Behavioral Emergencies - Vista Unified School District

Report
Medical Office Administration
2nd edition
Brenda A. Potter, CPC
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1
Chapter 8
Patient Reception and
Registration
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2
Changes in Healthcare Service
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Extended hours beyond 9 to 5
Large clinics have branch locations
Health care promotes services
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
3
Exceptional Patient Service
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Providing best possible assistance
“Going the extra mile”
Wouldn’t you want the same for yourself or
your family?
Always ask, “What is best for the patient?”
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
4
Why Provide Exceptional Service?
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The service that is provided to patients
reflects the level of caring and commitment of
the medical office staff
Exceptional service makes patients more
confident about services provided in the
office.
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
5
Basics of Exceptional Service
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Everyone must be committed to exceptional
service
Patients ARE customers!
Patients are #1!!
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
6
Patient Informational Materials
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Can include
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Services offered
Directory of phone numbers and addresses
Directions to facility
A must for new patients
But not a substitute for personal
communication with a patient
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
7
Getting the Office Ready
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Many things happen before the office opens
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Deactivate alarm systems at entrances; unlock
front door when ready to receive patients
 Secured entrances may require employees to
swipe name badge
 Obtain charts for the day’s appointments
 Start and check office equipment
 Turn on television or music system
 Count cash drawer
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
8
Welcoming Patients
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Patient should be acknowledged immediately
Avoid personal comments about patient’s
appearance
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
9
Patient Registration
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Every patient – new or established – should
go through registration process
Registration is a vital step in the billing
process
Existing patients will need registration verified
New patients will take longer than existing
patients because a new record is created
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
10
Registration Form
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
11
Information Gathered at Registration
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Patient’s personal information – name, address,
DOB, phone
Guarantor’s information – name, address, DOB,
phone
Patient’s insurance – name, address, phone, policy
and group number
Patient’s referral information – has the patient been
referred to the office by another healthcare provider?
Emergency contact
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Sometimes someone not living with the patient
Authorizations
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Release of medical information to insurance company
Assignment of insurance benefits to be sent to physician
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
12
Patient History Form
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Review of
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Patient’s past medical history
Allergies and other pertinent medical information
Family history
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
13
Notice of Privacy Practices
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Informs patient about how the patient’s health
information may be used
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
14
Confidentiality and Registration
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Pay attention to volume of speech
Don’t repeat reason for patient’s visit
Registration stations should be partitioned
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
15
Reception Area
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Reception area or lobby, NOT waiting room
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
16
Layout and Design of the Reception Area
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Welcoming atmosphere
Adequate traffic
patterns – consider
ADA
Appropriate seating
arrangement
Television or music (or
both)
Reading material
Something for kids
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Refreshments
Wheelchair
Coat-rack
Wastebasket
Clock
Restroom
Reception area must be
maintained by front
desk staff
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
17
Emergency Situations
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Emergency – when a patient’s health may be
adversely affected if immediate action is not
taken; possibly even life threatening
Recognize potential emergencies
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
18
Common Medical Emergencies
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Chest pain
Seizure
Respiratory
distress
Diabetic episodes
Profuse,
uncontrolled
bleeding
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Head injury
syncope
Psychotic episode
Eye injury
Burns
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
19
What the Medical Administrative Assistant
Should Do in an Emergency
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Get the patient to a physician or nurse as
soon as possible
Use a wheelchair to transport patient
Use 911 if necessary
Protect the patient’s privacy as much as
possible
Follow the physicians established protocol
Locate family members if necessary
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
20
Other Situations
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Fractures
Acutely ill or uncomfortable patients
Copyright © 2010, 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
21

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