To Kill a Mockingbird

Report
To Kill a
Mockingbird
MS NITSCHE
Introduction
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Start with TART
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(Title, Author, Refer to Task)
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You should also give a BRIEF outline of the story.
Now, write your own introduction.
YOU HAVE TEN MINUTES
Example
 ‘To
Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee
explores the prejudice surrounding a small
Southern community in the 1930s. Lee’s
use of imagery, juxtaposition and
exploration of morality highlights the racial
tensions present in the USA at this time,
and emphasises the part prejudice plays
in everyday human nature.
Point

The Point is simply what each paragraph is about- you make a
main point in every paragraph you write. This is usually the
TOPIC SENTENCE you use.

Do not signpost your paragraph e.g. do not say “I am going to
talk about”
What is a TOPIC SENTENCE?
This is basically a sentence that introduces
what the paragraph is going to be about.
You should mention WHAT you are going to discuss in the paragraph,
and refer back to the question.
REMEMBER YOUR KEY WORDS AND ALTERNATIVE LANGUAGE!
Topic Sentences
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All TOPIC SENTENCES should make some reference to the essay
question.

A good way to do this is through the KEY WORDS we extract from
the essay question.
Example Topic Sentences
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In ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Lee emphasises the social prejudices of
Maycomb through Scout’s own experiences of different classes in
the playground.
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Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting
the inferiority of status the black community has.

Through Scout and Jem’s games and stories of Boo Radley’s true
nature, we see how even those who do not engage with society
are judged in such a small community.
Referencing the question

A reader should be able to guess what the essay
question is simply by looking at your essay.

It is VITAL that you ensure you refer to the question
throughout – this is the only way you will be sure that you
have actually answered the question!
Evidence
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The evidence is the quotation or description of the scene, shot
or technique you are using to back up your point.

It is important that you pick evidence that you can explain and
evaluate FULLY.

Never just drop evidence in – always introduce them within the
CONTEXT of the story, i.e. what is happening at this point in the
story or film, what characters are involved and who they are,
etc.
EXAMPLE

TOPIC SENTENCE: Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in
the town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black
community has.
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EVIDENCE: At Tom’s trial, he makes the mistake of admitting
feeling empathy for Mayella Ewell.
“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’
Evaluation (Analysis)

This is the chance for you to explain how the quotation backs up
the point you are making

You need to make sure that you fully explain the quotation or
shot/scene/technique.

You then need to evaluate it - give your opinion on how successful
it is.

Your opinion should be implicit - do not write “I think”.
3 Steps for Analysing Quotations
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1. Break the sentence down – look at the meaning and
connotations of individual words, techniques and
phrases, as well as the whole sentence
e.g. “When they had finished their confessions the dogs
promptly tore their throats out”
“Promptly” is quite a ‘proper’ word, which contrasts sharply
with the messy manner of the executions, and says that
they were immediate and without mercy.
“Tore their throats out” is an incredibly graphic use of
IMAGERY, showing the brutality of their deaths, and “tore”
emphasises the violence of the execution.
3 Steps for Analysing Quotations

2. Think about what the whole sentence suggests
e.g. “When they had finished their confessions the dogs
promptly tore their throats out”
The sentence shows that there is no delay in doling out
‘justice’ to the pigs, and gives a sense of a lack of
justice in their fates.
3 Steps for Analysing Quotations
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3. Comment on the context of the quotation
e.g. “When they had finished their confessions the dogs promptly tore
their throats out”
The violence and swiftness of the executions highlights the extent that
Napoleon is willing to go to to maintain power – he has turned on his
own kind, and is now using fear and violence as a means of
controlling the animals.
EXAMPLE

TOPIC SENTENCE: Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the
town, highlighting the inferiority of status the black community has.

EVIDENCE: At Tom’s trial, he makes the mistake of admitting feeling
empathy for Mayella Ewell.
“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’
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EVALUATION: The repetition of sorry, as well as the tone of incredulity
in Mr Gilmer’s voice, emphasises the belief that -despite Mayella’s
horrific home life – a “nigger” has no place feeling empathy for
someone of a higher social standing, i.e. someone white. Here, Lee
successfully implies that Tom has in a sense signed his own death
warrant; by engaging with Mayella, and feeling “sorry” for her, he
has inadvertently placed himself above her in terms of social status,
and will now be seen as arrogant and not knowing of his ‘true
place’ in Maycomb’s society.
Putting P E E Together
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Point/ Topic Sentence.
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Evidence – description of scene and technique.
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Evaluation/Analysis.
And that’s ONE paragraph.
Which should look like this…
Lee goes on to explore the racial tensions in the town, highlighting
the inferiority of status the black community has. At Tom’s trial, he
makes the mistake of admitting feeling empathy for Mayella Ewell.
“ ‘You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?’
The repetition of ‘sorry’, as well as the tone of incredulity in Mr
Gilmer’s voice through the emphasis on ‘you’ highlights the belief
that -despite Mayella’s horrific home life – a “nigger” has no place
feeling empathy for someone of a higher social standing, i.e.
someone white. Here, Lee successfully implies that Tom has in a
sense signed his own death warrant; by engaging with Mayella,
and feeling “sorry” for her, he has inadvertently placed himself
above her in terms of social status, and will now be seen as
arrogant and not knowing of his ‘true place’ in Maycomb’s society.
How do we write a conclusion?
An effective conclusion should:

Refer back to the questions.
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Summarise your main points.
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Comment on how effective the writer/director has been in their use
of techniques.
Success Criteria
What makes a good essay?
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Good analysis – detail, relevant to question
Good evidence – description of
scene/shot/technique, relevant to question, able
to analyse in depth.
Topic sentences
Technical accuracy – punctuation, spelling,
paragraphs, phrasing, capitals.
Flows well – connectives/linking language, order
of techniques/scenes.
Wide vocabulary
REFER TO QUESTION!

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