Research Data Management for librarians

Report
Data Management
Planning
Data Management Planning
DMPs are written at the start of a project to define:
 What data will be collected or created?
 How the data will be documented and described?
 Where the data will be stored?
 Who will be responsible for data security and backup?
 Which data will be shared and/or preserved?
 How the data will be shared and with whom?
Why develop a DMP?
DMPs are often submitted with grant applications, but are
useful whenever researchers are creating data.
They can help researchers to:
 Make informed decisions to anticipate & avoid problems
 Avoid duplication, data loss and security breaches
 Develop procedures early on for consistency
 Ensure data are accurate, complete, reliable and secure
Which funders require a DMP?
www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/policy-and-legal/ overview-funders-data-policies
What do research funders want?
 A brief plan submitted in grant applications, and in the
case of NERC, a more detailed plan once funded
 1-3 sides of A4 as attachment or a section in Je-S form
 An outline of data management and sharing plans,
justifying decisions and any limitations
Five common themes / questions
 Description of data to be collected / created
(i.e. content, type, format, volume...)
 Standards / methodologies for data collection &
management
 Ethics and Intellectual Property
(highlight any restrictions on data sharing e.g. embargoes,
confidentiality)
 Plans for data sharing and access
(i.e. how, when, to whom)
 Strategy for long-term preservation
A useful framework to get started
Think about why
the questions are
being asked
Look at examples
to get an idea of
what to include
www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/content/datamanagement/dmp/framework.html
Help from the DCC
https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk
www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/develop-data-plan
Supporting researchers with DMPs
Various types of support could be provided by Surrey:
 Guidelines and templates on what to include in plans
 Example answers, guidance and links to local support
 A library of successful DMPs to reuse
 Training courses and guidance websites
 Tailored consultancy services
 Online tools (e.g. customised DMPonline)
Tips to share: writing DMPs
 Keep it simple, short and specific
 Avoid jargon
 Seek advice - consult and collaborate
 Base plans on available skills and support
 Make sure implementation is feasible
 Justify any resources or restrictions needed
Also see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OJtiA53-Fk
Exercise: My DMP - a satire
 Read through the satirical DMP
 What advice would you give to the researcher who wrote
it?
 You have 20 minutes
My Data Management Plan – a satire, Dr C. Titus Brown
http://ivory.idyll.org/blog/data-management.html
Data sharing
What is data sharing?
“… the practice of making data used for scholarly
research available to others.” [Wikipedia]
Who’s involved?
 the data sharer
 the data repository
 the secondary data user
 support staff!
Reasons to share data
BENEFITS
DRIVERS








Avoid duplication
Scientific integrity
More collaboration
Better research
Increased citation
9-30% increase shown in
study
(Piwowar H. and Vision T.J 2013 ,
https://peerj.com/preprints/1.pdf)
Public expectations
Government agenda
RCUK Data Policy
www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Pages/
DataPolicy.aspx

UKRIO Code of Practice for
Research
www.ukrio.org/what-we-do/codeof-practice-for-research/
The expectation of public access
The RCUK Common Principles state that:
“Publicly funded research data are a public good,
produced in the public interest, which should be
made openly available with as few restrictions as
possible in a timely and responsible manner that
does not harm intellectual property.”
Managing restrictions on sharing
Ethics
Balance data protection with data sharing
 Informed consent – cover current and future use
 Confidentiality – is anonymisation appropriate?
 Access control – who, what, when?
IPR
 Clarify copyright before research starts
 Consider licensing options e.g. Creative Commons
Select formats for data sharing
It’s better to use formats that are:





Unencrypted
Uncompressed
Non-proprietary/patent-encumbered
Open, documented standard
Standard representation (ASCII, Unicode)
Type
Recommended
Research360
Avoid for data sharing
Tabular data
CSV, TSV, SPSS portable
Excel
Text
Plain text, HTML, RTF
PDF/A only if layout matters
Word
Media
Container: MP4, Ogg
Codec: Theora, Dirac, FLAC
Quicktime
H264
Images
TIFF, JPEG2000, PNG
GIF, JPG
Structured data
XML, RDF
RDBMS
Further examples: http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/create-manage/format/formats-table
How to share research data
 Use appropriate repositories and data catalogues
 http://databib.org
 http://www.re3data.org/
 Jisc/DCC research data registry (coming soon!)
 License the data so it is clear how it can be reused
 www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/license-research-data
 Make sure it’s clear how to cite the data
 http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/cite-datasets
 Consider publishing a data paper based on a DMP
 http://metajnl.com/
Exercise: barriers to data sharing
 List one or two of the reasons that researchers
might feel restrict their ability to share their data.
 Are there any actions that could be taken to
reduce or overcome these restrictions?
 You have 10 minutes
Constraints on data sharing
Possible solutions / approaches

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