Slide 1

Report
Standards-Based Report Cards
Community Forum
November 14, 2012
The “work” behind the scenes
• The Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment
(CIA) committee researched the concept last year.
• A committee representing all grade levels K - 5
worked collaboratively during the summer.
• Draft copies of report cards were crafted using the
CCS and shared with colleagues.
• Teacher input relative to the drafts was requested.
Suggestions/edits helped shape the new report card.
Cause for a revision - Coherence
• The existing report card required revision
• A timely release of the Common Core
Standards
• Our district’s on-going curriculum
initiatives
Grades circa ? Revision needed?
Curriculum initiatives
Language Arts Literacy
Mathematics
LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY
Reading
Applies phonics and word analysis skills to decode words
Reads with fluency (e.g., accuracy, rate and expression)
Applies reading strategies (e.g., rereads, makes connections,
defines vocabulary using context clues, visualizes and uses text
features)
Reads with literal comprehension (e.g., recounts key details,
identifies main idea, sequences events & summarizes)
Reads with inferential comprehension (e.g., predicts, draws
conclusions, identifies cause-and-effect , makes inferences,
compares and contrasts & identifies point of view)
Reads independently at the benchmark level (with fluency,
accuracy, comprehension and retelling/summary)
WRITING
Recognizes & applies spelling patterns
Generates, develops and supports ideas
Applies conventions in writing (e.g., capitalization, punctuation,
usage and grammar)
Uses a variety of descriptive words and writes complete sentences
of varying lengths (e.g., vocabulary and sentence structures)
Takes compositional risks (e.g., uses figurative language, dialogue
that drives action, precise vocabulary)
Writes for a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g., narrative and
expository writing)
D
D
M
M
J
J
LISTENING/SPEAKING
Exhibits active listening and engages in meaningful conversation
(e.g., one-on-one, in groups and teacher- led)
Expresses ideas, thoughts and feelings clearly and effectively
D
M
J
MATHEMATICS
Multiplies and divides within 100
Uses place value understanding and properties of operations to
perform multi-digit arithmetic
Solves problems involving the four operations; identifies and explains
patterns in arithmetic
Represents and solves problems involving multiplication and division
Demonstrates understanding of the relationships that exist within the
four operations
Solves problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals
of time, liquid volumes and masses of objects. Represents and
interprets data
Develops understanding of fractions as numbers
Expresses and applies mathematical thinking (e.g. reasoning,
persevering, interpreting, and using appropriate tools)
SCIENCE
Demonstrates knowledge of facts and understanding of concepts
Applies knowledge to solve scientific investigations
SOCIAL STUDIES
Demonstrates understanding of vocabulary and concepts
Applies knowledge to classroom discussions and activities
D
M
J
D
M
J
D
M
J
Grading vs. Assessment
Grading
Assessment
The goal of grading is to
evaluate individual student’s
performance.
Grades are sometimes treated
as substitute for student
learning.
Grades can incorporate
participation and effort into a
“grade”– these are not direct
measures of learning.
The goal of assessment is to
improve student learning.
Grading does plays a role in
assessment.
Assessment goes beyond
grading by examining patterns
of student learning ,using
this information to improve
teaching and learning, and is
developmentally responsive
Historical perspectives…
• Grading ‘systems’ can be deeply rooted in
long standing beliefs of teachers, parents,
and students. (Unfortunately, as students, we were all subjected to some of
these beliefs during our education. “Turn and talk” to a neighbor about a negative grading
“memory”.)
• There can also be very personalized practices
embedded in grading. ( Neatness counts! Spelling counts! Speed counts!
Etc. counts! )
Why change systems and past practices?
Why shift to a standards-based report
card?
• Provide clarity – Standards-Based grading embraces clearly
defined proficiency levels with regard to specific skills at each
grade level and in each trimester.
• Rethink the status quo – Consider the inclusion of homework
and / or extra credit assignments being factored into “grades”.
Do such practices really reflect conceptual understanding or
meeting a standard?
• Adjust instruction – differentiate - Standards-based grades
help teachers adjust instruction.
Additional reasons for the change
• Connect to reforms - Standards-based grading is directly
linked to other current reforms. (e.g., the Common Core
Standards)
• Maximize assessments - Increased use of formative and
summative assessment measures will better inform teachers,
students, and parents of proficiency levels …and impact
instructional decision making.
•
Make quality matter – Create an expectation in which the
standards that are set…must be met! Learning and teaching
are focused on achieving standards. Think mastery!
What is a standards based report
card?
• Standards-based report
card focuses on the
identified skills students
should learn in each subject
area during each trimester
at each grade level.
• Standards-based grades are
not about what the
students earn; grades are
more about what students
learn.
• Standards-based report
cards inform parents what
exactly is being taught, what
students are expected to
learn, and how well
students are progressing
aligned to set standards.
Assessment success…
• Earning a “4” means a
student has advanced
mastery and extends
key concepts, processes
and skills.
• A student receiving “4”
clearly and consistently
demonstrates superior
skills and exceeds the
standard.
• Earning a “3” means the
student has proficient
understanding and
grasps and applies key
concepts, processes,
and skills.
• A student receiving a
“3” is meeting the
standard. This is the
proficiency level where
students exhibit
mastery.
Working towards academic success
• Earning a “2” means the
student has a basic
understanding and is
beginning to grasp and apply
key concepts, processes, and
skills.
• A student receiving a “2”
understands the concept or
skill, but has not yet reached
the proficient level. A “2”
indicates to parents extra
time /practice is needed.
• Earning a “1” grade means
the student has minimal
understanding and is not
grasping key concepts,
processes, and skills.
• A student receiving a “1”
may be experiencing
academic delays according
to the standards . Progress
on subsequent report cards
may require interventions
to learn and progress as
expected.
Skill and trimester specific standards
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
• Assessments within a
standards-based system are
aligned with delineated skills
in a given trimester at specific
grade levels.
• A “2” in an early trimester
does not automatically change
to a “3”. Conversely a “3”
could change to a “2”
dependent on the rigor of a
particular skill.
• Assessments are reflective of
the trimester’s targeted skills
not a linear performance over
the course of the year.
FAQs
• Why change from traditional grading practices? Objectivity, an
accurate picture, and mastery are key reasons for the need to
change from traditional practices.
• Why use the standards?
By comparing a child’s performance to a clear standard –
parents, students, and teachers all know precisely what is
expected. Students performance is compared to the standard,
not other students’ performances.
• Will teachers still record grades?
Teachers will use a variety of measures to assess students.
Grades are a part of assessment.
RVSD is “connecting the dots”
Curricular
initiatives
Common
Core
Assessment
reform
Standards-based report cards
Help us in assessing your children.
Your support is essential to our initiatives.
Thanks for attending- spread the word.

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