File - Formative Assessment and Differentiated Instruction

Report
Not Your Mother’s Projects
st
21
The
Century Context
for CCSS - Focused
Project Based Learning
So you don’t have to take notes,
you will find this PowerPoint at…
www.formativedifferentiated.com
-Jacque Melin’s Website
Sources used to create this
PowerPoint:
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www.bie.org
http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/pbl.html
http://www.pblu.org/classes
http://www.smarterbalanced.org/news/smarterbalanced-releases-sample-assessment-items-andperformance-tasks/
Your Driving Question…
How can we, as teachers,
design and implement
effective PBL (units) that are
aligned to the Common Core?
What do you need to know…
The What and the How
= the WHAT
= the HOW
Does NOT Solve Problems of
Engagement
What is Project Based Learning?

PBL is a systematic teaching method that
engages students in learning important
knowledge and 21st century skills through an
extended, student-influenced inquiry
process structured around complex,
authentic questions and carefully designed
products and learning tasks.
A Project could be….

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An exploration of a philosophical question – “What is
a healthy community?”
An investigation of a historical event or a natural
phenomenon.
A problem-solving situation – either real or fictitious.
An in-depth examination of a controversial issue.
A challenge to design an artifact, plan or event.
A challenge to create a piece of writing, multimedia or
work of art for a particular audience or purpose.
PBL Essential Elements
Publicly
Presented
Product
Driving
Question
or
Challenge
Need
to
Know
Feedback
&
Revision
Inquiry
&
Innovation
Student
Voice &
Choice
21st Century
Skills
Driving Question
or
Challenge
Inquiry
&
Innovation
Need
to
Know
Student
Voice &
Choice
Critique
&
Revision
Public
Performance
& Product
21st Century
Skills
PBL Essential Elements
Publicly
Presented
Product
Driving
Question
or
Challenge
Need
to
Know
Feedback
&
Revision
Inquiry
&
Innovation
Student
Voice &
Choice
21st Century
Skills
PBL is the
MAIN COURSE NOT the DESSERT
Your Mother’s Projects
Dessert Project
Students bring dishes
from various countries
for a “Food of the
World” day, dressing in
clothes that represent
the culture.
Main Course PBL
Students answer the
questions, “Are we the
same as or different from
the people in China?” as
they create narrated
videos, based on
information from fiction
and nonfiction, movies,
and documentaries, and
correspondence with pen
pals (ePals) at a school in
China.
Dessert Project
During a unit on plants,
students grow beans,
radishes, carrots, and
other plants in containers
in the classroom,
observing their growth
and recording data.
Main Course PBL
Students plan and
install a vegetable
garden, deciding what
will grow well in their
climate and what soil,
water, and other
materials they will
need.
Dessert Project
Students cut various
shapes out of different
colors of paper, then
label and make mobiles
with them.
Main Course PBL
Students work with the
cafeteria staff to
improve the flow of
students getting their
lunches. They gather
and record numerical
data and use it to
present their
recommendations.
Dessert Project
Students write creative
stories about animals
and collect them into a
book, which they
illustrate and publish,
giving a copy to each
family in the class.
Main Course PBL
Students write on a
class blog, drawing
from various readings
as well as interviews
with each other, to
express their answers
to the question, “What
is it like to be 9 years
old?”
www.bie.org
Those who criticize PBL…
“It’s not focused enough
on content.”
– They
“I can’t use traditional teaching tools!”
– They
“I can’t cover enough material.”
– They
“It’s loud & messy!”
– They
“There’s no individual
accountability.”
– They
“I don’t have time and support.”
– They
“My students aren’t ready.”
– They
PBL Essential Elements
Publicly
Presented
Product
Driving
Question
or
Challenge
Need
to
Know
Feedback
&
Revision
Inquiry
&
Innovation
Student
Voice &
Choice
21st Century
Skills
Backward Design Process
Begin with the End in Mind
Decide the scope of the project
2. Select standards
3. Develop a project idea
4. Decide on culminating projects or
presentations.
 Craft the Driving Question
1.
LIMITED
AMBITIOUS
Duration
10-15 contact hours
40+ contact hours
Breadth
One subject;
few standards
Interdisciplinary;
several standards
Basic
Extensive
Classroom
Community/World
One teacher
Several teachers, outside
experts, community
Classroom
Experts, community,
world, web
Teacher-defined;
tightly managed
Co-defined and managed
Technology
Setting
Who’s Involved
Audience
Student Autonomy
Backward Design Process
Begin with the End in Mind
Decide the scope of the project
2. Select standards
3. Develop a project idea
4. Decide on culminating projects or
presentations & rubrics
 Craft the Driving Question
1.
Select Standards
What do you want your students to know and be able
to do?

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Identify the key standards that you believe might best be met
through project based instruction.
No more than 3 standards per subject is best in shorter projects.
Adjust accordingly for interdisciplinary or longer-term projects.
Include at least one literacy outcome in your project.
Be clear about the standards that will be assessed and how the products
will allow each student to demonstrate their learning.
From the ELA CCSS….
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“Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects
based on focused questions …”
“Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners …”
“Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and
publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others
…”
“Conduct short research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) …”
Released item from Smarter Balanced…
4th Grade Performance Task
http://sampleitems.smarterbalanced.org/itempreview/sbac/ELA.htm
SOURCES OF INSPIRATION
FOR PROJECTS
o Your Content Standards
o Your Students
o Current Events
o Real-World Practice/Problem
o Your File Cabinet
o Your Colleagues
o Your Community
o Online Project Libraries
North Kent Transfer Station
80 Acre Sports Complex
Vacant lot where tannery once stood
North Kent Community Services
Rockford Historical Museum
Are there enough enrichment (other than sports) and/or
volunteer opportunities available for children in Rockford?
www.bie.org
http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/pbl.html
THINK
SHARE
YOUR IDEAS. Would PBL be an evolution of your teaching, or
a revolution? Or do you do it already? Could you modify
some of your current activities or “projects” so they have the
8 essential features of PBL? What are your ideas for projects?
st
21
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Century Skills
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
Creativity & Innovation
Collaboration, Teamwork & Leadership
Cross-cultural Understanding
Communication & Media Literacy
Computing and ITC Technology
Career & Learning Self-direction
st
21
Century Skills
explicitly taught and
assessed or encouraged by
project work, but not taught
or assessed:
ELA PBL Project Idea
Healthy Choices = Long Life

Students will develop a product that informs
others of the dangers associated with poor
nutrition and poor fitness habits as well as the
lifestyle changes that can combat it.
Math PBL Project Idea
From Our Class to Yours
New name and website:
http://www.e-luminate.org/
Students will explore fractions and create
books to be used by students in a school in
Uganda. This is part of the Books of Hope
project which specifically asks for books
on non-fiction topics that can be used to
teach both English and the content
involved. The project links learning of
content with writing skills and global
studies.
Science PBL Project Idea
Spiders, Good Guys or Bad?
Children often do not like spiders because they think they look scary. This project
will help children appreciate the place spiders have in the world and will lessen
their fears of spiders caused by misunderstandings. Through interactive read
alouds and interactive whiteboard lessons, kindergarten students will learn that
spiders are good guys because they help keep the insect population in check.
Students will observe spiders in a “close to natural state” while making a
classroom vivarium. Students will create a commercial using a flip camera to
teach the other kindergarten students in our school that spiders can be good
guys.
Science PBL Project Idea
Harrowing Habitats
Michigan is a state rich with wildlife and
beautiful scenery. Students will explore various
global ecosystems to see if animals are safe
and protected in their natural habitats. Then
they will apply their findings to Michigan and
determine any possible threats to our local
wildlife. Students will then develop solutions to
possible problems. Through multimedia
experiences they will then relate their findings
to a panel of experts.
Social Studies PBL Project Idea
Amazing Race: US Regions
As a class, the students will create an Amazing Race challenge for another class. Students are
put into production groups to create a show segment for The Amazing Race.
Each group will
• represent the different United States regions.
• investigate the various types of geographical regions (e.g., political regions, economic
regions, landform regions, vegetation regions)
• create a digital poster or poster board presentation to be posted on classroom wiki for study
reference
• include an “ artifact ” (e.g. geographic tools/ technologies, stories, songs, and pictures) to
further describe their specific region.
As a class, students will present their final product and regional artifacts to another class as an
Amazing Race challenge. Ultimately, the students will reflect on what they learned and write
about how do other regions in the United States influence their lives?
A good Driving Question meets the
following criteria:
1. Engaging for Students
2. Open-ended
3. Aligned with Learning Targets
From “too big” to answerable:
How have humans changed the environment?
How has the environment in our (state, city,
etc.) changed in the past 50 years?
From “Google-able” to open-ended:
Which trees grow in our community?
How can we create a field guide to trees in our community?
From too general to more concrete and challenging:
Which stories and books are the most popular for
people of our age?
How can we create a website that recommends
books for young people in our community?
From too abstract to more relevant and engaging:
What is a hero?
Who are the heroes in our community and how
can we tell their story?
From too general to more concrete and localized:
What are the characteristics of healthy soil?
Is our soil healthy enough to support a vegetable garden?
From “sounds like a teacher” to student-friendly:
How does the author use voice and perspective in
The House on Mango Street to reflect on her
childhood and community?
How does our childhood shape who we are
as teenagers?
Another way to write a DQ…
Ask yourself, “Who
in the real world
does this work?”
Ask yourself, “What
products are created
or actions taken by
people in this role?”
How can we, as ______ (role), _______ (do a
task/create a product) for/to/that_________ (purpose
& audience)?
Ask yourself, “What is the purpose
of the product or action – to
persuade, inform, propose a
solution, be used, etc. – and who is
the audience?”
How can we, as newspaper reporters, write an article that explains which buildings
in our community be protected as “historic?”
“Yes, the Cold War!”
– No One
EXAMPLE ENTRY EVENTS
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Field Trip
Guest Speaker
Film, Video, Website
Simulation or Activity
Provocative Reading
Startling Statistics
Puzzling Problem
Piece of Real or Mock
Correspondence
o Song, Poem, Art
o Lively Discussion
ELA PBL Driving Question and Entry
Event
Healthy Choices = Long Life
Driving Question: Why is it important to establish habits
that promote a healthy lifestyle?
Math PBL Driving Question and Entry
Event
From Our Class to Yours
Driving Question: How can we share what we know about
fractions with a school in Uganda?
Science PBL Driving Question and
Entry Event
Spiders, Good Guys or Bad?
Driving Question: Should you kill a spider?
Science PBL Driving Question
and Entry Event
Harrowing Habitats
Driving Question: How can we work to
protect the animals that inhabit Michigan?
Social Studies PBL Driving Question
and Entry Event
Amazing Race: US Regions
Driving Question: How do other regions in
the United States influence my life?
One Entry Event might
not do it.
http://www.awesomestories.com/
TO DOs:
 Select Appropriate Standards
 Generate a Project Idea
 Refine a Driving Question
 Determine Culminating Products
 Create an Entry Event*
Avoid death by repetitive presentations
Differentiation 
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
Presentations will differ if you have an
open-ended DQ or a problem with
several possible solutions
Presentations will differ if students have a
choice of products / ways to present
answer to DQ
Examples of Authentic Products
Real-World Role
Real-World Product
Architect or Contractor
Plan, drawing, model
Business Person
Business plan, proposal, annual report, written or oral report
City Planner
Plan, proposal
Consultant
Written or oral presentation
Doctor or health care worker
Written or oral presentation, informational brochure, webpage
Engineer
Plan, drawing, model
Lawyer, judge
Mock trial, brief
Museum curator
Exhibit
Teacher
Lesson Plan
Written
Media
Presentation
Training
Products
Construction
Products
Tech
Products
Research Report
Podcast
Speech
Program
Physical Model
Computer Database
Narrative Essay
Graphic Novel
Debate
Manual
Machine
Website
Proposal
Slide Show
Play
Model
Scientific Instrument
Brief
Oral History
Song
Proposal
Museum Exhibit
Poem
Drawing
Lyrics
Estimate
Diorama
Poster
Blog
Musical Piece
Bid
Movie Script
Oral Report
Blueprint
Outline
Dramatic
Reenactment
Flow Chart
Brochure
Panel Discussion
Time-line
Survey
Newscast
Questionnaire
Skit
Autobiography
Discussion
Essay
Dance
Book Review
Proposal
Report
Data Display
Editorial
Product Exhibition
App
“I CAN use traditional teaching tools!”
– You
Key Points to Remember about Rubrics in PBL


Each major product or presentation will need its
own rubric.
Rubrics are not the same as checklists
 Checklists
= assess completion
 Rubrics = assess quality
KITTY KARRIER PROJECT REQUIREMENTS
☐ Low Cost Materials
☐ No Metal Parts
☐ Fit Underneath Seat on Plane
☐ Open & Close Access
☐ Comfortable & Breathable
☐ Rigid Structure
KITTY KARRIER PROJECT REQUIREMENTS
☐ Low Cost Materials
☐ No Metal Parts
☐ Fit Underneath Seat on Plane
☐ Open & Close Access
☐ Comfortable & Breathable
☐ Rigid Structure
Key Points to Remember about Rubrics in PBL


Each major product or performance will need its
own rubric.
Rubrics are not the same as checklists
 Checklists
= assess completion
 Rubrics = assess quality

Assess content knowledge/skills separately from
21st century skills
Key Points to Remember about Rubrics in PBL


Each major product or performance will need its
own rubric.
Rubrics are not the same as checklists
 Checklists
= assessing completion
 Rubrics = assessing quality



Assess content knowledge/skills separately from
21st century skills
Use student friendly language and show rubrics to
students early to help guide their work
Use rubrics as formative assessment tools.
SELF
PEER
Rules for the
CULTURE OF CRITIQUE
 Be kind.
 Be specific.
 Be helpful.
Continuum of Assessment
Daily
Homework
Weekly
Quiz
Lab
Informal assessment
Mid-project milestone
Essay
Mini-Presentation
Model
Storyboard
Blueprint
Early milestone
Journal
Self-reflection
Preliminary plans
Group process report
End of project
Exhibition
Completed artifact
Oral presentation
Defense before a panel
Unit Test
Public Audience – Why?

Present work to other people, beyond their classmates
and teacher

in person or online

“Ups the stakes”
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Increases students’ motivation to do high-quality work

Adds to the authenticity of the project.
TO DOs & Final Tips:
 Write Project Overview for Students
 List Criteria for Major Products
and Write Rubrics
 Plan Day-to-Day Activities and/or
Develop Project Calendar
 Gather Content Resources
What to record on the Project Calendar
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Entry Event
Daily teaching and learning tasks
Checkpoints
Practice Presentations
Presentation Schedule
Dates for Project Completion
Tests or other summative assessments (if applicable)
Time for reflection and celebration
http://mpcavazos.glogster.com/
TEAMING TIPS
o Teacher decides teams
(or manages the process)
o Four is best
o Usually heterogeneous
o “Slacker hardball”
Re-teach teamwork
every time they do it.
For Planning….
Use the FreeBIE Material
from the Buck Institute
www.bie.org
THINK
SHARE
WHAT ARE YOUR SHORT TERM AND LONG TERM GOALS.
How will what you learned today about PBL change your
curriculum, instruction and/or assessment practices as you
plan for implementing the CCSS?
Please contact me if I can help:
Cell: 616-450-0998 or Email: [email protected]

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