Unit 9: Teaching Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary

Report
Brandy Meetze
North East Florida Educational Consortium
www.nefec.org
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 Purpose: Determine
what distinguished the
reading performance of students likely to
succeed in college and not.
• Process:
 Set benchmark score on the reading test
shown to be predictive of success in college
(“21” on ACT composite score)
 Looked at results from a half million students.
 Divided texts into three levels of complexity:
uncomplicated, more challenging, and
complex.
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Performance on the ACT Reading Test by
Comprehension Level
(Averaged across Seven Forms)
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Performance on the ACT Reading Test by
Textual Element
(Averaged across Seven Forms)
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Performance on the ACT Reading Test by
Degree of Text Complexity
(Averaged across Seven Forms)
.
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 Performance
on complex texts is the
clearest differentiator in reading
between students who are more likely to
be ready for college and those who are
less likely to be ready.
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Question type and level (main idea, word meanings, details)
is NOT the chief differentiator between student scoring
above and below the benchmark.
The degree of text complexity in the passages acted as the
“sorters” within ACT. The findings held true for both males
and females, all racial groups and was steady regardless of
family income level.
What students could read, in terms of its complexity--rather
than what they could do with what they read—is greatest
predictor of success.
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Year/Grade
Level
K
1
2
3-8
9-12
2011-2012
FL
L
L
L
L
2012-2013
FL
FL
L
L
L
2013-2014
FL
FL
FL
BL
BL
FL
FL
FL
FL
FL
CCSS fully
implemented
2014-2015
CCSS fully
implemented and
assessed
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Text Complexity & Text-based
Questions
 Reading Standards include over exemplar texts (stories and
literature, poetry, and informational texts) that illustrate
appropriate level of complexity by grade
 Text complexity is defined by:
1. Qualitative measures – levels of meaning,
structure, language conventionality and
clarity, and knowledge demands
2. Quantitative measures – readability and other
scores of text complexity
3. Reader and Task – background knowledge of
reader, motivation, interests, and complexity
generated by tasks assigned
Reader and Task
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



An instructional model based upon research evidence
introduced last year to Florida’s teachers.
The model assists teachers of students in implementing
whole-class examination of difficult texts and build
students’ specialized knowledge.
This sequence helps students grasp textual nuances
they would not understand on their own.
It is a “text-dependent” approach, ensuring the close
examination of key text details and utilizes complex
text.
Teaching Students to Think as They Read
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STANDARDS
• Do not plan your lesson by first
selecting the text, but always begin
with the standards
• If you are teaching a content area text,
your standards should include
Common Core literacy standards while
focusing on NGSS standards for your
content
 SC.912.L.16.10
: Heredity and Reproduction
Evaluate the impact of biotechnology on the
individual society and the environment,
including medical and ethical issues
 LA.910.1.7.3: The student will determine the
main idea or essential message in gradelevel text through inferring, paraphrasing,
summarizing, and identifying relevant
details
6. (9-10)Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, defining the question theauthor seeks to
address.
6. (11-12)Analyze the author’s purpose in
providing an explanation, describing a
procedure, or discussing an experiment in a
text, identifying important issues that remain
unresolved.




Once you have your standard selected, you
can then choose text appropriate in content
and adequately complex
The internet is full of public domain
literature and content-specific news
Use a resource like interventioncentral.org
to give a baseline readability level
Either use the literacy standard mapped
out, or choose one that is the best fit for
your article
 Text
should be complex for the
students intended to use it
 Try to use text that lends itself to
opposing views and deep discussion
 Try to use text that allows for crosscurricular connections
 Try to use text that will encourage
students to think more globally
Step One
Before reading:
Would you eat genetically modified
foods?
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Before text reading: Use the Essential
Question Handout to record your answer
to this question:
Predict what you think are the potential
risks and benefits of genetically modified
organisms.
Base your response on your current background
knowledge.
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• Words for Vocabulary Word Wall:
 Words introduced in this section:
biodegradable, herbicide, pesticide,
pathogen, antibodies,
 Words introduced previously in textreading
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•
Listen as the facilitator reads the following text:
Genetically Modified Foods: Harmful or
Helpful?
Question: What are the potential risks and
benefits of genetically modified organisms?
Mark the text with the following codes:
A – agricultural applications
M – medical applications
E – environmental applications
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After text marking:
 In
small groups, compare and discuss
differences in text coding.
 Support your suggested answers from the
text.
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After the initial reading, use the Essential
Question Handout in the participant
notebook to answer the following
question:
According to the text, what are the
potential risks and benefits of
genetically modified organisms?
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Step Two
 Guiding
Question: What are some of
the arguments surrounding
genetically modified organisms?
 Risk
 Benefit
 Neither
 Be
sure to utilize the text features as
you take notes
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Compare
notes in pairs or small
groups
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Take
a position and discuss
whether the benefits of genetically
modified organisms are worth the
risks. Use text to justify all
positions.
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What do we not know right now about
what we buy and eat and take as
medicine?
Generate questions unanswered from your first
text reading. Record your questions on your
Student Question Generation paper as you
work in pairs or small groups.
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Share questions with the whole group to identify which
are common, and which questions are most relevant to
the topic and/or significant to learning
Record/post common and relevant/significant questions
on the Question Generation Poster for future use in:
*extended text discussion
*seeking answers in text-reading throughout the
remainder of the chapter/unit
* focusing on unanswered questions in collaborative
inquiry.
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Step Three
According to the text, who or what is most
impacted by genetically modified organisms?
Use information from notes to help write final
response on the Essential Question Handout.
Share answers in small groups.
As part of whole class discussion, record responses
to the essential question in multiple choice format.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Using background knowledge, i.e., predicting,
inferring
Identifying key ideas from text
Learning and using text structures
Monitoring comprehension and employing fix-up
strategies
Using a variety of reading strategies effectively
Paraphrasing, explaining, and summarizing
information to construct conclusions
Engaging in question generation
Extended text discussion and writing
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