Quiz A - Dive

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Quiz 1-A
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Quiz 1 – A Question

1
Something underwater that does not float
and does not sink is:
A. positively buoyant.
B. negatively buoyant.
C. neutrally buoyant.
D. partially buoyant.
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
2
If an object is neutrally buoyant in salt
water. What will probably happen to the
object if you put it into fresh water?
A. The object will sink.
B. The object will float.
C. The object will not sink or float.
D. I cannot tell from the question.
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Quiz 1 – A Question

3
Imagine a diver is 33 metres/99 feet
underwater. The water pressure at this
depth would be ______times more than
the pressure at the surface.
A. two
B. three
C. four
D. five
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Quiz 1-A Question 3
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
4
Imagine you hold a glass full of air upside down
and you take it to the bottom of the swimming pool
without tipping it. The density (thickness) of
the air inside the glass
will be ____ at
the surface.
A. less than
B. greater than
C. the same as
D. less than or greater than
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Quiz 1-A Question 4
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Quiz 1 – A Question

5
What should you do if you cannot equalize (clear)
your ears or sinuses while you are descending
(going down)?
A. Continue descending (going down), but go
slower.
B. Stop descending (going down) and try again to
equalize (clear) by blowing harder.
C. Stop and ascend (go up) a few metres/feet and
try to equalize (clear) again.
D. Surface and wait one minute before descending (going
down) again.
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Quiz 1-A Question 5
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Quiz 1 – A Question

6
What should you do to prevent mask
squeeze (a sucking or pulling feeling on
your face and eyes)?
A. Make an ah-h-h-h
sound.
B. Pinch your nose and
blow against it.
C. Wiggle your jaw from
side to side.
D. Blow into your mask through your nose.
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Quiz 1-A Question 6
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Quiz 1 – A Question

7
Imagine you put air into a balloon underwater at
10 metres/33 feet and then you take it to the
surface. The air in the balloon will:
A. stay the same size as it was at 10 metres/33 feet.
B. expand to twice the size
as it was at 10 metres/33 feet.
C. expand to four times the size
as it was at 10 metres/33 feet.
D. expand to eight times the size
as it was at 10 metres/33 feet.
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Quiz 1-A Question 7
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Quiz 1 – A Question

8
What can happen to you if you hold your
breath while ascending (going up) on a
scuba dive?
A. Your lungs can over expand which could
cause serious injury.
B. Your scuba equipment may not work properly.
C. You might hurt your ears or sinuses.
D. Nothing would happen to you.
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Quiz 1-A Question 8
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Quiz 1 – A Question

9
What is the most important feature of a
scuba regulator?
A. How easy it is to take care of it.
B. How easy it is to breathe from it.
C. How much it costs.
D. Whether the second stage has an adjustment
knob or not.
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Quiz 1-A Question 9
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Quiz 1 – A Question

10
Why is it important to practice the buddy
system whenever you go diving?
A. Diving is easier with a buddy.
B. Diving is safer with a buddy.
C. Diving is more fun with a buddy.
D. All of the above.
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Quiz 2 – A
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Quiz 2 – A Question

1
When you look at things underwater they
often seem ____ than when you look at
them on the surface.
A. farther away and smaller
B. nearer and larger
C. nearer and smaller
D. farther away and larger
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
2
Sound travels faster in water and it is
difficult to tell:
A. where the sound is coming from.
B. how loud the sound is.
C. what caused the sound.
D. whether the sound is normal.
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Quiz 2 – A Question

3
If you get cold while diving and you cannot
stop shivering (shaking), what should you
do?
A. Try to warm up by swimming harder.
B. Do not move your arms and legs to stay
warm.
C. Stop diving right away, get out of the
water, and change into something
warm.
D. Try to save your body heat by moving slowly.
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Quiz 2-A Question 3
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
4
You want to move slowly and gradually
underwater. Why?
A. It is hard for you to swim fast against water.
B. So you use less air.
C. So you do not get tired.
D. All of the above.
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Quiz 2-A Question 4
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Quiz 2 – A Question

5
When breathing underwater while scuba
diving, you should:
A. use airway control.
B. breathe continuously (breathe always, never
hold your breath).
C. breathe slowly and deeply.
D. All of the above.
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Quiz 2 – A Question

6
Proper fitting wet suits keep you
warm by:
A. reducing the amount of water moving in
and out of your suit.
B. increasing the amount of water moving in and
out of your suit.
C. increasing blood flow to the skin.
D. providing an insulating layer of air.
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Quiz 2-A Question 6
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Quiz 2 – A Question

7
The most important feature of a weight
system is:
A. you can use it without your hands.
B. you can remove the weight easily with
one hand in an emergency.
C. a design that keeps the weight from moving
around during the dive.
D. padding to protect you from accidental injury.
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Quiz 2-A Question 7
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Quiz 2 – A Question

8
The best place for you to carry an alternate
air source is:
A. loose by your side so
you can find it fast.
B. in your pocket.
C. clipped to your tank.
D. attached to the
triangle area between
your chin and your chest.
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Quiz 2-A Question 8
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Quiz 2 – A Question

9
Waving your arms at
the surface indicates
that:
A. you are trying
to get your buddy to
look at you.
B. you want the dive
boat to pick you up.
C. you are okay!
D. you need help!
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Quiz 2-A Question 9
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Quiz 2 – A Question

10
How can you maintain the buddy system on a
scuba dive?
A. Follow another buddy team with more
experience.
B. Use an underwater compass.
C. Decide who will lead the dive, which side
of the leader you will be on, and where you
are going to go.
D. Always stay on the left
of the dive boat.
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Quiz 3 – A
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Question 6
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Question 4
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Quiz 3 – A Question

1
You should take a local area orientation dive
whenever:
A. you dive anywhere, even
if you dived there before.
B. you dive some
place new.
C. you dive without
advanced training.
D. you are not diving
with an instructor.
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Quiz 3 – A Question

2
How can you avoid vertigo (dizziness and
confusion) on a dive?
A. Close your eyes.
B. Turn slowly while you look up.
C. Ascend (go up) and descend (go down)
along the bottom or a reference line.
D. All of the above.
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Quiz 3 – A Question

3
Underwater visibility (how far you can see
horizontally) can be affected by:
A. water movement.
B. weather.
C. suspended particles
(floating silt) in the water.
D. All of the above.
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Quiz 3-A Question 3
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Quiz 3 – A Question

4
Imagine there is a mild current on your
dive. You should begin your dive:
A. swimming with the current pushing
you along.
B. swimming against or into the current.
C. swimming across the current pushing you
sideways.
D. None of the above.
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Quiz 3-A Question 4
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Quiz 3 – A Question

5
Most diver injuries caused by aquatic animals
happen because:
A. the animal thinks you are food.
B. the animal is aggressive (like a bully).
C. the animal is protecting
itself from you.
D. you did not feed the animal.
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Quiz 3 – A Question

6
You can prevent most surface emergencies
(problems) by:
A. diving only from boats.
B. diving with a skilled buddy in a familiar place.
C. using the best equipment made.
D. reducing your physical effort and
making yourself float.
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Quiz 3-A Question 6
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Quiz 3 – A Question

7
What is the first thing you should do with
an injured diver at the surface?
A. Make the diver float and check to see if
the diver is breathing.
B. Get the diver out of the water.
C. Find out what happened.
D. Give the diver emergency oxygen.
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Quiz 3-A Question 7
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Quiz 3 – A Question

8
Imagine you accidentally get tangled in
something. What should you do first?
A. Stop, think and slowly untangle
yourself.
B. Try to turn around and see
where you are tangled.
C. Ask your buddy to help
untangle you.
D. Take off your scuba unit.
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Quiz 3-A Question 8
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Quiz 3 – A Question

9
Imagine you are very low on air and about
to run out. What would you do?
5th
1st
6th
2nd
4th
3rd
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- buoyant
emergency ascent (dropping your weight
system)
- normal ascent (going up normally)
- in the future you would look at your gauges more
often so this would not happen
- alternate air source ascent (using your buddy’s
alternate air source)
- buddy breathing ascent (sharing a single source
of air with your buddy)
- controlled emergency swimming ascent (CESA swimming up to the surface saying ah-h-h-h)
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Quiz 3-A Question 9
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Quiz 3 – A Question

10
After getting an unresponsive (unconscious
or dazed) diver out of the water, you should
keep checking for ____.
A. uncontrollable shaking.
B. panic (stress).
C. breathing and pulse.
D. water in the lungs.
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Quiz 4 – A
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Question 6
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Question 7
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Question 10
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Quiz 4 – A Question

1
Besides being required for diver training
your log book is something that:
A. gives you a record of your dive
experience.
B. is required by law in most countries.
C. has no purpose except for your personal
interest.
D. is required to purchase diving equipment.
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Quiz 4 – A Question

2
Diving with enriched air requires special
training and procedures (rules). Using
enriched air without proper training and
procedures can cause:
A. your dive computer to shut down.
B. no real harm.
C. bad air.
D. oxygen toxicity (poisoning).
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Quiz 4 – A Question

3
Imagine you are an Advanced Open Water
Diver. You begin to act foolishly at a depth
of 30 metres/100 feet. What might you be
experiencing?
A. Decompression illness.
B. Nitrogen narcosis.
C. Decompression sickness.
D. Oxygen toxicity
(poisoning).
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Quiz 4 – A Question

4
Decompression sickness (DCS) is a
condition that can be life threatening. What
forms in the bloodstream and tissues that
can cause this condition?
A. Nitrogen bubbles.
B. Poisons.
C. Body waste.
D. None of the above.
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Quiz 4-A Question 4
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Quiz 4 – A Question

5
Pain in one area, weakness, tingling,
numbness and not being able to move your
arms or legs are common signs and
symptoms of:
A. not thinking clearly.
B. oxygen poisoning.
C. contaminated air (bad air).
D. DCS - nitrogen bubbles blocking blood
circulation/flow in your body after
a dive.
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Quiz 4-A Question 5
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Quiz 4 – A Question

6
When using the Recreational Dive Planner
dive tables, you should ascend (go up) no
faster than _____ per minute.
A. 6 metres/20 feet
B. 12 metres/40 feet
C. 18 metres/60 feet
D. 24 metres/80 feet
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Quiz 4-A Question 6
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Quiz 4 – A Question

7
The maximum depth for all recreational
scuba divers, even experienced divers, is:
A. 18 metres/60 feet.
B. 30 metres/100 feet.
C. 40 metres/130 feet.
D. 58 metres/190 feet.
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Quiz 4-A Question 7
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Quiz 4 – A Question

8
Imagine you dive to a depth of 11
metres/39 feet and stay for 46 minutes.
What would your pressure group (PG) be
on your Recreational Dive Planner?
A. J
B. K
C. P
D. M
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Table
Prescriptive
Wheel
Quiz 4 – A Question

9
Imagine you have made a dive and you have
stayed on the surface for a while. After this
surface interval your pressure group on the
Recreational Dive Planner is K. What is the
maximum amount of bottom time you can use
doing a repetitive (second) dive to 17 metres/56
feet?
A. 16 minutes
B. 44 minutes
C. 29 minutes
D. 26 minutes
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Table
Prescriptive
Wheel
Quiz 4 – A Question

10
After a surface interval your pressure group on the
Recreational Dive Planner is D. You want to do a
repetitive (second) dive to 12 metres/38 feet for 32
minutes. What will be your new pressure group
(PG) when you reach the surface?
A. N
B. P
C. J
D. G
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Prescriptive
Table
Prescriptive
Wheel
Quiz 1 – A
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
Question 2
Buoyancy - the weight of water volume displaced
The heavier the water - the greater the buoyancy for
a given displacement

Salt water weighs more than fresh water

You’re more buoyant in salt water than in fresh

An object neutrally buoyant
in salt water will sink if put
into fresh water
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Quiz 1-A Question 2 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A
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Question 7
In an open container - excess air bubbles out into the
surrounding water during ascent
In a closed flexible container - the air is trapped and
expands as you ascend
10 m/33 ft. is 2 atmospheres
If you inflate a balloon at 10 m/33 ft. and take
it to the surface, it will expand to twice the
size as it was at 10 m/33 ft.
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Quiz 1-A Question 7 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A
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

Question 9
The first stage reduces the high tank pressure to an
intermediate pressure - (7-10 bar/100 to 150 psi)
above surrounding water pressure
The second stage reduces this intermediate pressure
to the water pressure surrounding you
Easy breathing is the most
important feature when selecting
a regulator
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Quiz 1-A Question 9 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A Question

10
All good buddies work together by:

Agreeing on entry, exit points and dive objective

Agreeing upon time and depth limits

Establishing and reviewing communications

Discussing how to stay together –
what to do if separated


Discussing emergency procedures
Convenience, safety and fun
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Quiz 1-A Question 10 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A
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Question 6
Wet suits reduce heat loss - a layer of insulating
foam neoprene over your skin
Wet suits need to have a snug fit
Your body quickly heats the water – as long
as water remains trapped in the suit you
stay warm
If water circulates in and out of
your suit – you lose a lot of heat to
incoming cold water
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Quiz 2-A Question 6 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 9
You may need to communicate with someone on
shore or on a boat while you are at the surface

Use slow and exaggerated movements

Waving your arms at the surface means “HELP!”

To signal you need assistance at the surface
wave your arms or use an inflatable signal tube
that alert boats to your presence at the surface.
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Quiz 2-A Question 9 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A Question

10
To maintain a buddy system on a dive:

Agree on entry, exit point and dive objective

Agree upon time and depth limits

Establish and review communications

Discuss how to stay together –
what to do if separated

Discuss emergency procedures
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Quiz 2-A Question 10 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 2
Vertigo - whirling feeling in which you tend to loose
your balance

A feeling of dizziness and you can become confused

You can feel disorientated in very clear water

To avoid vertigo ascend and descend by using
the bottom contours or a reference line
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Quiz 3-A Question 2 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A
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Question 5
If you see a potentially aggressive animal - remain
still and calm on the bottom
If it stays in the area - calmly swim away along the
bottom, keeping an eye on it and exit the water
Injuries from animals that may seem aggressive,
such as eels and stingrays, actually result from
frightening animals, causing them to react
defensively.
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Quiz 3-A Question 5 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A
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
Question 7
If you have a problem at the surface - immediately
establish buoyancy by either inflating your BCD or
dropping your weights

Let your equipment do the work

Stop, breathe, think, then act. Need Help? Ask!
If you are assisting an injured diver at the surface,
immediately establish positive buoyancy and
check to see if the diver is breathing.
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Quiz 3-A Question 7 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A
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Question 4
During a dive, the increase pressure causes nitrogen
from the air you breathe to dissolve into your body
tissues.
Upon ascent - the excess nitrogen cannot stay
dissolved in your body
Nitrogen begins to come out of solution
As nitrogen dissolves out of your body tissues - the
excess nitrogen forms bubbles
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Quiz 4-A Question 4 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Metric - Enter Table 1 along the top depth row labeled Start

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Question 8
Follow the depth line to the right, use the exact or next greater depth –
in this case the 12 metres column
Follow the 12 metre column down until you find 46 minutes or the next
greater time – in this case 49 minutes
From 49 minutes, follow the horizontal row to the right to letter K
Imperial - Enter Table 1 along the top depth row labeled Start



Follow the depth line to the right, use the exact or next greater depth –
in this case the 40 foot column
Follow the 40 foot column down until you find 46 minutes or the next
greater time – in this case 48 minutes
From 48 minutes, follow the horizontal row to the right to letter K
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Quiz 4-A Question 8 – PLG Table
Quiz 4 – A

Question 9
Metric - Flip the RDP over and find pressure group K along the top row

Along the left side of Table 3 locate 18 metres and follow the row
horizontally to the right until you are under pressure group K

There you’ll find two numbers 30 in the white portion and 26 in the blue
portion


26 minutes is the adjusted no decompression limit
Imperial - Flip the RDP over and find pressure group K along the top row

Along the left side of Table 3 locate 50 feet and follow the row horizontally
to the right until you are under pressure group K

There you’ll find two numbers 29 in the white portion and 26 in the blue
portion

26 minutes is the adjusted no decompression limit
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Quiz 4-A Question 9 – PLG Table
Quiz 4 – A Question

Metric - Flip the RDP over and find pressure group D along the top row


10
Along the left side of Table 3 locate 12 metres and follow the row horizontally to the right until you
are under pressure group D

There you’ll find two numbers 26 in the white portion and 121 in the blue portion

26 minutes RNT + 32 minutes ABT = 58 minutes TBT

Flip the RDP over and along the top depth row find 12 metres

Follow the 12 metre column down until you find 58 minutes or the next greater time

From 62 minutes, follow the horizontal row to the right to fine the letter N
Imperial - Flip the RDP over and find pressure group D along the top row

Along the left side of Table 3 locate 40 feet and follow the row horizontally to the right until you are
under pressure group D

There you’ll find two numbers 25 in the white portion and 115 in the blue portion

25 minutes RNT + 32 minutes ABT = 57 minutes TBT

Flip the RDP over and along the top depth row find 40 feet

Follow the 40 foot column down until you find 57 minutes or the next greater time

From 60 minutes, follow the horizontal row to the right to fine the letter N
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Quiz 4-A Question 10 – PLG Table
Quiz 1 – A
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
Question 1
An object that is
positive – floats
An object that is
negative – sinks
If an object
neither sinks nor
floats it stays
neutral
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Quiz 1-A Question 1 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A
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Question 3
99 divide by 33
equals 3
Add one
atmosphere for
the surface
Total equals 4
atmospheres
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Quiz 1-A Question 3 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A
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Question 4
Air compresses
under weight
Water is weight
As air
compresses the
molecules move
closer together
making the air
more dense
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Quiz 1-A Question 4 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A

Question 5
If the pressure
inside your ear
does not match
the pressure of
the water outside
your ear you’ll
get an ear
squeeze – the
deeper you go
the worse it gets!
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Quiz 1-A Question 5 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A

Question 6
Exhaling through
your nose into
your mask
equalizes the
pressure – this is
why we wear a
mask and not
swimming
goggles
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Quiz 1-A Question 6 - PLG
Quiz 1 – A
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
Question 8
If you hold your
breath you turn
your lungs into a
sealed container
Sealed
containers don’t
allow air to
escape when you
ascend to the
surface
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Quiz 1-A Question 8 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 1
Even though
your eyes can
focus with a
mask, you still
have some
optical effects
because light
travels at
different speeds
in water and in
air
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Quiz 2-A Question 1 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A


Question 2
Sound travels
four times faster
underwater than
in air
It hits your ears
at the same time
- therefore you
have difficulty
telling its
direction
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 2 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 3
No one said
diving had to be
wet or cold – use
the right
exposure suit
protection and
have fun while
you dive!
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 3 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 4
You enjoy most
things in life if
you take your
time – relax,
conserve your
energy and your
air while diving
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 4 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A


Question 5
Deep breathing
is more efficient
breathing
For maximum
breathing
efficiency, you
want to breathe
slowly and
deeply
underwater
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 5 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 7
It doesn’t
happen often but
you might have
to remove your
weight system
quickly – use one
hand
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 7 - PLG
Quiz 2 – A

Question 8
You wear an
alternate air
source for your
buddy – make
sure your buddy
can find it easily
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Question
Quiz 2-A Question 8 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 1
Going
somewhere new
and exciting? –
make sure you
take a local area
orientation and
be informed
about the dive
site
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 1 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 3
Underwater
visibility can be
affected by many
factors – if you
can’t see there’s
no sense diving!
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 3 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 4
You have more
energy at the
start of your dive
so begin your
dive by
swimming
against or into
current – finish
the dive with the
current bringing
you back
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 4 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 6
Stop your
activity, stay
calm, breathe,
and make sure
you’re buoyant if
you’re struggling
at the surface
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 6 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 8
Not looking
where you’re
going? If you get
tangled just stop,
breathe, think
and slowly
untangle
yourself.
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 8 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 9
If you frequently
monitor your
submersible
pressure gauge
you’ll
successfully
avoid low on air
or out of air
situations.
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 9 - PLG
Quiz 3 – A

Question 10
Checking for
breathing and a
pulse is most
important when
caring for an
unresponsive
diver out of the
water.
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Question
Quiz 3-A Question 10 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 1
A diver’s log
book is like a
passport – it tells
you where you’ve
been and when.
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 1 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 2
Enriched air has
some advantages
– but you can
have oxygen
problems using it
within
recreational
depth limits
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 2 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 3
Narcosis impairs
a diver’s
judgment and
coordination, and
may create a
false sense of
security, cause
disregard for
safety and other
foolish behavior.
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 3 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 5
To reduce the
risk of DCS, get
in the habit of
always diving
with a
conservative
margin between
the time you
actually dive, and
the maximum
allowed.
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 5 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 6
Slowly ascend
from every dive.
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 6 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 7
Deep diving
requires special
training – take
an Advance
Course for an
introduction to
what lurks
below!
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 7 - PLG
Quiz 4 – A

Question 8
Side 1 set the white triangle to 11 metres/39 feet – in this
case 12 metres/40 feet

Move yellow pointer triangle to point to 46 minutes

Read up the pointer centerline until it crosses 12 metres/
45 foot depth curve

To the right of this intersection, find the pressure group
whose arrow pierces 12 metres/45 feet - pressure group K
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 8 – PLG Wheel
Quiz 4 – A





Question 9
Side 2 indicated K diver
Side 1 find the letter K in the white p.g. index and the black
arrow that goes with it
Set the tip of this arrow so that it touches (not pierces) the
17 metres/56 foot depth curve – in this case 18 metres/60 feet
Hold the disk in place, rotate the pointer until the centerline is
aligned with the NDL mark on the 18 metres/60 foot curve
The yellow triangle at the end of the pointer should point to
26 minutes maximum allowable bottom time
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 9 – PLG Wheel
Quiz 4 – A Question






10
Side 2 indicated D diver
Side 1 find the letter D in the white p.g. index and the black arrow that
goes with it
Set the tip of this arrow so that it touches (not pierces) the
12 metres/38 foot depth curve – in this case 12 metres/40 feet
Hold the disk in place, rotate the pointer until the centerline is aligned
with 32 minutes
Read up the pointer centerline until it crosses the 12 metres/40 foot
depth curve
Find the pressure groups whose arrow pierces 12 metres/40 feet –
pressure group N
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Question
Quiz 4-A Question 10 – PLG Wheel

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