Putnam County Youth Bureau - Association of Nys Youth Bureaus

Report
PUTNAM COUNTY
YOUTH BUREAU
Collaboration and Sustainability
October 2011
AGENDA
Background
 Programs of the Youth Bureau
 Challenges Facing Youth Bureaus
 Collaboration with Community Sectors
 Discussion

BACKGROUND ON THE YOUTH BUREAU
The Putnam County Youth Bureau was
established by the Board of Supervisors in 1979
and is part of the Departments of Mental Health,
Social Services and Youth Bureau and a liaison
to the New York State Office of Children and
Family Services.
 Responsible to the County Executive for
coordinating and supplementing the activities of
public, private and religious agencies devoted in
whole or in part to the welfare, development and
protection of youth. Through the Integrated
County Planning process, the Youth Bureau
coordinates the allocation of resources to meet
those needs.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Youth Bureau has the primary responsibility
of advocating for the youth of Putnam County.
The Youth Bureau promotes positive youth
development based upon the belief that families
and extended families are the fundamental
sources of care, support and guidance for children
and youth. Our schools and other communitybased services, both formal and informal, are
appropriate and effective complements to this
foundation.
SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY
 Information
 Education
and Training
 Referrals
 Coordination
of Resources
 Advocacy for Youth and Families
SERVICES TO SCHOOLS, RECREATION
DEPARTMENTS, COMMUNITY AGENCIES
AND COMMUNITY GROUPS
Comprehensive Planning for Youth Services
 Prevention Programs
 Speakers Bureau
 Assistance in Grant Writing and Program
Development
 Referrals to the Entire Network of Youth
Services in Putnam County
 Clearing House for Statistics

PROGRAMS OF THE
YOUTH BUREAU
Programs funded by the NYS Office of Children and
Family Services and the County of Putnam
COORDINATED CHILDREN’S SERVICE
INITIATIVE OF PUTNAM COUNTY
 CCSI
is a partnership between family
members and service providers designed
to assist families whose children have
mental health needs. Our goal is to keep
families together by creating linkages to
community based services.
RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH
PROGRAM
This program provides shelter for runaway and
homeless youth and serves as a community-based
referral and counseling network.
 Ensures that services to runaway and homeless
youth and their families are provided in
accordance with runaway and homeless youth
regulations.

PEGASUS
A confidential Program of Hope for youth ages 614 whose lives are impacted by loved ones
suffering from alcoholism and/or other drug
dependencies. A parent or guardian must attend
a simultaneous adult group.
 Through arts, crafts, and games participants
learn they did not cause the problem and how to
develop coping skills.
 Runs for 8 weeks, twice a year, one day a week.
 Pegasus is a safe place for kids to talk about their
feelings and learn that they are not alone.

REALITY CHECK
A Youth Empowerment Program meetings once a week
that allows teens the opportunity to…
Reach
Everyone
And make them aware of
Lies that the big
Industry of
Tobacco is feeding
Youth
and also to
Challenge not only the
Horrible enemy but
Even yourself to
Chip in and
Kick some big Tobacco Ash

YOUTH AWARDS
Annual Spring dinner designed to recognize
outstanding youth volunteers whose community
service efforts benefit the residents of Putnam
County.
 Planned annually by the Putnam County Youth
Board.

YOUTH BOARD

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The youth board may be composed of a maximum of 28 voting
members, which must include a minimum of two youth members
under the age of 21 years.
Membership is open to adults and students who work, reside or
attend schools in Putnam.
Potential members submit a youth board application and are invited
to attend our Youth board meetings, normally held on the 3rd
Wednesday of the month at 4 PM. After attending three board
meetings, the board votes to recommend that the County Executive
appoint the person to the board for a two year term. Each December,
the Youth Board elects a President,
vice-president, a Secretary and other officers if deemed necessary and
appropriate. Each officer serves a one year term.
The Youth Board assists with developing and recommending effective
policies, programs and projects for positive youth development and
the prevention and control of juvenile delinquency and youth crime.
In addition, the Youth Board takes the responsibility for the planning
and presentation of the Youth Awards Dinner at which youth who
have provided significant work as volunteers in their communities.
The Youth Bureau is responsible for developing and implementing
the comprehensive plan for youth services in Putnam County.
YOUTH COURT
Youth Court is a peer court program established
to reduce incidents of juvenile crime by serving as
a community based alternative to Family Court.
Volunteer members throughout Putnam County
participate in a 10 week training program that
prepares them to serve in the roles of Judge,
Defense Attorney, Prosecuting Attorney, Court
Clerk and Officer in actual cases of first time
offending youths under 16 charged with a crime.
 Youth court members must reside or attend
school in Putnam.

YOUTH FORUM
A collaborative effort between Cornell
Cooperative Extension and the Putnam County
Youth Bureau. This is a one day conference
planned and run by high school students for High
school students.
 The forum offers a variety of workshops lead by
speakers on teen-chosen topics. A Planning
Committee of teen volunteers begins to meet
early in December to plan for the Spring event.

CHALLENGES FACING
YOUTH BUREAUS IN
NEW YORK STATE
CHALLENGES
Budget
 Consolidation
 Lack of collaborative activities
 Money must be used wisely
 Not enough of an established presence in the
community.

Measures to assist in facing challenges
COLLABORATION
ACHIEVEMENTS AND
ADVOCACY
Collaboration helps to ensure sustainability and
recognition within your community! Diversity
issues must be a constant consideration. Youth
Bureaus must create structures that will foster
unity within the community and facilitate the
joint work of all sectors of society,
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AND LEADERS

Putnam County District Attorney – we work
closely with this department on legal
ramifications of Bullying, underage Driving
While Intoxicated or Possession of Marijuana
cases. Collaboration is achieved through school
and community based prevention.
Pictures from 2011 Bullying Hope Forum
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AND LEADERS

New York State Senate: work with your
representatives to highlight achievements and
the importance of maintaining funding.
January 11, 2011: The
Putnam Youth Bureau
visited Senator Ball on
Tuesday to discuss
Reality Check, and
receive Certificates of
Recognition for their
successful campaign to
make Town of Carmel
parks and playgrounds
smoke-free.
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AND LEADERS
Local Legislature: work with your local
Legislature on Proclamations for public
observances (such as Recovery Month, Children
of Alcoholics week, etc.). Advocacy is essential!
 Attend Legislative meetings, hearings, and
health committee evenings to stay current on
local updates. Establish a presence.

Joseph DeMarzo discusses the dangers of teenage drinking at the meeting
while Kristin Cafiero listens.
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AND LEADERS

County Executive and
County Legislature:

Example: Putnam County was
the first in New York State to
achieve the Social Host
Liability Law in all of its
towns. This was achieved with
the inclusion of the Putnam
County Youth Bureau, the
Putnam County Drug Task
Force, the Putnam County
Communities That Care
Coalition, and local
government buy in.
MEDIA

Send press releases on a consistent basis
on Youth Bureau and collaborative
activities. Remember to always get
consent from students/parents on photos
taken.
MEDIA CONTINUED
ADDITIONAL MEDIA PSA’S AS AN
ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY
Collaboration with Putnam County Communities That Care. On Billboards, the DMV, and print PSA’s.
NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
The Youth Bureau works closely with the
Putnam County Communities That Care
Coalition.
 The coalition, funded by the Drug Free
Communities grant, follows a strategic
prevention framework that addresses risk and
protective factors associated with substance
abuse, delinquency, teen pregnancy, school
dropout and violence.

NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

Examples of collaborative work with Communities That Care and the Putnam
County Youth Bureau:
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Pre Prom Presentations: mandated training for parents to enable their children to
attend the prom. Approximately 3000 parents attend the training annually. Trainings
take place at three large school districts in the County.
Simulated Impaired Driving Experience Trainings: Focuses on alcohol, drugged and
distracted driving. 15 three hour trainings a summer for students who want to attain
senior parking privileges. Year round trainings for PTA’s, school boards, and
businesses.
Collaboration on PSA’s
Medication Take Back Days (awarded the Fred Dill Award for networking excellence
by the Putnam Community Service Network in September 2011.
Medication Take Back Days: Sheriff Donald B.
Smith, Pat Varveri, Pharmacist Alfred
Dioguardi, Jason Chen, and Naura Slivinsky
NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
The Coalition is responsible for the Prevention
Needs Assessment Survey, which is completed
every two years by all school districts in the
County.
 The survey is completed by students grade 8-12
through passive consent and is voluntary,
confidential, and anonymous.
 Community partners, including the Youth
Bureau, base its activities on the survey results.

TREATMENT ORGANIZATIONS

Ex: Putnam Family and Community Services:
Provides chemical dependency services
 Does school based prevention with the Youth Bureau


Ex: Green Chimneys:

Arbor House - Green Chimneys Children's Services:
Provides crisis intervention, counseling and case
management services to runaway and homeless
youth or youth at risk of running away or becoming
homeless and their families. Arbor House also offers
emergency shelter through a six bed Safe House or
through a network of Interim Families. Youth
Bureau provides referral services.
LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT
Work closely with Student Resource Officers on
school based prevention.
 Local law enforcement is a necessity for safety at
public events.
 Work with your Probation Department when
working with juvenile delinquents.

YOUTH, PARENTS, AND SCHOOLS

School based prevention trainings on:

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Bullying
Suicide
Healthy relationships
Alcohol and Other Drugs
Teen Pregnancy
The Truth About Energy Drinks
Prescription Drug Abuse
Social Host Liability Law
Feature substance abuse speakers such as Michael
Nerney, Ty Sells, etc.
RECREATION DEPARTMENTS
Youth Bureau’s should work with local recreation
departments that provide structured, supervised
leisure time of teens.
 Recreation Centers can be a great source of
healthy fun as it relates to camps, sports clinics,
and community programs. They can also offer
pizza nights for middle school aged children,
pilates, kickboxing, martial arts, volleyball, intertown youth basketball, men’s basketball, after
school bowling.
 Pro: Recreation Departments have active and
passive recreation.

FAITH BASED ORGANIZATIONS
Regardless of religious background, religious or
fraternal organizations are a strong way to reach
word to parents and youth.
 Ask faith based leaders to advertise youth
bureau family oriented programs in their
newsletters and websites.
 Faith based organizations often volunteer and
even provide childcare during events.

LARGE SCALE COMMUNITY EVENTS

Community events with numerous
stakeholders increases the value of the
Youth Bureau. Example: the Putnam
County Annual Recovery Walk was a
collaboration between treatment
facilities, not for profits, businesses
(who provided vending), law
enforcement, and local government
agencies.
QUESTIONS
AND
DISCUSSION
PRESENTED BY:
Joseph A. DeMarzo, Director of the Putnam County
Youth Bureau/Mental Health Bureau
Contact: 110 Old Route Six, Carmel, NY 10512
[email protected] or call
(845) 808-1600

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