This is the title - BC Federation of Foster Parent

Report
Improving Health &
Education Outcomes
for CYIC
BCFFPA AGM, May 23, 2009
Martin Wright
Ministry of Children and
Family Development
Objectives
1.
Share with foster parents what we are
doing and why;
2. Outline some evidence-based strategies
and approaches to their implementation
3. Consult Foster Parents on how we can do
this most effectively; and
4. Begin on-going communication and
collaboration with foster parents on this
initiative
1
What We Want
1. For every child to reach her/his full potential
2. To be as effective as we can to improve the
health and educational attainment of CYIC

A key element of Strong, Safe & Supported is to
improve the health and well-being of children
and youth

Today’s focus is on education
2
What We Know
3
What We Know
According to the international literature Children and
Youth in Care have:
Relatively
low educational attainment levels
Very
low participation rates in post-secondary
education
Less
schooling because of:
Absenteeism
for reasons of health or moving
Truancy
Tardiness
Dropping-out
Exclusion
Bullying:
or suspension
more likely to be perpetrators and victims
4
But What Can We Expect?
Conditions common at admission:
 Double trauma of maltreatment plus removal
 Low birth weight
 Small/large for gestational age
 Perinatal conditions, e.g. respiratory system,
hypertension
 Social, emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities
 More likely to have a chronic disease such as
asthma, psychiatric disorders – particularly
behavioural, attention deficit hyperactivity and
anxiety
 Behind in immunizations
 Poor dental health
5
Educational Special Needs
Moderate to
severe
intellectual
disability
Physical
disability/chronic
health impairment
Intensive behaviour
intervention/serious
mental illness
Children
in care
3%
6%
29 %
Children
never in
care
0.4 %
1 %
2%
Data source: Representative for Children and Youth
6
Graduation Rate Comparison
Graduation Rates by Selected Population Segment
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
All Children
With Special Needs, Without Special With Special Needs,
Not in Care
Needs, Not in Care
in Care
Data source: Representative for Children and Youth
7
Are Such Educational Outcomes
Inevitable?
No.



Many CIC do well at school;
Some groups fare better than others. E.G.
Girls do better than boys and nonAboriginal CIC do better than Aboriginal
CIC; and
We know the factors associated with
educational attainment and how to
influence many of them
8
Educational Attainment: The Factors
1.
Individual - e.g. early development, self esteem and
efficacy, attendance, continuity, effort, behaviour and
aspirations. Prior achievement is very significant as learning
begets learning.
2. Family - socio-economic status, parenting style, parental
education, expectations, involvement in and monitoring of
the child’s education.
3. Peer - e.g. influence and fear of rejection.
4. Community – social, economic and historical factors.
5. School e.g. leadership, teacher quality, expectations,
resources, school type, connectedness, composition of
enrollment that are vulnerable.
9
Strategies
Stability
and continuity
MCFD
placement
School
exclusions and suspensions
Planning
and monitoring
Caregiver

involvement
School connectedness and attachment
School
The
effects: leadership and teaching
early years
10
What Can We Do?
Research has shown repeatedly that parental involvement at
home is by far the most important influence
Relative Influence on Educational Attainment of 'At Home' Elements of
Parental Involvement
2
2.1
1.6
1.5
1.5
1
1.0
0.5
0.5
0
Expectation of
attainment
Participation
Other
Communication
Supervision
Adapted from Fan and Chen, Parental involvement and students’ academic Achievement: A Meta Analysis. Ed. Psych. Rev, Vol13, No1
11
What Can We Do?
Parental expectations emerge time and again
as the most important
 Far more important than parental social
class or level of education
 Parental interest in their child’s education
has up to four times more influence on
attainment by age 16 than socio-economic
background.
 Parental expectations can add 1.3 years
on student progression.
12
What Can We Do?

Parental expectations and interest tend to
be higher with:




Higher socio-economic status
Level of mother’s education
The child’s attainment
Research shows that generally, children
from deprived backgrounds that performed
well at age 2 are by six or seven overtaken
by less able but non-deprived children.
13
High Expectations: What it Means

Conveying frequently and consistently to
the child/youth


Reinforced by recognising successes
Cultivating self esteem and efficacy, aspirations
Also includes:




Ensuring regular attendance
Homework and study support
Monitoring attainment, including
discussions with educators and social
workers
High expectations of appropriate behaviour
14
It’s Never Too Early…
1.
2.
To convey high expectations of
attainment to fullest potential;
To sow the seeds of future highereducation possibilities in the minds of
young children.

Building confidence, motivation and selfesteem = higher aspirations and self efficacy
And it’s never too late – secure attachments
can be formed by young people even when
placed at a relatively late age
15
Partnerships and Strong Networks











BC Foster Parents Federation
Biological Parents
Federation of BC Youth in Care Network
Boards of Education
Principles and Vice Principles Associations
Teachers
Ministries of Education, Advanced Ed, Health
Services & Healthy Living and Sport
Health authorities
Health Officers Council
Aboriginal Leadership
Other jurisdictions
16
Your Thoughts
Educational Attainment
How can we support Children and Youth in
Care to achieve their potential?
17
Ministry of
Children and Family
Development
18

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