Chapter 4 The United States and Canada Physical Geography

Report
CARDIO
1. LOOK
AT
PAGE
78.
BASED ON THE MAP, IN
TERMS
OF
NATURAL
VEGETATION,
WHAT
PART OF THE UNITED
STATES HAS THE MOST
IN
COMMON
WITH
CANADA?
Chapter 4: The United States and Canada:
Physical Geography
Section 1: Physical Features
The United States and Canada share the North American
continent. They also share landforms. In the West are the Rocky
Mountains, which extend through the United States and Canada. On the
spine, or top, of the Rockies is the Continental Divide.
All rivers to the east flow north, south, and east; all rivers to the west,
flow west. In the East are the Appalachian Mountains. In between
these mountain chains are plains, good areas for farming.
The United States and Canada share the
Great Lakes—Huron, Ontario, Michigan,
Erie, and Superior. These are the world’s
largest freshwater lakes, and they were
formed by melting glaciers, huge, slowmoving ice sheets.
In Canada, the St. Lawrence River connects the
Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. The St.
Lawrence
is
an
important
transportation
corridor, because it enables ships to travel all the
way from the Atlantic to the heart of the United
States and Canada. The major American river is
the Mississippi. The smaller Ohio and Missouri
rivers flow into the Mississippi and are called
tributaries.
Classroom Discussion
Questions:
1. What physical features do
Canada and the United States
share?
2. What are the major rivers in
the United States and Canada?
Section 2: Humans and the Physical
Environment
Climate—the average weather conditions of a
place—is affected by latitude, mountains, and
oceans. The climate of Canada is colder
than that of the United States because
Canada is farther from the Equator. The
northernmost part of Canada is tundra—cold
and dry and frozen for most of the year. Only
moss, grass, and some wildflowers grow here.
.
Central Canada has the world’s largest
prairie, or grassland, which is good for
farming and raising animals. Almost one-half of
Canada is made up of forests.
The United States has more extremes of
climate. Alaska is far north and very cold.
Hawaii and Florida are near the tropics, the
area between 23 degrees north, and 23 degrees
south latitudes; their climate is hot. The United
States contains prairies, and almost one-third of
the United States is forest land. The
Southwestern part of the United States
includes deserts. These are semiarid areas
with few plants
North American Vegetation
Pyramid:
Desert: few plants
Tundra: moss, grass, wildflowers
Prairie: grass; bushes; crops such as
corn and wheat
Forest: many trees and plants
Deserts have the least
Forests have the most.
vegetation.
Deserts have the least vegetation. Forests have the most.
Classroom Discussion
Questions:
1. What is climate and what
affects it?
2. What are the major
vegetation zones in North
America?
Section 3: Geographic Factors and Natural
Resources
Natural resources and resources
that occur in nature: soil, water,
minerals,
and
energy
resources, and trees. All four of
these resources are necessary for
people.
The Midwestern and Southern
parts of the United States have
rich soil that is good for farming.
It is called alluvial soil, which is
the topsoil left by rivers after a
flood.
Only about 12% of Canada’s land is good for
farming. This farmland is in the central prairie
and near the St. Lawrence River. The United
States and Canada grow grains, fruits, and
vegetables.
Water is needed for drinking,
growing
crops,
powering
industries, and transportation.
Dams along rivers generate
hydroelectricity, or power
generated by moving water.
Energy sources include coal, petroleum, and natural gas.
Mineral resources in the United States and Canada include
copper, gold, iron ore, lead, silver, zinc, and uranium.
The United States and Canada have vast forests. They produce
enough lumber for their own needs and for export.
Uses of Natural Resources:
SOIL
WATER
ENERGY
MINERALS
TREES
Grow food
Irrigation
Electricity
Jewelry
Paper
Raise
animals
Drinking
Light
Utensils
Furniture
Washing
Heating/Cooling
Pipes/Nails/
Machine parts
Lumber for
Houses
Transportation
Transportation
Energy
Hydroelectricity
Storage
batteries
Construction
Recreation
Classroom Discussion
Questions:
1. Name the most
important natural
resources.
2. What are important
uses of water?
Class Work
Text book:
1. Page 84
Review Key terms
Page 85
1. Map activity

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