call of The Toad”
Grass condemns the form of reconciliation between Poland and
Germany. In 1999 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Lech Walesa
Lech Walesa (born in 1943). An alumnus of a vocation school
in Lipno. He was a member of shipyard strike committee
during so called “December Events” in 1970. During 19771980 he was co-founder of many non-communist trade unions
and took part in many actions on the sea coast for which he was
kept under surveillance. Between 1980 and 1990 he presided
as the leader of Solidarity. During martial law he was
frequently detained. He represented the Solidarity Trade Union
during many “round table” discussions. From 1990-1995 he
was the president of the Republic of Poland. He received
countless awards including the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1998 he
became the head of the Christian Democracy of the Third
Commonwealth of the Republic of Poland.
Dariusz Michalczewski
Darius Michalczewski (born in 1969). A citizen of Gdansk
who after becoming the Polish Champion moved to Germany,
where in 1991 began his career as a professional boxer. He was
undefeated until October 2003 when he lost to the Mexican
Julio Cesar Gonzales. Earlier Tiger was World Champion in
the welter-weight division of all federations. Michalczewski
opened pubs in Warsaw, Szczecin and Gdansk (where he also
owns a fitness club). He is a strong supporter of many social
initiatives and he’s funded scholarships for many talented
boxers. He was ranked 149th among the richest Poles in 2003
with a net worth close to 7.5 million euros. In early June 2005
he announced his retirement from the ring, but expressed
interest in staying involved in boxing by mentoring and
managing young athletes.
Henryk Jankowski
Henry Jankowski (born December 18, 1936), a Polish catholic
priest, served as rector at the St. Brigid Parish in Gdansk,
closely tied to the Solidarity movement and the anti-communist
opposition. On March 17, 1970 he took an oath in Gdansk and
formally became the rector of the St. Brigid Parish in Gdansk.
On August 17, 1980 in the Gdansk Shipyard he celebrated mass
with hundreds of workers. Shortly afterwards he was called to
become the official chief priest of Solidarity. During martial
law the St. Brigid Church and presbytery became the
headquarters of the opposition movement. He was a key figure
in organizing material support for members of the movement
and their families. The church became a site of many antigovernment rallies. From 1990 he served as the Honorary
Prelate of John Paul II.

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