Course 9-F - City Access New York

Report
Museums
ADA Compliance
January 16, 2013
ADA Titles
 Privately operated museums are covered by Title
III of the ADA
 Museums operated by state or local government
are covered by Title II of the ADA
 Museums that receive Federal funding – whether
covered by Title II or III are also covered by
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
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New Construction & Alterations
 Permits and permit extensions issued after
3/15/2012 must comply with 2010 Standards
 Start of construction to be used where permit is
not issued. This does not mean ceremonies or
site clearing.
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Barrier Removal
 On or after 3/15/2012, elements not complying
with or were not required by the 1991 Standards
must be modified to comply with 2010 Standards
 Elements complying with 1991 Standards not
undergoing alteration after 3/15/2012 do not have
to be modified to comply with new standard
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Historic Buildings
 Give priority to methods that provide physical
access to individuals with disabilities
 Not required to take any action that would
threaten or destroy the historic significance of an
historic property
 However must use alternative methods of
achieving program accessibility
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Historic Buildings
Alternate methods  Using audio-visual materials and devices to
depict those portions of an historic property that
cannot otherwise be made accessible
 Assigning persons to guide individuals with
disabilities into or through portions of historic
properties that cannot otherwise be made
accessible
 Adopting other innovative methods
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New Definitions
 Mobility Device
 Service Animal
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Mobility Device
Two tiered approach
 Wheelchairs and other
devices designed for use
by individuals with mobility
disabilities - canes,
crutches, walkers
 must be permitted in all
areas open to pedestrian
use
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Mobility Device
 Other power-driven mobility devices
(those not primarily designed for use
by individuals with mobility disabilities)
 must be permitted to be used unless
the covered entity can demonstrate
that such use would (i) fundamentally
alter its programs, services, or
activities; (ii) create a direct threat to
others; or (iii) conflict with legitimate
safety requirements
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Service Animals
 Only include a dog that has been individually
trained to do work or perform tasks for the
benefit of an individual with a disability
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Service Animals
 Other animals, wild or domestic, are no longer
considered service animals
 Trained miniature horses may be an exception
 An emotional support animal (any animal that
provides emotional support, well-being, comfort,
or companionship) is not to be considered a
service animal
 However, psychiatric service dogs are
recognized; for example, a dog can be trained to
“ground” a person with a psychiatric disorder
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Assembly - Accessible Seating
Significant reduction in large facilities
 Facilities with 500-5000 seats must have six
accessible seating locations (wheelchair location
and companion seat) plus one additional accessible
seating location for every additional 150 fixed seats
above 500 in the general seating area (800 seat
facility must have 6 + 2 = 8)
 Facilities with 5001 or more fixed seats in the
general seating area must have 36 accessible
seating locations plus one additional accessible
seating location for every 200 fixed seats above
5000 in the general seating area
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Assembly - Accessible Seating
 Individuals who need to use accessible seating
because of a mobility disability
 Individuals who need to use accessible seating
because their disability requires the use of the
accessible features that are provided in
accessible seating
 Companions
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9/7/10
Accessible Seating
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9/7/10
Accessible Seating
Companion seats may be
movable as long as they
provide
• Shoulder-to-shoulder
alignment
• Located at the same floor
elevation as the
wheelchair location
• Size, quality, comfort, &
amenities are equal to
other seating in the area
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9/7/10
Designated Aisle Seats
 Five percent of the total number of aisle seats
 Previously was one percent of all seats
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Assistive Listening Systems
 Number of receivers required is based on
seating capacity Assistive listening systems
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Capacity of Seating in
Assembly Area
Minimum Number of
Required Receivers
50 or less
2
51 to 200
2, plus 1 per 25 seats
over 50 seats
2
201 to 500
2, plus 1 per 25 seats
over 50 seats
1 per 4 receivers
501 to 1000
20, plus 1 per 33 seats
over 500 seats
1 per 4 receivers
1001 to 2000
35, plus 1 per 50 seats
over 1000 seats
1 per 4 receivers
2001 and over
55 plus 1 per 100 seats
over 2000 seats
1 per 4 receivers
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Minimum Number of
Required
Receivers Required to be
Hearing-aid Compatible
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Assistive Listening Systems
 Assistive listening systems are required in
spaces where communication is integral to the
space and audio amplification is provided
 Requirement is no longer tied to having fixed
seats
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Assistive Listening Systems
 Availability must be identified by the
international symbol
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Effective Communication
 Not a New Provision
 Must take appropriate steps to ensure that
communications with people with disabilities are
as effective as communications with others
 Including – Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs),
Captioning, Qualified Interpreters, Large Print,
Braille
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Effective Communication
 Apps for mobile devices can be used to translate
spoken word into ALS, provide audio description
of exhibits, and use GPS as way finding
 Examples –
 Arizona Sonora Desert Museum - visitors can
navigate the 21 acre museum with their smart
phones using app called MyGeoTrex, a GPS-based
app that gives information about the exhibits
 Werribee Open Range Zoo - OpenMi Excursions is
a smart phone app that offers interactive and
accessible learning through captions and Australian
Sign Language
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Sales Counters
 Accessible counter – 36 inches above the
finished floor and identified with access
symbol
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Queue Lines
 Queue lines must be set at least 36 inches wide.
 Queue lines can create a tripping hazard for
individuals with low vision or who are blind.
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Display Labels
 Characters and their background shall have a
non-glare finish.
 Characters shall contrast with their background
with either light characters on a dark background
or dark characters on a light background.
 Additional factors affecting the ease with which
the text can be distinguished from its background
include shadows cast by lighting sources,
surface glare, and the uniformity of the text and
its background colors and textures.
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Example of poor color contrast
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Example of good color contrast
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Display Label
 Minimum character height shall comply with
Table 703.5.5. Viewing distance shall be
measured as the horizontal distance between
the character and an obstruction preventing
further approach towards the sign. Character
height shall be based on the uppercase letter "I".
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703.5.5 Visual Character Height
703.5.5 Visual Character Height
Height to Finish Floor or
Ground
from Baseline of Character
Horizontal Viewing Distance
Minimum Character Height
40 inches
to less than or equal to 70
inches
less than 72 inches
5/8 inch
72 inches and greater
5/8 inch, plus 1/8 inch per foot
of viewing distance above 72
inches
less than 180 inches
2 inches
180 inches and greater
2 inches, plus 1/8 inch per foot
of viewing distance above 180
inches
less than 21 feet
3 inches
21 feet and greater
3 inches, plus 1/8 inch per foot
of viewing distance above 21
feet
Greater than 70 inches
to less than or equal to 120
inches
Greater than 120 inches
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Display Label
 Sloped labels allow inspection by all
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Wall Labels
Height that is comfortable for those seated and
standing is between 48 and 67 inches
Centerline at 54 inches above the floor is
optimum height
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Free-standing Display Case
 36 inches
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Free-standing Display Case
 Best practice
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Free-standing Display Case
 Good Examples
 Bad Example
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Interactive Displays
Reach range
 48 inches maximum and 15 inches minimum for
unobstructed front or side reach
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Interactive Displays
Reach range
 Obstructed front and side reach
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Interactive Displays
Accessible work surface
 Provide at least one station with a minimum of 27
inches of knee clearance underneath work
surface with 17 – 25 inches of depth for knee and
toe clearance underneath the desk/station for
people who use wheelchairs
Toe Clearance
Knee Clearance
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Interactive exhibits
Operable parts
 Provide operable parts that can be used with a
closed fist and mount these parts between 15 and
48 inches above the finished floor
 Ensure that more than 5 pounds of force is not
required to operate the part
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Space Requirements
 Path of travel 36 inch minimum clear width
required with a 60 inch wide passing space every
200 feet
 Best practice – 60 inch wide path
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Limits of Protruding Objects
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Protruding Objects
Bottom edge of
stairway
is less than 80 inches
above floor
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Protruding Objects
 Cane detection
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Protruding Objects
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Protruding Objects
 A sign mounted within the circulation path
protrudes 6 inches and the leading edge is 29
inches above the finished floor
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Protruding Objects
 Exhibit planning – 30 inches above floor and
protrudes more than 4 inches
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Protruding Object
More examples
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Protruding Object
 Less obvious example – protrudes 7 inches at a
54 inches
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Program Access
Virtual tours
Lectures
Handouts
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Restaurants & Bars
 5% of the total number of general seating spaces
and standing spaces at dining surfaces must be
accessible (with accessible knee and toe
clearances) and located
along an accessible route
(100 seats = 5 accessible)
 Previously the number of
accessible seating was based
on the number of dining tables
(20 tables = 1 table)
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Common issues
 Protruding objects
 Effective communication
 Information not provided in various formats
 Labels that do not meet sign requirements
 Printed materials not provided in alternate formats
 Programs not accessible to all patrons
 Insufficient directional signage
 Ancillary spaces (i.e. toilet rooms, coat checks)
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United Spinal Association
75-20 Astoria Boulevard
East Elmhurst, New York 11370
718-803 -3782
[email protected]
www.accessibility-services.com
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