Communication

Report
Communication - Leadership
Learning Objectives
 By the end of this chapter, students should be able to do
the following:
 Define the difference between a leader and leadership
 Identify the three Leadership Styles and which
leadership style they possess
 Understand the six Planks of Leadership
 Understand the four Pitfalls to Leadership
 Understand and apply the Four Step Plan to Conflict
Management
 Identify the four Learning Styles and which style fits
them best
Terms and Vocabulary
Leader: The person who directs or who is in
charge of others
Leadership: Focuses on the talents, qualities,
and skills that the leader uses to influence
people.
Technocrat: Leads by having a strong sense of
the bottom line and often spends more time
figuring out numbers and strategy than figuring
out people.
Artist: Leads by imagination and intuition. The
artist has a distinct vision of the “big picture.”
Vision: The ability to see more than just the
obvious.
Craftsman: Leads by common sense and
integrity. Can be trusted, is well-balances,
and an excellent listener.
Blending: Combines leadership styles to get
the best overall approach to leadership.
Learning Styles: The ways that people learn
most effectively.
Conflict Management: The ability to turn a
potentially negative situation into a positive
one.
Notes – Leadership and Learning
Styles
Leader: The person who directs or who is in
charge of others.
Leadership: Focuses on the talents,
qualities, and skills that the leader uses to
influence people.
Notes – Leadership Styles
 The Technocrat: Leads by having a strong sense of
the bottom line and often spends more time figuring out
numbers and strategy than figuring out people.
 A “my way or the highway” approach to motivating
others
 The only voice that the Technocrat wishes to hear is
his or her own and others often follow because they
are afraid to do so.
 Intense, detail oriented, hard headed, and refuses to
compromise.
Notes – Leadership Styles
The Artist: Leads by imagination and intuition.
Even though he or she doesn’t know how all of
the pieces fit together, the Artist has a distinct
vision of the “big picture.”
Invites others to share ideas and isn’t afraid to
show emotion or laughter.
Goes after new ideas and sees things from a
different prospective.
Original and creative.
Notes – Leadership Styles
 The Craftsman: Leads by common sense and integrity.
 Can be trusted, is well-balanced, and an excellent
listener.
 Draws followers because the Craftsman is a caring,
logical person who values getting the job done, but
refuses to sacrifice people and their views and feelings in
the process.
 Predictable and seems to “have it all together.”
 Isn’t afraid to venture into creative thinking, but is always
aware of the real world and what is reasonable.
 Strategically avoids making others feel like winners and
losers.
Notes – Leadership Styles
The Answer is in the “Blending”
Combines two or more Leadership Styles.
Best Leadership Style: A Blend of the Artist
and the Craftsman.
A Leadership Style that combines creativity and
genuine enthusiasm with levelheadedness,
compassion, and collaboration.
What do you think is the best
Leadership Styles?
Examples?
Best and worst leaders?
What are you?
Leadership Quiz
 Write the response that reflects your first reaction. There is no right
or wrong answer.
 As a leader, I tend to…
 Always (4) Often (3) Sometimes (2) Never (1)
 1. Make my own decisions
4 3 2 1
 2. Tell others what to do
4 3 2 1
 3. Suggest a decision to others
4 3 2 1
Leadership Quiz
Always (4) Often (3) Sometimes (2) Never (1)
4. Persuade others to do things my way
4 3 2 1
5. Participate just like any other person
4 3 2 1
6. Provide resources to others
4 3 2 1
Leadership Quiz
Always (4) Often (3) Sometimes (2) Never (1)
7. Gather others feedback before deciding
4 3 2 1
8. Rely on my own judgment
4 3 2 1
9. Make sure the majority rules
4 3 2 1
Leadership Quiz
Always (4) Often (3) Sometimes (2) Never (1)
10. Turn decision over to others
4 3 2 1
11. Ask others to brainstorm choices
4 3 2 1
12. Share my own ideas
4 3 2 1
Results
 Add the numbers together from the following set of
questions. The highest number will show what
leadership style that seems natural for you. You should
strive to understand different leadership styles and think of
ways you might use them for different situations.
 Add the numbers you circled for the following questions.
 Question 1, 2, 4, 8 ________ Autocratic
 Question 3, 7, 9, 11 _______ Participatory
 Question 5, 6, 10, 12 ______ Free Rein
Results Cont.
Autocratic: This leadership style is more direct
and controlling. People tend to be more
orientated towards productivity and goals. Their
strength is to get thing done and make quick
decisions. Autocratic leaders take authority and
go headfirst in solving problems. They like
freedom to manage themselves and others.
They tend to measure their success by the items
of task/activities they get done.
Results Cont.
Participatory: This leadership style requires input
from others. People tend to be more concerned
about the process of how the decisions are made
and that everyone has a voice. Participatory
leaders tend to make decisions in a slow,
thoughtful process. Generally, these people are
good listeners and cooperative.
Results Cont.
Free Rein: This leadership style is more relaxed
and supportive. People who are free rein tend to
be your regular old Joe. Details are not much of a
concern, because things will get done. They are
comfortable with teamwork and group activities.
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 1: A Leader Has a Sense of Vision
 Vision: (in application to Leadership) The ability to see
more than just the obvious.
 Leaders with a sense of vision can often “solve the
puzzle” because they have the ability to see the scope
of a situation in its entirety and then focus on what
really matters.
 To truly develop a sense of vision, a leader must have
insight, look at the long-term perspective, and ponder
the “big picture.”
 Specific Communication Strategy: Practice creative
thinking skills, but also seek out the ideas of others so
that you can truly grasp the “big picture.”
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 2: A Leader is Willing to Act
 Leaders are doers.
 Take action. Believe in getting the job done and getting it
done well.
 “Quit thinking and talking about success and start acting.”
-Sinclair Lewis
 Specific Communication Strategy: When leadership is
needed, take charge! Make statements such as these:
“Here’s what we need to do now.” “Let’s now make a
specific list of who’s responsible for what.”
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 3: A Leader Makes Good Decisions
 Nothing will kill the credibility of a leader more quickly
than to be perceived by others as indecisive when the
time comes for decision making.
 Decisions should show intelligence, reflect ethical
communication, and show that you feel a sense of
social professional responsibility for those who are your
followers.
Questions to ask yourself…
1) Am I knowledgeable about the issues and
the people involved?
Knowing as much as possible about the
history of a subject or person can help with
insight to the views of the situation.
Questions to ask yourself…
2) Am I making decisions in the correct
order?
Which comes first, the chicken or the
egg?
A good leader decides on larger issues
first and then moves down the list,
realistically considering needs versus
wants before prioritizing.
Questions to ask yourself…
3) Am I aware of the risks involved?
A good leader should be informed and
able to prioritize. He or she must also be
willing to consider taking a chance
sometimes if the situation is right.
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 4: A Leader Can Handle Conflict
 Conflict Management: The ability to turn a potentially negative
situation into a good one.
 Four Step Plan
 1) Shut Up! A good leader doesn’t always have to be the one doing
the talking.
 2) Look Up! Establish eye contact with the person.
 3) Hook Up! It is important to “hook up” emotionally with the other
person to try to understand his or her point of view.
 4) Chill Down! When you do verbally respond to the other person,
make your comments rational, sensitive, and constructive.
 Specific Communication Strategy: In a tactful manner, summarize
for others what they have said to you so that they know that you
were paying attention to them.
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 5: A Leader Works to Avoid Pitfalls
 Being conscious of a potential problem ahead of time might help you
“cut it off at the pass” – stop it before it gets started.
 Pitfall 1: Being Afraid to Fail…
 A leader should not always play it safe.
 Pitfall 2: Not Paying Attention to Details…
 Of course, a good leader should focus on the “big picture.” But he
or she should also pay attention to the small things.
 Pitfall 3: Forgetting People and the Original Objectives…
 Don’t leave those behind who’ve put in the work from the
beginning and don’t lose sight of what the main objective
originally was.
 Pitfall 4: Not listening to Others…
 Seeing others’ views enables leaders to have a better
understanding of a situation.
The Planks of Leadership
 Plank 6: A Leader Knows How to Motivate
 Motivation: to inspire others, yourself, or both.
 Motivation is personal.
 The job of a good leader is to know his or her group
well enough to know what will work with whom…
different strokes for different folks.
 Specific Communication Strategy: Read the advice
given for Planks 1-5 and work on making both your
verbal and non-verbal communication clear and
meaningful.
Notes - Learning Styles
Learning Style 1: Discussion
Learn best through meaningful discussion
Want to be actively involved in the oral
communication process, lots of dialogue, and
feedback.
Appreciate face-to-face communication.
Love to brainstorm and throw many ideas out
onto the table.
Notes – Learning Styles
Learning Style 2: Logic
Learn best when things are presented
logically.
“Just the Facts” approach.
Logic stresses analysis, organization, and an
approach to focusing on “good sense.”
Not impressed by a lot of talk, genuinely
interested when they hear a direct, logical, tothe-point plan of action.
Notes – Learning Styles
Learning Style 3: Design
Learn best when they can see and hear how
the “big picture” fits together.
Includes engineers, builders, and designers.
Encouraged when the leader presents a clear
picture of relationships and shows how the
different parts are all going to work together as
a smooth-running unit.
Notes – Learning Styles
Learning Style 4: Emotion
Learn best with communication and a handson approach when the leader is energetic and
fired up.
A leader who shows the group that he or she
is emotionally involved with a specific project
or idea will quickly attract highly involved and
committed followers.
Follow the Leader Activity

similar documents