Assessment According to AusVELS

Report
CPL Australian Curriculum Conference
Toorak College, Victoria, 23-24 July 2012
1. I need to know if I need to change my existing
assessment practices to fit the Australian
Curriculum in Victoria
2. I want to find practical ways to assess learning
according to the Australian Curriculum in
Victoria
3. I am wondering about the relationship between
VELS and the Australian Curriculum in AusVELS
To evaluate some
practical examples of
assessment in science
Science
Curriculum
Australian
Curriculum
To discuss AusVELS
assessment in school
science programs
VELS
To identify similarities
between VELS and the
Australian Curriculum
 Are
• based on an understanding of how students learn
• an integral component of course design
• ongoing rather than episodic
• valid, reliable and consistent
 Improve
student performance through
• clarity of purpose, goals, standards and criteria
• a variety of measures
• feedback and reflection
 Formative
assessments
• are implemented frequently and interactively
• include both formal and informal modes
• identify learning needs
• inform teaching practices
 Summative
assessment and reporting
• shows what the student has achieved
• may compare progress with others
• may refer to a student’s past performance
1985 Curriculum
Frameworks
P-12:
Science
Framework
CSF I
1970s
School
Centric
Frameworks
1890s
Autocratc
Centrally
Mandated
1995 Curriculum
& Standards
Framework I
Science Strand
2005 Victorian
Essential
Learning
Standards
CSF II
2013
Australian
Curriculum
VELS
Describes
what
students
should
“bedetail
able
to
know
andparticipation
do
inthe
eight
key
Curriculum
“The systems
CSFdiversity,
aims
Frameworks
to
provide
sufficient
for
contents
schools
and
of
Ministerial
“equality,
devolution
of elaborates
authority
and
community
“the
of
publicP-12
instruction
inthe
New
South
Wales
and
[are]
reflected
Inbe
the
framework
which
the
Interim
of the
areas
of
learning
at
keythat
intervals
from
the
Preparatory
year
to Year
Paper
community
No.
6 to
and
states
clear
about
thewithin
the
Education
major
elements
Department
of Committee
curriculum
“is
committed
Victoria
are
severely
autocratic”
Schools
(and
the
Schools
Commission
since)
to
improve
10”.(p.1)
– whilst,
content
knowledge
was
specified
in sought
detail,
schools
to
and
school-based
theCommission
steps
towards
decision
achieving
making
them
about
without
curriculum”
dictating
to
schools
Hill,
Henry
(1891).
Education.
The
School
Systems
of
Australia.
Napier,
pp.10-11
(Henry
the
quality
ofthey
schooling
Australia.”
Bambach
J.inD.
(1979)
continued
to be
free
to interpret
those
specifications
in
their own
way
was
ateachers
New Zealand
inspector
of schools
who visited
Australia
1891).
andoverall
how
are
toinexercise
their
responsibilities.”
(p.1)
2000 Curriculum &
Standards
Framework II
Science Strand
Strand
Domain
Dimension
Standard
Use particle
model
Maths
SKU
Cell structure
& function
Disciplinary
Science
Lab safety
[email protected]
Measurement
accuracy
 Organisation
• Rationale and aims
• Six overarching ideas
• Cross-curriculum priorities
 Guidance for assessment of learning
• Content descriptions (& elaborations)
• Science Achievement standards
• General capabilities & achievement standards
• Annotated work samples
 What is AusVELS?
• AusVELS is the Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum for
Victorian government and Catholic schools for
implementation from 2013.
• http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/
 AusVELS includes:
• outlines of essential learning
• the Australian Curriculum F-10 for English, Mathematics,
History and Science.
• a single, coherent and comprehensive set of common
achievement standards
 Victorian Government:
• Intends to implement AusVELS from 2013
• This is currently the subject of industrial action
between the AEU and the Victorian Government
 Catholic schools in Victoria:
• Plan to implement AusVELS as an F-10
Curriculum from 2013
 Independent schools in Victoria:
• are not required to implement VELS, but
• must implement the Australian Curriculum
(http://www.independentschools.vic.edu.au/schools/curriculum/index.htm)
 Links
assessment to reporting by means
of Progression Points in VELS
A
similar system could be implemented
in Victoria for AusVELS
 The
five point scale was specified by the
by the Commonwealth Government as a
condition of funding to schools.
The ratings reflect a student’s achievement in
his/her year level at the time of reporting.
Rating Descriptor
A
well above the standard expected
B
above the standard expected
C
at the standard expected & on track
D
below the standard expected
E
well below the standard expected
Vertical
model
(Vic & others)
Horizontal
model (NSW)
A
B
C
C
D
E
One year
ahead
Six months
ahead
Expected
achievement
One year behind
18 months behind
5.50
5.75
Mastery?
OR
On- balance?
Assumes a normal distribution
 Assumes a Year 10 cohort
 84% of students are shown with a “C” or higher

> 84% of students awarded “C” or higher
Students that have demonstrated
the standards required at the time
of assessment
English
(Literacy)?

Personal
Learning

ICT?


Mathematics
(Numeracy)?

Science 
Thinking
Processes

Communication
Interpersonal
Learning

Civics and
Citizenship?

Domain
Dimensions
Description
Science


Personal
Development


Science Knowledge
and Understanding
Science at Work
Managing Personal
Learning
Interpersonal
Development

Team work
Communication

Presentation
Thinking

Reasoning,
processing and
inquiry















Content knowledge and understanding as demonstrated through formal and
informal assessments
Knowledge and performance of scientific inquiry
Completion of learning tasks, including homework
Meeting deadlines
Self-assessment and improvement
Collaboration with others
Capacity to reflect on the performance of teams and make improvements
Leading others in scientific investigations
Experimental reports written in the correct format
Correct use of the relevant scientific language & terms
Mode and clarity of presentation in various formats
Ability to interpret and analyse information
Problem-solving ability
Ability to design, evaluate and improve experimental procedures and
investigations
Ability to choose appropriate experimental instruments for particular
applications
Ability to identify further questions arising from an experimental
investigation
Overlap in science
concepts & content
Similar emphasis on
science knowledge,
processes & society
Principles are
transferable
Similar emphasis on
“non-disciplinary”
knowledge and abilities
VCAA retains control
over curriculum &
assessment in Victoria
 Literacy
 Numeracy
 Information
and communication
technology (ICT) capability
 Critical and creative thinking
 Personal and social capability
 Ethical behaviour
 Intercultural understanding.
 “The
development of learning continua for
the General Capabilities is still being
undertaken by ACARA.”
 “AusVELS
will continue to use the current
Physical, Personal and Social Learning and
Interdisciplinary Learning strands until that
work has been completed and a process of
validation undertaken.”

http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities
 “Teachers
are expected to teach and assess
general capabilities to the extent that they
are incorporated within each learning area.”
 “State
and territory school authorities will
determine whether and how student
learning of the general capabilities will be
further assessed and reported.”

ACARA (2012, Jan) General Capabilities in the Australian
Curriculum
At Level 10, students discriminate in the way they use
a variety of sources.
 They generate questions that explore perspectives.
 They process and synthesise complex information
and complete activities focusing on problem solving
and decision making which involve a wide range and
complexity of variables and solutions.
 They employ appropriate methodologies for
creating and verifying knowledge in different
disciplines.
 They make informed decisions based on their
analysis of various perspectives and, sometimes
contradictory, information.

Victorian Essential Learning Standards
at Brighton Secondary College
Australian Curriculum
(AusVELS)
Presentation
Literacy
Reasoning, Processing and Inquiry
Numeracy
Managing Personal Learning
ICT
Reasoning, Processing and Inquiry
Thinking skills
Working in Teams
Teamwork
Managing Personal Learning
Self management
Science at Work
Science
Science Knowledge and Understanding
Science
 Stage
1: Implement English, Mathematics,
Science and History within the current
VELS structure (AusVELS)
 Stage
2: Implement a revised VELS
structure that reflects the full Australian
Curriculum
Prac Reports
Media
articles
Audio-visual
presentations
Written
Assignments
Posters
In 2013, VELS
Presentation will
become
AusVELS Literacy
within Science
Assessment at
Brighton
Secondary
College
 Composing texts (e.g. Prac reports)
• compose sustained learning area texts for a wide
range of purposes incorporating and evaluating:
 researched information
 a range of complex language features to explore, interpret
and analyse challenging and complex issues
 Presentations (e.g. oral presentation)
• plan, research, rehearse and deliver presentations
on learning area topics, combining visual and
multimodal elements creatively to present opinions
and to engage and persuade an audience
• VELS Level 6
• Domain:
Communication
• Dimension:
Presentation
Refer
Write
• Progression
• Five
indicators
• 5.50 to 6.50
• Choose a
progress point
• Evaluate the
rubric
• Other domains?
Assess
• Tests
• Expts and
prac
projects
* Knowledge
* Reasoning
• Assignments
* Presentation
* Reasoning
* Knowledge
* Sci @ work
* Teamwork
* Presentation
* Reasoning
* Sci @ work
* Knowledge
* Reasoning,
* Sci @ work
• Application
& analysis
tasks
By the end of Year 10, students analyse how the periodic table organises elements and use it
to make predictions about the properties of elements. They explain how chemical reactions
are used to produce particular products and how different factors influence the rate of
reactions. They explain the concept of energy conservation and represent energy transfer
and transformation within systems. They apply relationships between force, mass and
acceleration to predict changes in the motion of objects. Students describe and analyse
interactions and cycles within and between Earth’s spheres. They evaluate the evidence for
scientific theories that explain the origin of the universe and the diversity of life on Earth.
They explain the processes that underpin heredity and evolution. Students analyse how the
models and theories they use have developed over time and discuss the factors that
prompted their review.
Students develop questions and hypotheses and independently design and improve
appropriate methods of investigation, including field work and laboratory experimentation.
They explain how they have considered reliability, safety, fairness and ethical actions in
their methods and identify where digital technologies can be used to enhance the quality of
data. When analysing data, selecting evidence and developing and justifying conclusions,
they identify alternative explanations for findings and explain any sources of uncertainty.
Students evaluate the validity and reliability of claims made in secondary sources with
reference to currently held scientific views, the quality of the methodology and the
evidence cited. They construct evidence-based arguments and select appropriate
representations and text types to communicate science ideas for specific purposes.
 Tel: (03)
9592-7488
 Email: [email protected]
 Web: http://www.brightonsc.vic.edu.au/



Bambach, J. D. (1979) "Australia in the 1970's : A Fertile Context for
Educational Experimentation and Innovation," Australian Journal of
Teacher Education: Vol. 4: Iss. 1, Article 3. Available at:
http://ro.ecu.edu.au/ajte/vol4/iss1/3
http://www.education.unimelb.edu.au/curriculumpoliciesproject/
Reports/victoria.html
Principles and protocols for reporting on schooling in Australia,
http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/Principles_and_P
rotocols_2009.pdf

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