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Report
PAVING THE WAY:
Making the Most of Market Realities
Presentation to the Board of Directors
September 23, 2008
Overview
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Section I – Branding Backgrounder
 Types of communications campaigns
 Messaging
 Review of relevant campaigns
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Section II – NRMCA Focus
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 Market realities
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 Goals
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 Audiences
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 Messages
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 Strategy
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Tactics
Scope
Resources
Measuring success
Timeline
Ad mock-up
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Section I
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Strategic Communications Campaigns
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Education and awareness
Corporate reputation
Issues management
Marcom
Industry branding
Advertising can support any and all of these
types of campaigns
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I’m a great paver.
Trust us. He’s a
great paver.
Marketing
Public relations
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I’m a great paver.
I’m a great paver.
I’m a great paver.
We understand you’re
a great paver.
Advertising
Branding
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Brand equity
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Approaching Campaign Messages
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Building the foundation
Developing the messages
Testing and refining
Deploying the messages
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Building a Message House
There are a few easy, low-cost steps you can take that will
help you be ready in the face of any emergency situation.
Sit down with your family and make an emergency
preparedness plan. In your home, have three days of food
and three gallons of water per person, a battery powered
radio, a flashlight and a first aid kit
It is simple to do and important to start now.
Knowing what to do in
the first 15 minutes of an
emergency is essential
to your safety and the
safety of your loved ones.
Many lives have been
saved each year because
people took the time to
become prepared.
Whether it’s having
stored food and water,
planning a fire escape
route or learning CPR,
preparation makes the
difference.
People with special needs, and those who
have loved ones with special needs,
should include those considerations in
their emergency and preparedness
planning. It is important to remember that
the usual methods of support and
assistance may not be available during an
emergency and after the disaster has
occurred.
Being prepared for an
emergency involves
learning as much as you
can and making plans to
act. The NCR
Campaign’s suggestions
are a good start.
Continue to educate
yourself and become
even more prepared.
Emergency planning should include all
members of the family, including pets.
Pets depend on you for food, water and
safety. Without proper planning, your pets
may be forgotten in an emergency.
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Finding Your Tagline
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Industry case studies
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Inside-the-Beltway
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Consumer/Check-off
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The New Steel
Got Milk?
Targeted
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Risk is Opportunity.
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The New Steel
American Iron &
Steel Institute
(AISI)
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Steel Tries To Shed Its Smokestack Image
June 27, 2006
ASK random Americans their opinion of the steel industry, and
you'll probably hear about smoke-belching plants, sweaty laborers,
rampant bankruptcies and sniveling whiners trying to get the
government to protect their companies.
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Market Realities
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Steel industry reeling from dumping
Perception of steel as old and dirty among
political elites
Mittal Steel and Arcelor merger top of mind
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AISI Campaign Elements
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U.S. Steelmakers Polish Their Image
May 25, 2008
Goal: Change
perceptions of steel
industry from old and
dirty to modern and
high tech
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AISI Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Strategy:
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Focus on a platform of global
competitiveness
Emphasize that America’s steel
industry is the backbone of U.S.
manufacturing
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Show commitment to reducing
environmental footprint
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Demonstrate that steel industry is
vital to America’s economic and
national security
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AISI Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Audiences: Political elites
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Resources: $3 million
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Inside the beltway
Print, radio and online ads = $2.78 million
Timeline: June 2006 to early-to-mid 2008
Tactics: Print, radio, online ads; member
activation; media relations
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AISI Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Spotlight on Tactics: Member Outreach
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Create executive task force for feedback
Use companies’ HQs as conduits for information
Provide members with poster-sized versions of the ads
suitable for framing
Develop and distribute the “Backbone Kit” for meetings
with policymakers on Capitol Hill
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AISI Campaign Results
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Winner
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Silver David Ogilvy Award for research
Silver Communicator Awards
AISI measures the success of the campaign via:
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Media and online coverage
Outreach to Capitol Hill
Benchmarking (March and September 2006
and April and October 2007)
Buzz among target audiences
Introduction and passage of legislation
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California Milk
Processor Board/
The Milk Processor
Education Program
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Market Realities
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30-year declining trend in milk consumption
Declining market share
“Milk Does a Body Good” was not working
What could you say about milk?
It was white and came in gallons.
People felt they knew all there was to
know about it, so it was hard to find a
strategic platform.
- Jeff Manning, CMPB Executive Director
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Milk Campaign Elements
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Goal: Increase consumption of milk
Strategy:
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Shift from focusing on nutritional benefits of
milk to a “food-beverage” connection
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Milk and cookies; PBJ and milk
Play up disappointment when milk is
unavailable
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Milk Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Audiences: Consumers
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Resources:
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California: Check-off campaign - $23 million/year
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Financed by contributing three cents for every
gallon of milk processed
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National: Check-off campaign - unavailable
Timeline:
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Ongoing. Began in 1993 in CA and went national
in 1998.
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First “mustache” ad aired in 1995
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Milk Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Tactics:
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Print, radio and TV ads
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Online ads during national campaign
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Co-branding
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Media buys timed to key dining hours (during dinner and late-night)
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Billboards along commuter routes
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Point-of-sale decals
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Later ads poked fun at ubiquity of campaign
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Minority-targeted ads
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Milk Ads, Web site & Collateral
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Milk Campaign Results
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90% awareness of tagline in the U.S.
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Campaign credited with turning around the sales of
milk
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Tagline licensed to dairy boards across U.S. and a
number of consumer goods and other groups have
capitalized on popularity of slogan
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Numerous awards
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“got milk?” the #1 most influential tag line since
the advent of television
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Society Of Actuaries
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Market Realities
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Opportunity for positioning
Businesses confronting complex risks
Part of larger organizational initiative
Actuaries face tough competition for senior
leadership positions in traditional markets
"Narrow and technical."
Too often, that's the
employer's perception of
the actuary, according to
research conducted by
the Society of Actuaries.
VS.
The “New” Actuary
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SOA Campaign Elements
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Goals:
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Create a more dynamic and
relevant image in the minds
of the employers
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Build a vibrant, new image
within the profession
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Create a sustainable
program that builds on each
success
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SOA Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Strategy: Launch the “Risk is Opportunity.”
integrated campaign with an internal focus
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Audiences:
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Actuaries
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Traditional market employers such as insurance
and benefits specialists
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Nontraditional market employers in the broader
financial services
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SOA Program Elements, cont’d
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Resources: Campaign budget unavailable;
2006 operating budget was $29.6 million
Timeline: Q4 2006 - Present
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Tactics:
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Multimedia launch event
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Speakers bureau
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Proactive media outreach
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Print ads
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SOA Ads
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SOA Campaign Elements, cont’d
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Tactics:
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Member outreach – “Living
the Brand”
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Posters
It’s also important for each of
us to assume the role of
brand ambassador. Each of us
needs to convey compelling
messages about what
actuaries do and how we add
value to an organization and
society at large.
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Video Series
–SOA Web site
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Image Advisory Group
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Workshop for ambassadors
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Web site overhaul
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Career-enhancing materials
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SOA “Living the Brand”
Above: Actuary Cocktail served at SOA
Annual Meeting
Top Left: A “thirst” for branding
Bottom Left: 14 Months of Actuaries
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SOA Posters
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SOA Campaign Results
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175 high-profile placements
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160 million media impressions
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Favorable member feedback
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91% tagline recognition
Award winner
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Corporate Branding Campaign of the Year
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Best Branding and Reputation Campaign
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Section II
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NRMCA: Factors for Consideration
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Analysis: Where are we today?
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NRMCA Market Realities
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Price of concrete/price of asphalt
Environmental impact vs. asphalt
Goals: Where do we want to go?
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NRMCA Goals
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Increase in market share
Heightened awareness among target audiences
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NRMCA: Factors for Consideration
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Strategy:
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NRMCA Strategy
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Focus on economic competitiveness
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Leverage the national conversation on sustainability
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Differentiate concrete from asphalt
Showcase concrete paving as a responsible choice for
sustainable development
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Make the most of market realities
Piggyback on industry-wide campaign
Maximize limited budget
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Targeted outreach must support business objectives
Strategic communications
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NRMCA: Factors for Consideration
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Audiences:
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NRMCA Audiences
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Internal
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Industry allies
Members
Staff
External
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Contractors
Engineers
Large developers and property owners
State and local government purchasers
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NRMCA: Factors for Consideration
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Tactics:
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NRMCA Tactics
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Internal ambassadors
Third party outreach
Leverage existing lines of communication
Trade show participation
Media outreach
Advertising
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NRMCA Spotlight on Tactics: Media Buy
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NRMCA Spotlight on Tactics: Media Buy
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NRMCA Spotlight on Tactics: Media Buy
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NRMCA Spotlight on Tactics: Media Buy
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NRMCA: Factors for Consideration
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Measuring success:
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Anticipating NRMCA Success
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Awareness
Image
Brand
Market share
Methods of measurement:
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Micro-site specific Web traffic
Baseline and benchmark awareness research
Media impressions
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Past Campaigns: Measuring Success
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Past Campaigns: Measuring Success
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Past Campaigns: Measuring Success
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NRMCA: Estimated Campaign Timeline
November
2008
December
2008
January
2009
February
2009
March
2009
April 2009
MayDecember
2009
Campaign planning meeting
Message development and testing
Communications planning and
development
Ad development
Ad placement
Media outreach (bylined articles and
interviews)
Materials development
Microsite development
Ambassador development/internal
rollout
Trade show identification and
participation
Third party outreach
Management and oversight
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Ad mock-up
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Ad mock-up:
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In Review
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What are the challenges our industry faces in
communicating its positive attributes?
What are the opportunities, i.e. 21st century
challenges for which our industry can provide
solutions?
Does our industry need to consider a strategic
communications campaign?
What are our goals?
Who are our audiences?
Do we have the resources to sustain a campaign that
can effect change?
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