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KEYS TO PROFESSIONALISM
Instructor: H T Paul Davis, MA, Ed.S
H T Paul Davis, M.A., Ed.S.
Welcome to this class:
Education: I graduated from Liberty University with a MA in Management and
Leadership and a degree as an Educational Specialist (Ed.S.)
Business Profile: Computer instructor, contact lens optician, business manager,
caseworker, juvenile probation officer, drug and alcohol counselor, pastor,
purchasing agent, national sales manager, disc jockey, EMT, teacher, school
principal, safety manager, time-study engineer, bookkeeper, tax preparer, family
therapist, store clerk, soldier, writer, ambulance driver, hospital orderly, and flunky.
Family Profile: I have 7 children, 15 grand-children, was born in Texas and lived all
over. One son is married to a Chinese girl, one daughter married to a Russian,
one daughter married to a Kenyan; one son-in-law is cousin to Peyton and Eli
Manning (four Manning grandsons) – three sons in Texas, 1 son in PA, 2 daughters
in SC, and 1 daughter in PA. My wife is Jewish of Russian origin.
When someone ask my nationality – I am a Texan.
Your Instructor
Mr. H T Paul Davis, M.A.,Ed.S
Instructor
EMAIL: [email protected]
Essential Computer Concepts
3
Cell Phones
•
•
•
WHILE IN THE CLASSROOM YOUR TIME IS VALUABLE. USING
FACEBOOK OR SOCIAL NETWORKING ON YOUR COMPUTER
DURING CLASS WILL LEAVE YOU LESS TIME NEEDED FOR
STUDY. CELLPHONES SHOULD NOT BE USED IN CLASS. IF YOU
RECEIVE A CALL QUIETLY TELL YOUR FRIEND YOU WILL CALL
THEM LATER.
IF IT IS AN EMERGENCY, REQUEST PERMISSION TO EXCUSE
YOURSELF FROM CLASS
There will be times when you have completed assignments and
are waiting for instructions. I know your time at home is also
busy and you will have limited time for doing homework
assignments. Work on homework during class time if you have
free time and save it to your flash drive OR Study your
textbook.
Turned off or on vibrate
4
Attendance Policies
• Attendance: You get an early warning if
you miss more than 10% of your class
• Drops: If you miss 25% of your class you
are dropped and no grade will be received
• There are NO EXCUSED ABSENCES
• You could lose your financial aid if dropped
• The best way to communicate with me is
through email
• Call if you are going to be late
• DO NOT LEAVE CLASS without permission
• DO NOT ask to leave class early unless
there is an emergency
5
LATE ASSIGNMENTS
• No homework assignments will be
accepted if it is late unless permission is
given by the instructor.
• TEST will not be made up during class
time
• IF you are absent on the day of FINAL
EXAM, you cannot make up the test
unless a valid prior arrangement has
been made
MATERIALS REQUIRED
• Textbook: Keys to Professionalism
• Three ring binder – with loose leaf binder paper.
NO torn notebook paper or spiral notebook
paper will be accepted for assignments
• All assignments must be written in pen (BLACK
OR BLUE INK ONLY). Note that in the field this is
a requirement for charting.
• Your binder will serve as a PORTFOLIO. Turn in
items will be neatly placed in your portfolio for
review by the instructor.
Cornell Note
Taking
The Seven
Habits
The Law of
Addition
College is not
high school
Academic
integrity
Emotional
intelligence
Solving
problems
Learning Style
Inventory
Score your
Inventory
Balance
Preferences
VAK – Learning
Styles
Self Awareness
Strengths &
Weaknesses
Styles
Flexibility
DISCOVERY
Introductions
College culture
WELCOME TO COLLEGE
Student Portal
INTRODUCTION
Sanford Brown
Expectations
STUDENT PORTAL AND FORUMS
• Many of your classes will not have
computer assignments but you will
need to know how to access your
student grades and use the student
portal
• Forums: The Seven Habits may be
completed online or turned in
• You will need to have the librarian
give you your logon and password.
SELECT STUDY PARTNER
 Each team member:
 Introduce yourself to the team – share
some likes and dislikes and a little about
family background
 Share professional experiences and work
background – What are your skills,
abilities, interest, and passions?
 Each person share and describe one
strong study skill that you possess and
one study weakness you may have
 Each team member will introduce
another team member to the class and
share a few things learned about their
fellow student
TAKING
NOTES
CORNELL SYSTEM OF NOTE TAKING
• Walter Pauk at Cornell University developed a
system of note taking to help students take
notes and anticipate possible test questions for
exams.
• The page is divided into three sections:
– Left column: cue column for possible test
questions
– Right column: note column
– Summary section: at the bottom of the last
page to write a short summary of the lecture
Effective Note Taking
• Observing – an “event” includes
instruction being given, demonstration,
actions, experiment, presentation
• Recording – making a record of your
observation is note taking. Poor note
taking may result in a poor review and
thus poor recall of the event
• Reviewing
Effective Note Taking
• Sit closer to the front – the human voice
begins to degrade from about 8 feet
• Review your notes at the beginning of
class
• Postpone debate – when you do not
agree with something you hear, jot it
down and discuss later
• Do not let attitudes about your
instructor impede your learning
Effective Note Taking
• Use keywords – note vocabulary words
• Main kinds of keywords are technical
terms, concepts, names, and numbers
• Use a 3 ring binder instead of a
notebook (add handouts, better to
organize notes)
• Use 3 x 5 cards to take notes
• Label and date all notes – refer to page
numbers in your text
THE SEVEN HABITS OF HIGHLY
SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
A book by Steven Covey
HABIT ONE
• Habit 1: Be Proactive: Take initiative in life by
realizing that your decisions (and how they
align with life's principles) are the primary
determining factor for effectiveness in your
life. Take responsibility for your choices and the
subsequent consequences that follow.
• We will be discussing Why College – you are
being proactive by getting an education
• Circumstances do not dictate (be in control
of) responses (Paul Davis).
HABIT TWO
Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind:
Self-discover and clarify your deeply
important character values and life goals.
Envision the ideal characteristics for each
of your various roles and relationships in
life.
What are important characteristics of a
professional person? We will be
discussing values, character, and
professionalism.
HABIT THREE
Habit 3: Put First Things First: Plan,
prioritize, and execute your week's tasks
based on importance rather than
urgency. Evaluate whether your efforts
exemplify your desired character values,
propel you toward goals, and enrich the
roles and relationships that were
elaborated in Habit 2.
This course covers time management,
goals, and planning
HABIT FOUR
• Relationships are more valuable than
possessions
• Habit 4: Think Win-Win: Genuinely strive
for mutually beneficial solutions or
agreements in your relationships. Value and
respect people by understanding a "win"
for all is ultimately a better long-term
resolution than if only one person in the
situation had gotten his way.
HABIT FIVE
Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, Then to be
Understood: Use empathetic listening to be
genuinely influenced by a person, which compels
them to reciprocate the listening and take an open
mind to being influenced by you. This creates an
atmosphere of caring, respect, and positive problem
solving. “No one cares how much you know until they
know how much you care”
We will be discussing communication and culture.
This includes having cultural awareness and
understanding the issues of diversity
HABIT SIX
Habit 6: Synergize: Combine the strengths of
people through positive teamwork, so as to
achieve goals no one person could have done
alone. Get the best performance out of a
group of people through encouraging
meaningful contribution, and modeling
inspirational and supportive leadership.
Leadership is all about influence. This can be
either positive or negative.
HABIT SEVEN
• Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw: Balance
and renew your resources, energy, and
health to create a sustainable, longterm, effective lifestyle. How?
Education, managing your time,
balance in a healthy life style
RELATIONSHIPS ARE MORE
VALUABLE THAN POSSESSIONS
• WITH YOUR TEAM BRAINSTORM AND LIST REASONS
AND EXAMPLES OF THE LAW OF ADDITION
• EACH TEAM TO PRESENT THE LIST TO THE CLASS
• CLASS DISCUSSION
Brainstorm Success: Describe how each of
the following can contribute to your
success: Rank them in importance










Family
Friend
Business relationship
Customer
Supplier
Employer
Teacher
Co-worker
God
Government
Chapter One
WELCOME TO COLLEGE
THE WORLD OF WORK
• Global marketplace
• Digital revolution – the change in how
people communicate
• Knowledge work – primarily concerned
with information
• Skills for the 21st century
HIGHER EDUCATION
• Higher education is not high school
– Difference: focusing on careers
– Difference: cost you money
– Difference: more learning
independence
Henry Ford
“The only real security that a person
can have in this world is a reserve of
knowledge, experience, and ability.
Without these qualities, money is
practically useless.”
Abraham Lincoln
“Give me six hours to cut down a tree
and I will spend the first four hours
sharpening the ax.”
Why Go to College?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
To be a role model for the family
Finish a degree
Improve my chances of being hired
Advance my career
Increase my income potential
For self improvement
To keep the mind active
I enjoy learning
I am curious
Do Not Rule Out Alternatives
•
•
•
•
Start your own business
Technical or vocational schools
Journeyman or craft skills
Advancement in your current
employment
• Write a book
THE CULTURE OF COLLEGE
INDPENDENT LEARNING
– Follow the course syllabus
– Navigate electronic course materials
and learning management systems
– Complete readings with little or no inclass review
– Finish homework even if not
collected or graded
THE CULTURE OF COLLEGE
INDPENDENT LEARNING
– Set up and attend study groups
– Turn in coursework and projects
on time
– Be prepared for exams
– Seek help if needed
THE CULTURE OF COLLEGE
• Fast pace and demanding workload
• Challenging reading and complex
assignments
• Large amount of unstructured time
• Variety of ideas, student backgrounds,
and faculty expectations
• Higher-level thinking and problem
solving (memorizing is not enough)
DISCOVERY
Successful Intelligence
Mindset
Motivation
Educational Success
• FINISHED FILES ARE THE RESULT OF YEARS
OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY COMBINED WITH
THE EXPERIENCE OF MANY YEARS
• FIVE FAMOUS PUBLIC OPINION EXPERTS
FROM WASHINGTON FOUND THAT
FIFTEEN OF THE LEGISLATORS FELL INTO
THE HIGHLY FUNCTIONAL SEGMENT OF
THE FEBRUARY SURVEY
• FINISHED FILES ARE THE RESULT OF YEARS
OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY COMBINED WITH
THE EXPERIENCE OF MANY YEARS
• FIVE FAMOUS PUBLIC OPINION EXPERTS
FROM WASHINGTON FOUND THAT
FIFTEEN OF THE LEGISLATORS FELL INTO
THE HIGHLY FUNCTIONAL SEGMENT OF
THE FEBRUARY SURVEY
21st Century Learning
• CORE SUBJECTS
– Global Awareness
– Financial, economic, business, and
entrepreneurial literacy
– Civic literacy and community service
– Health literacy
• INFORMATION, MEDIA, AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
– Information literacy
– Media literacy
– ICT (Information, communications, and
technical skills
How Can Successful Intelligence
Help You Achieve Your Goals?
• Successful intelligence defined
• Psychologist Robert Sternberg’s
definition of successful intelligence
states that it is “… the kind of
intelligence used to achieve important
life goals.”
Successful Intelligence
• An important concept, and the
theme of the textbook
• Focuses on action, what we do,
rather than on the ability to store,
recall, and analyze information.
• Three types of thinking comprise
successful intelligence: analytical,
creative, and practical.
The Grizzly Bear
17.3 seconds
before he
catches us
There is no
way we can
outrun the
bear
That’s true.
All I have to
do is outrun
you!
Analyzed
Created Options
Practical action
Elements of Successful Intelligence
Successful
Intelligence
Analytical
Thinking
Creative
Thinking
Practical
Thinking
Comparing,
contrasting,
and cause and
effect thinking
Taking what
you know and
thinking about
it in a different
way
Learning from
experience and
emotional
intelligence
Elements of Successful Intelligence
(continued)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Analytical
Creative
Examine
Assess
Measure
Compare
Contrast
Evaluate
• Generate
(new ideas)
• Brainstorm
• Question
• Risk
making
mistakes
• “Think
outside of
the box”
Practical
•
•
•
•
•
•
Take action
Implement
Employ
Delegate
Do it
Start,
Finish
How Can a Growth Mindset
Motivate You to Persist?
• Growth mindset:
A perception that
talent and
intelligence can
develop with
effort
• Mindsets are just
beliefs
• Can you change
your mind?
The Fixed Mindset –
Characterized by
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fear of mistakes
Lack of willingness to try challenging things
Being personally defined by failure
Hesitancy to put forth effort
Feeling paralyzed by problems and setbacks
Belief that intelligence/ability is fixed
Escaping and blaming others
The Growth Mindset –
Characterized by
•
•
•
•
Seeking, and thriving on, challenge
Willingness to put forth effort
Belief that intelligence/ability can grow
Willingness to address failure/mistakes and
learn from them
• Readiness to face problems/setbacks
• Understanding that failure/mistakes don’t
define the person
• Looking for solutions and taking action
Strategies to Change Your
Mindset
• Stop negative talk in its tracks and
change it to positive talk
• Take a moment every day to pay
yourself a general compliment
• Replace words of obligation (I
should) with words of personal
intent (I will)
• Note your successes
Motivation
MOTIVATION IS – A GOAL DIRECTED
FORCE THAT MOVES A PERSON TO
ACTION
MOTIVATION
• Motivation – a goal directed force that
moves you to action
• Mindset – motivation involves your
attitudes. You cannot control all of your
circumstances but you can control your
mindset
Motivation
• What will keep you going when you
do not feel like it?
– When you lack motivation
– Make a change
– Sweeten the task
– Take baby steps (break down the task)
– Count the cost
– Planning for later is not always
procrastination
EDUCATIONAL SUCCESS
Academic Integrity
Emotional Intelligence
Problem Solving
Decision Making
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
The five values of academic integrity are:
1. Honesty - search for truth, avoiding
plagiarism, critical thinking
2. Trust – true to your word
3. Fairness – clear standards and
procedures
4. Respect – safe environment for
exchanging ideas and opinions
5. Responsibility – in making choices
and obtaining goals
The Benefits of Academic Integrity
Doing the
right thing
increases
self-esteem
Standing up
for your
beliefs earns
respect from
others
Academic
Integrity
Mastering
integrity now
makes it a
lifelong skill
Earned
knowledge
equals lasting
knowledge
• Stinking thinking and ethical decision
making go hand in hand
• On the job: everybody does it; we did
not have that conversation; I do not
want to know what happened
• At school: cheating, plagiarism
– We learn less
– Violates integrity; easier to do again
– Lowers our self-esteem
http://www.customwritings.com/term-papers.html
CustomWritings.com is an online custom term paper
service, which is committed to custom writing of
original term papers of great quality and
professionalism for each customer in making term
papers for money, on-time delivery and creative work
carried out by qualified writers, who are experienced
in writing academic mid-term papers.
Note: I am not advising you to use this site and would
fail a student that would if the paper was used for
academic purposes.
A student friend is having difficulty writing a thesis paper and has
found a web site that sells “custom written papers” to students
that “do not have time” to do their own research. The web site
guarantees that each paper is plagiarism free.
The student friend decides to turn in the paper as their own
work and tells you it is plagiarism free. Write a one page paper
that answers the following questions: (Paper must be a minimum
of three paragraphs).
1. What is the definition of plagiarism?
2. Under what circumstances could your friend use a “paper for
sale”?
3. Could your friend turn in the paper and claim it as his/her
own paper?
4. What suggestions could you give to your friend that would
help them change their mind or make a different decision?
Why Do You Need
Emotional Intelligence?
• Success in a diverse world depends on
effective relationships
• Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso define
emotional intelligence as the ability to
understand “one’s own and other’s
emotions and the ability to use this
information as a guide to thinking and
behavior.”
Emotional Intelligence (EI)
• When you understand what you
and others feel, you can adjust
thoughts and choose actions
based on that understanding
• Thoughts and emotions are linked;
emotions influence both what you
think and how you think
Emotional Intelligence (EI)
(continued)
• People with high EI have better
communication and stronger
relationships
• Managers with high EI have more
personal integrity and are more
productive
• Employees with high EI are more
likely to receive positive ratings and
salary increases
Emotional Intelligent Approach
Problem Solving
And Decision Making
PROBLEM SOLVING
PROBLEM SOLVING
Define the problem
THINKING SKILLS
STEP 1
DEFINE
DECISION
MAKING
Define decision by
identifying the goal
Analyze the problem –
gather information,
break it down
STEP 2
ANALYZE
What are the needs and
motives?
Generate possible
solutions
STEP 3
CREATE
Look at different options
Evaluate solutions and
options from step 3
Put the solution to
work
Evaluate results
In the future, apply
what you have learned
STEP 4
ANALYZE
(EVALUATE)
Look at pros and cons
STEP 5
TAKE PRACTICAL
ACTION
Acts on your decision, use
practical strategies, stay on
target
STEP 6
RE-EVALUATE
Did you get the results you
wanted?
STEP 7
TAKE PRACTICAL
ACTION
Make the same choice or
find a better one
PROBLEM SOLVING EXERCISE
•
•
BREAK UP INTO TEAMS
EACH TEAM WILL SELECT ONE PROBLEM ASSOCIATED WITH SCHOOL:
(EXAMPLES)
–
–
–
•
•
•
•
•
•
Financial Aid or enrollment process
A fear or challenge that might be anticipated
The possibility of a bad instructor
NOTE THE PROBLEM UNDER THE “DEFINE THE PROBLEM” BOX
THE TEAM WILL GENERATE AN ANALYSIS OF THE PROBLEM
USING THE FORM PROVIDED: Record at least three possible solutions with
the positive and negative effects
THE TEAM WILL COMPARE AND DISCUSS THE SOLUTIONS AND THEN VOTE
ON THE BEST SOLUTION
UNDER “PRACTICAL ACTION” RECORD A PLAN FOR PUTTING THE SOLUTION
TO WORK AND THE POSSIBLE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE EFFECTS FOR THE
PLAN.
UNDER FINAL EVALUATION: Discuss and make notes about using a group
process for solving problems. Is it easier or harder than doing it alone?
What is different about using a group process?
Learning Is For Anyone
• The story of Patrick Hughes
• http://www.youtube.com/watch_pop
up?v=9xwCG0Ey2Mg
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o
5IO8V7CmSc&feature=related
• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o
5IO8V7CmSc&feature=related
LEARNING STYLES
CHAPTER TWO
Assessing Learning
There are many ideas about
learning preferences and how
to measure them. This book
focuses on two assessments:
•Multiple Pathways to
Learning
•Personality Spectrum
The Two Assessments
• Multiple Pathways to Learning
– Based on the Multiple
Intelligences theory of Howard
Gardner
– Focuses on eight
“intelligences” or areas of
ability
– Be sure to “rate” the items in
the assessment
GARDNER – MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE
PERSONALITY ASSESSMENTS
• Personality Spectrum
– Based on the Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator (MBTI) and the Keirsey
Sorter
– Measures personality traits and
how they combine into four
dimensions
– Be sure to “rank” the items in the
assessment
Theory of Multiple Intelligences
• Based on the belief that the traditional
intelligence quotient or “IQ” test was an
insufficient measure of intelligence
• Gardner defines an intelligence as
– “… an ability to solve problems or
create products that are of value in a
culture.”
• Intelligence is a combination of what
one is born with and what may be
developed
Differentiating Successful Intelligence
from Multiple Intelligences
Sternberg’s
Successful Intelligence
• Focuses on how people
process and apply
information to learn
• Concentrates on
processes – thinking
analytically, creatively, and
practically about a
situation
Gardner’s
Multiple Intelligences
• Focuses on how people
intake information to
learn
• Concentrates on domains
- verbal, logical,
kinesthetic, visual,
interpersonal,
intrapersonal, musical, or
naturalistic
MULTIPLE PATHWAYS
Take the assessment on page 41 and score yourself on page 42.
DO THIS NOW IN CLASS
Another Theory:
Sensory Learning Preferences
• Referred to with the acronym VAK, VAKT, or
VARK: Visual, Auditory, [Read-Write],
Kinesthetic [Tactile]
• The results of the VAK can facilitate
intentional use of your preferred sense(s)
for taking in information, studying, and
learning.
• What overlap do you see with Multiple
Intelligences theory?
VISUAL, AUDITORY, KINETIC
•
•
•
A Visual learning style has a preference for seen or observed things,
including pictures, diagrams, demonstrations, displays, handouts, films, flipchart, etc. These people will use phrases such as ‘show me’, ‘let’s have a
look at that’ and will be best able to perform a new task after reading the
instructions or watching someone else do it first. These are the people who
will work from lists and written directions and instructions.
An Auditory learning style has a preference for the transfer of information
through listening: to the spoken word, of self or others, of sounds and
noises. These people will use phrases such as ‘tell me’, ‘let’s talk it over’ and
will be best able to perform a new task after listening to instructions from
an expert. These are the people who are happy being given spoken
instructions over the telephone, and can remember all the words to songs
that they hear!
A Kinesthetic learning style has a preference for physical experience touching, feeling, holding, doing, practical hands-on experiences. These
people will use phrases such as ‘let me try’, ‘how do you feel?’ and will be
best able to perform a new task by going ahead and trying it out, learning
as they go. These are the people who like to experiment, hands-on, and
never look at the instructions first!
Visual, Auditory, Kinetic
• Complete the VAK Test
from your instructor
• How does your learning
style fit with your chosen
career?
Personality Theory and
Preferred Modes of Interaction
• Grouping people according to personality
type was popularized by psychologist Carl
Jung. He defined:
– An individual’s “preferred world” –
people and activities or thoughts and
feelings
– Different ways of dealing with the world
(sensing, thinking, intuiting, and feeling)
• The mother/daughter team of Briggs and
Myers developed the Myers-Briggs Type
Inventory (MBTI)
Personality Theory and
Preferred Modes of Interaction
• Insights into personality can
“…help you understand how you
respond to the world around you,
including people, work, and
school.”
• Personality may also guide
decisions about majors and
careers
Personality Spectrum Identifies
Four Dimensions
• The Personality
Spectrum “…helps
you identify the kinds
of interactions that
are most, and least,
comfortable for you.”
• Dimensions can
change over time in
reaction to new
experiences, effort,
and practice.
•
•
•
•
Thinker
Organizer
Giver
Adventurer
Scoring Personality Spectrum
DO THIS NOW IN CLASS
PAGES 44 AND 45.
TAKE THE
ASSESSMENT AND
PLOT YOUR
PERSONALITY
SPECTRUM SCORE
ON THE DIAGRAM
How Can You Use SelfKnowledge?
• In the classroom
– Recognize matches/mismatches
between yourself and your instructor
– Note matches/mismatches among
classmates
– Manage mismatches by asking for
additional help from the instructor,
finding a tutor, or joining a study
group
How Can You Use Self-Knowledge?
(continued)
• Choose study strategies that work for your
style
• Choose technology that is appropriate for
your style
• Select a major and a career plan that make
the most of your strengths
• Draw on your insights to be an effective
employee and team player
MIND MAP
• Using the example on page 60 – draw
a mind map on a separate sheet of
paper
• Include your personality spectrum and
intelligences
• Include your interest
• Include your preferred teaching style
• Include “how I study best”
OVER THE WEEKEND
• READ CHAPTERS ONE AND TWO
• QUIZ 1 ON MONDAY
• Forum 1 must be complete by
Monday

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