Philosophy of Process Education

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Philosophy of Process Education
• Term first used in the early 1970’s.
• Defined as: An educational philosophy
which focuses on building students’
learning skills and developing “selfgrowers.”
• Pacific Crest: www.pcrest.com
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Self-Grower
• The two extremes for classifying learners are:
– Trained Individuals
– Self-Growers
• Trained Individuals have developed a specific
knowledge base, with specific skills for a specific
context.
• Self-Growers continually grow by using strong
self-assessment skills to improve future
performance.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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POGIL Project
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Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning
An NSF supported project for Chemistry
www.pogil.org
One and three day workshops available
Can be used by any and all disciplines
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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POGIL Project
• POGIL is a classroom and laboratory
technique that seeks to simultaneously teach
content and key process skills such as the
ability to think analytically and work
effectively as part of a collaborative team.
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R. John Muench
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POGIL Project
• A POGIL classroom or lab consists of any number of
students working in small groups on specially designed
guided inquiry materials.
• These materials supply students with data or information
followed by leading questions designed to guide them
toward formulation of their own valid conclusions essentially a recapitulation of the scientific method.
• The instructor serves as facilitator, observing and
periodically addressing individual and classroom-wide
needs.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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POGIL Project
• POGIL is based on research indicating that
– a) teaching by telling does not work for most students,
– b) students who are part of an interactive community
are more likely to be successful, and
– c) knowledge is personal; students enjoy themselves
more and develop greater ownership over the material
when they are given an opportunity to construct their
own understanding.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Measuring Success
• Eight years of data at Franklin & Marshall
College.
• Lecture only – DFW rate = 32%.
• POGIL + mini-lecture – DFW rate = 19%.
• This is just one of many examples of the
proof that POGIL improves student
performance.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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How It Works
• Students work in teams as determined by
the instructor.
• Instructor may provide a mini-lecture or
students may be required to read a short
passage.
• Students then work collaboratively on a list
of questions that are meant to guide them
through the material.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Types of Questions
• A POGIL activity has a variety of questions.
– Convergent: Students will come to a quick agreement.
Asks them to recall basic knowledge.
– Directed: Students can be led down the path to the
answer based on information given. Asks them to
apply what they have learned.
– Divergent: Groups can come up with alternate
solutions. Often not seeking a solution, rather a
discussion. Asks them to synthesize information.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Instructor Role
• Act as Facilitator in the classroom.
• Intervene when the team is off on the wrong
track or not using the process.
• Adjust and adapt to each class.
• Answer student questions with a question
that can help lead them down the right path.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Keys to POGIL Use
• Establish teams and process early on.
• Students have two roles – learning and
helping others learn.
• Don’t give out answers.
• Correct any group mistakes at the beginning
of the next period.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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Assessment
• POGIL website has an assessment guide.
• Include self-assessment component.
• Include assessment on the process to gain
insight on how to improve the assignment.
7/17/2015
R. John Muench
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