Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS)

Report
Few
Some
All
Multi-Tiered System of Supports
A Comprehensive Framework for
Implementing the
California Common Core State Standards
Professional Learning Module Series
d
• Unit 1: What is a Multi-Tiered System of
Supports?
• Unit 2: Data-based Decision Making
• Unit 3: Instructional Planning and Supports
• Unit 4: Leadership for Implementation of
MTSS
Available on the
Brokers of Expertise Website
www.myboe.org
Welcome Message
f
Phil LaFontaine, Director
Professional Learning Support Division
Instructional and Learning Support Branch
Fred Balcom, Director
Special Education Division
Student Support and Special Services Branch
Tom Adams, Director
Curriculum Frameworks & Instructional Resources
Division
Karen Cadiero-Kaplan, Director
English Learner Support Division
Instructional and Learning Support Branch
California Department of Education (CDE)
Pre-Assessment
• Locate the Pre-Assessment handout
• Assess your knowledge of MTSS
• Complete independently
• Share your responses
Learning Objectives
By the end of this unit, you will be able to:n
1. Recognize the structure of MTSS as a
framework for implementation of the CA CCSS
2. State the rationale for MTSS framework within
the context of the CA CCSS
3. Describe the core components of MTSS
4. Define the difference between MTSS and RtI2
5. Identify critical components of the
implementation process
A Rationale for the CA CCSS
“The CCSS addresses the deep challenges of
inequality of opportunity between
different students exposed to radically
unequal opportunities when it comes to
the material they study and the quality of
instruction they have received.”
(Coleman, D. 2011)
Implementing
the CA CCSS
MTSS
Through MTSS
• Embrace and address the diverse needs of
ALL students
• Develop and implement high-quality
curricula aligned with initiatives, resources
and supports
• Some students will need additional
support and interventions
Implementing the CA CCSS
Through MTSS
“. . . Implementing the Common Core State
Standards within a framework of a MultiTiered System of Support will help ensure
that all students have an evidence-based
system of instruction to assist them in
achieving success.”
(Gamm, Elliott, Halbert, et. al., 2012)
Time to Reflect
• Think about the supports and
interventions currently in place in your
school or district
• Which student populations are addressed?
California Systems of Support
• Interventions within • Services for English
Learners, American
the RtI2 framework
Indian students,
• Special Education
and those in gifted
and talented
• Title I
programs
• Title III
Are these systems consistent with the supports
you identified as available in your school or district?
The Shift to the CA CCSS
VIDEO – Why Common Core?
http://vimeo.com/30055181
(NYC Department of Education)
Time to Reflect
• What do these standards demand from
students?
• How do they change the curriculum?
• How do they change the instruction?
Characteristics of the CA CCSS
Clear &
consistent
framework
Schools are
globally
competitive
Logical
Progression of
rigorous
content
Balanced application
of math & literacy
Reflect the
principles of
Universal Design
for Learning
Evidence-based
practices
Produce the deep
knowledge
& skills necessary
For
ALL
students
CA CCSS for
English/Language Arts, & Literacy
1. A comprehensive Kindergarten–5th grade
section, including standards for
foundational skills
2. Content-specific sections for grades 6–12
for English / Language Arts
3. Content-specific sections for grades 6–12
for literacy in History / Social Studies,
Science and Technical subjects.
Shifts in ELA & Literacy
1. Reaching a true balance of informational &
literary text
2. Building knowledge of content areas
through text
3. Creating staircase of text complexity
4. Providing text-based answers
5. Providing sources and evidence to support
arguments
6. Learning of academic language
Math Standards
Mathematical Practice
• Describe how standards should be
approached in instruction
Mathematical Content
• Define what students should know and be
able to do
• Organized by domains in Kindergarten
through 8th grade
• Organized by conceptual categories in high
school
The Three Shifts
in Mathematics
• Focus
– Moved from solving problems in a precise way,
to being able to solve them using a variety of
strategies
• Coherence
– Ensure that the learning is carefully connected
• Rigor
– Reflected in a strong emphasis on fluency at
the primary grades
(Cocuzza)
Time to Reflect
Review the pedagogical shifts
– Identify two major shifts in ELA/Literacy
instruction
– Identify one major shift in math
instruction
– What changes in your system will be
necessary to support these shifts?
Analysis of Real Data
CA Achievement Gaps
in English / Language Arts
100
90
80
Non-Disabled
70
Percent
Proficient 60
And
Above 50
40
59
English Only
49
46
44
38
English Language
Learners
28
30
20
20
10
Students with
Disabilities
64
9
Not Economically
Disadvantaged
25
Economically
Disadvantaged
10
4
0
2003
2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
CA Achievement Gaps
in English / Language Arts
100
90
80
Non-Disabled
70
Percent
Proficient 60
And
Above 50
40
59
English Only
49
46
44
38
English Language
Learners
28
30
20
20
10
Students with
Disabilities
64
9
Not Economically
Disadvantaged
25
Economically
Disadvantaged
10
4
0
2003
2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
CA Achievement Gaps
in Mathematics
100
90
80
Non-Disabled
70
64
Percent
Proficient 60
And
Above 50
40
English Only
45
43
39
37
30
20
55
53
37
Students With
Disabilities
20
24
29
Not Economically
Disadvantaged
Economically
Disadvantaged
13
10
0
2003
English Language
Learners
2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
CA Achievement Gaps
in Mathematics
100
90
80
Non-Disabled
70
64
Percent
Proficient 60
And
Above 50
40
English Only
45
43
39
37
30
20
55
53
37
Students With
Disabilities
20
24
29
Not Economically
Disadvantaged
Economically
Disadvantaged
13
10
0
2003
English Language
Learners
2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
Time to Reflect
• What trends do you see for all student
populations when you analyze this data?
• Have the achievement gaps for any
subgroups closed significantly in the last
nine years?
• What do you attribute to the persistence
of those gaps?
• Suggest a solution
CA Graduation Rate
100
90
80
78.5
76.3
70
Percent
Graduated
60
70
70
59.1
60.3
61.6
60.8
GE All
Students With
Disabilities
English Language
Learners
Economically
Disadvantaged
50
40
30
20
10
0
2011
2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
CA Drop Out Rate
100
90
80
70
GE All
Percent 60
Dropped
Out 50
40
29.8
30
20
23.7
17.5
21.3
14.4
24.9
17.7
18.4
10
0
2009-2010
2011-2012
(California Department of Education DataQuest files: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/)
Students With
Disabilities
English Language
Learners
Economically
Disadvantaged
Time to Reflect
Reflect on the data on graduation and drop
out rates
• What do you believe this data suggests
about current approaches to instruction
and intervention?
• What significant changes are necessary to
improve outcomes for ALL students?
The Rationale for Change
“A full 70 percent of US middle and high
school students require differentiated
instruction, which is instruction targeted to
their individual strengths and weaknesses.”
The one-size-fits-all approach
will no longer work
if we are expecting a different result
(Biancarosa & Snow, 2004)
What MTSS Offers
• The potential to create the needed
systematic change
• Focus on
– The CCSS
– Core instruction with UDL Principles applied
– Differentiated learning
– Student-centered learning
– Individualized student needs
– Alignment of the systems necessary for
academic, behavior, and social success
(Averill & Rinaldi, 2011)
Integration of MTSS & the CA CCSS
“MTSS builds on the CCSS to provide a
framework and a set of critical tools and
additional time to support teaching and
learning at differing levels of intensity,
depending on the academic needs of the
students. In other words, the CCSS
articulates the “what” in teaching; and
MTSS provides a framework for “how” and
“when” to provide it.”
(Gamm, Elliott, Halbert, et. al., 2012)
Are we just
changing the name from
Response to
Instruction and Intervention to
Multi-Tiered System of Supports?
The RtI2 Framework
Intensive – Tier III
≈ 5%
Strategic- Tier II
≈ 15%
Benchmark - Tier I
≈ 80%
of Students
The RtI2 Framework
Intensive – Tier III
≈ 5%
Strategic- Tier II
≈ 5%
≈ 15%
Benchmark - Tier I
Students receive highquality core and universal
instruction aligned to the
Common Core,
differentiated to meet
the needs of ALL
students in every
classroom.
≈ 80% of Students
≈ 80% of Students
The RtI2 Framework
Intensive – Tier III
≈ 5%
Strategic- Tier II
For students who did not progress
or respond to Tier I efforts as
expected, and require additional
evidence-based strategic and
targeted instruction and
supports.
≈ 15%
Benchmark - Tier I
≈ 80%
of Students
The RtI2 Framework
Intensive – Tier III
≈ 5%
Strategic- Tier II
≈ 15%
Students receive targeted
intervention designed to increase
the rate of progress. These
students have been through both
Tier 1 and Tier 2 instruction and
supports, but showed minimal
response.
*NOT Special Education
Benchmark - Tier I
≈ 80%
of Students
RtI2 Limitations
• Does not include all students
• Focus often is only on academics
• Without a system-wide approach, RtI2
is not aligned with other initiatives,
resources, or supports
(Meinders 2012)
MTSS Paradigm Shifts
FROM…
TO…
Intervention
for a FEW
students
Prevention for
ALL students
Identifying which
student needs
help
Identifying what
help each student
needs
Using the programs
and people available
Intentional design and
redesign of services and
supports matched to
needs of students
MTSS Principles and Practices
• Early Intervention
• Multi-tiered model
• Evidence-based
supports and
practices
• Fluidly driven by
data
• Individualized
interventions
• Principles of UDL
(www.kansasmtss.org)
• Differentiated learning
• Integration of
intervention and
instructional supports
• Classroom instruction
aligned with the CA
CCSS
• Strong, predictable, and
consistent classroom
management structures
Time to Reflect
Read Kansas Multi-Tier Systems of Support:
The Integration of MTSS and RtI
• Identify the attributes of most RtI models
• Add the attributes of MTSS
• Where do these models overlap?
(www.kansasmtss.org)
Essential Concepts
CA MTSS
RtI2
• Universal screening
• Multiple tiers of
intervention
• Data-driven decision
making
• Problem solving
teams
• Focus on CCSS
• Addresses the needs of
ALL Students
• Aligns the entire system of
initiatives, supports, and resources
• Implements continuous
improvement processes at
all levels of the system
Bringing MTSS to CA Schools
The implementation of MTSS will
“require all school staff
to change the way
in which they have
traditionally worked”
across all school settings
(Castillo et. al. 2010)
Bringing MTSS to CA Schools
• School teams must focus on
– Facilitation of consensus building
– Establishment of necessary
infrastructure
– Ongoing evaluation of adhering to
implementation
(Castillo et. al. 2010)
Implementing MTSS
“Real change is possible,
but only by taking
a truly systemic approach.
There are not quick fixes.”
(Fullan, 2010)
Stages of Implementation
Should
we do
it?
Work to
do it
right!
Work to
improve
it!
1. Exploration
2. Installation
3. Initial Implementation
4. Full Implementation
5. Improvement and Innovation
Stages of Implementation
Should
we do
it?
1. Exploration
• Making decisions regarding commitment to
adopting the program and practices
• Supporting successful implementation
• Selection of a representative
implementation team to
– Establish vision and goals
– Identify the scale of needs
– Anticipate allocation of resources
– Create a professional development plan
Stages of Implementation
Work
to do it
right!
2. Installation
• Set up infrastructure
• Establish leadership teams and data
systems
• Conduct an audit
• Develop a plan
• Implement professional development plan
Stages of Implementation
Work
to do it
right!
•
•
•
•
3. Initial Implementation
Try out the practices
Work out details
Learn and improve
Ongoing collection and analysis of progress
data to
– Determine the benefits to students
– Refine supports, systems, and policies
• Analyze performance evaluation data to
provide ongoing coaching and teacher supports
Stages of Implementation
Work to
improve
it!
4. Full Implementation
• All MTSS elements are in place
• Ongoing communication to staff members
and the community
• Performance data is continuously analyzed
• Ongoing training and coaching is provided
• Expand the program and practices to other
locations, individuals, and times
Stages of Implementation
Work to
improve
it!
5. Improvement and Innovation
• Increase the efficient use of resources
• Improve outcomes for students
• Success requires that staff members
continually analyze data
Unit 1
Take Away Activity
Read Multi-Tier System of Support (MTSS)
By: Orla Higgins Averill, Claudia Rinaldi, Urban
Special Education Leadership Collaborative
• Note the features of RtI, PBIS, and MTSS
• What steps are necessary to bring MTSS to
scale?
Time to Reflect
• What did you learn in Unit 1?
• What questions do you have?
Unit 2 Preview
• Data-based decision making
– Why is data so important in MTSS?
– What type of data is most useful?
– Where can we find resources regarding
data?

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