Document

Report
Source Water Protection
The Great Lakes RCAP
Process for Planning
SMART Design Committee Workshop
Presented by:
Julie Ward
Ohio Field Agent
April 29, 2008
Incentive for Planning

The 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking
Water Act Required Every State to Develop
and Implement a Source Water Assessment
and Protection (SWAP) Plan that Includes:

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Determining the source area for all public water
systems (PWS).
Identifying potential contaminant sources.
Determining the susceptibility of the PWS to
contamination.
The Planning Process

Form Stakeholder Committee

Identify Public Input Strategies

Update/Review Potential Contaminant
Source Inventory & Prioritize

I.D. Management Strategies & Prioritize
The Planning Process

Review/Revise Contingency Plan

Identify Need for Groundwater Monitoring
Program

Develop Continuing Public Education &
Involvement Strategies

Action Plan
Project Goals
Continue to provide
safe drinking water
to residents while
increasing public
involvement and
awareness of the
need to protect their
drinking water
supply.
Stakeholder Committee

Diverse Interests
Public Water Supplier
Watershed Coordinator
Health Department
Local Officials/CIC
Teachers
Farmer/SWCD
Business Owner/Large Water
Users
OSU Extension
Concerned Citizens
EPA’s Source Water Assessment

Consist of 3 steps:
Delineate Protection Area.
 Inventory Potential Contaminant Sources.
 Determine the Water Supply’s Susceptibility
to Contamination.


Assessments:

Provide the Information Necessary to Develop a
Protection Plan.
Delineation Approach

Method is selected based on:
Hydrogeologic Setting
 Availability of Data
 Pump Rate


Method does not vary by type of
public water system.
Bedrock Geology & Karst Features
Legend
 Karst
Devonian
 Columbus Ls
 Ohio Shale
Silurian
 Salina
Delineated Karst Region
4 counties
2 cities
3 villages
18 townships
Potential Contaminant
Source Inventory

Database Search

Land Use Analysis

Site Visit
Susceptibility Analysis
Description of Hydrologic Setting
 Summary of Potential Contaminant
Sources
 Review of Water Quality Data
 Pointers to Protection Activities

Identifying Community Assets

Civic Groups

Business Associations

Media Outlets

Community Events, Festivals
Public Input & Education

Presentations

Community Survey

Community Forum
Presentations
Community & Civic Group Meetings
 Schools
 Community Events

fact sheets
 brochures
 coloring books

Community Survey
Residents rank potential sources in
order of risk
 Residents rank management options

use as educational tool
 allows all residents to feel sense of
“ownership” in plan
 allows committee to gauge level of support
for options

Community Forum
Discuss survey results
 Chance for residents to discuss their
concerns
 Another public education opportunity
 Solicit additional volunteers to work on
issues

Updated Inventory Results

Around 35 potential
contaminant sources
were identified.

Few sources in the 1
year time of travel
(inner zone).
Final Prioritization

Public Water Systems

Rural Residential

Agricultural

Class V Injection Wells
Examples of Strategies

Regulatory
Land Use Controls: zoning, subdivision
controls, building and fire codes, health
regulations
 Source Prohibitions/Restrictions
 Design/Operating Standards
 Reporting Requirements and
Documentation

Examples of Strategies cont.

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Nonregulatory
Sole Source Aquifer Designation
Purchasing property/development rights
Hazardous Materials Rerouting&Pickup
Best Management Practices
Education/Training
Facility spill/contingency planning
Water Conservation
Best Management Practices

Practices in Place

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Proper Septic
Maintenance
Buffer Stripping
Physical
Containments
Around
Sink Holes
Just in Time Delivery
Recycling
Best Management Practices

New Strategies
Increase Buffer
& Reduce
Chemical Use
 Properly Seal
Abandoned Wells

Public Education

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Display at
County Fairs
Presentations
News Releases
Articles
Fact Sheets
Contingency/Emergency
Response Components
Short & Long term alternative sources
of drinking water
 Financial mechanisms to implement
above
 Emergency response plan
address spills
contacts

Monitoring Plan
Locations of proposed monitoring sites
 The pollution sources and contaminants
to be monitored
 Process or description (well
construction) of mechanism used
 Sampling Schedule

Public Education

As Part of the Management Plan
Community Systems: Community-Wide
Campaign
 Noncommunity Systems: Employee
Education
 Agriculture: Soil & Water, Farm Bureau
 Rural Residential: Realtor, Bankers, Health
Department
 Injection Wells: Community Campaign

Public Involvement

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
Stakeholders
Volunteers for Inventory
Meetings with:

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Health Departments
Soil & Water
City of Bellevue
Community Meetings
County Farm Bureau
Meetings
Action Planning
Description of Strategies to be used
 Implementation
 Time frames
 List of Individuals involved

Sandusky River Watershed
Implementation - Long Term
Sustainability

Institutional
Framework


Join the Sandusky
River Watershed
Coalition (karst
subcommittee)
Legal and Nonlegal
Frameworks
Acknowledgements

Most of these slides were taken from a
series of presentations so thanks to all
the following:
Heather Raymond, Ohio EPA
 Richard Kroeger, Ohio EPA
 Deb Martin, Great Lakes RCAP
 Kristen Woodall, Great Lakes RCAP


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