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Implementing Common Core:
A Focus on Early Literacy
Module- 4
Book Study: Rigorous Reading, Ch. 6
Presenters:
LaRae Blomquist, Susie Lapachet,
Christina McColley, Jenny Smith
and Patty Tong
March 5, 2015
Debrief Module 3
As a result of the book study on Chapter 4 on
collaborative conversations and review of ELD data in
January/February, what steps (if any) did you take or
did you plan to take at your site?
Outcomes
Participants will:
• Understand what it means to
connect reading to writing
• Connect high-quality, first-time
instruction to ELD modes of
communication
• Explore key areas from
administrative lens of The Synced
Solution
Connecting the Dots:
Give One Get One
Think about the three
previous
sessions:
• Consider any personal AH HAs or
salient points.
1.ELA/ELD
Connection
• Record thinking in provided space.
2.Text
Complexity
• Be prepared to Give One/Get One…
3.Structuring
even if it is a question about a
Collaborative
session.
Conversations
Connecting the Dots:
Give One Get One
1. ELA/ELD Connection
• Navigating the ELD/ELA
matrix
• Expanding, emerging,
bridging
• Language frames (ELD
#3: offering/supporting
opinions)
• Banks of TDQs
• ELD walk-through form
Relevance to Administrative Role
• Closing the achievement gap
– # of significant sub-groups who do not have
literacy proficiency—specifically served with ELD
standards/instructional approach
• Integrated ELD instruction in all content areas
• LCAP goals/site plan
Connecting the Dots:
Give One Get One
2. Text Complexity
• Anchor standards to
grade-specific
• Text complexity:
quantitative, qualitative,
reader & task
• Banks of TDQs
Relevance to Administrative Role
• Knowing the “right” questions to ask
regarding supplemental text purchases and
site use
– How does your novel request/use fulfill gradelevel expectations of text complexity? What are
the key teaching points?
– Which unit in Synced Solution do you see this text
being used in an integrated manner?
Connecting the Dots:
Give One Get One
3. Collaborative Conversations
•Structures that can support
collaborative learning
•Connectivity between ELA
Speaking/Listening and ELD
standards
•Walk-Through data
Relevance to Administrative Role
• Teacher observation/evaluation
• EL Walk-Through form
• High-quality, first-time instruction using
consistent protocols for structured student
interaction
• Quality/complexity of student tasks (“planned
failure”)
• Reinforcing protocols during staff PD or
meetings
Connecting Writing Instruction to
Reading Instruction
More Than Personal Connections
Reread pp. 123-125
How do these pages represent
shifts in reading and writing
instruction?
What are the implications for a site
leader? (e.g. school-wide writing
plan)
Accessing Complex Texts Requires
More Than Personal Connections
• Model before you expect.
• Pose questions that require students to
return to the text.
• Ask students to provide evidence to
support their opinions and ideas.
• Require students to write rhetorically.
Shared Understanding of Terminology
Rhetorical Writing –
Academic writing that interprets information for
a clear purpose, organization, and intended
audience in a logical and persuasive manner
(Not to be confused with a particular CCSS
writing standard).
Determining Where to Start When
Accessing Complex Text
Before modeling, TDQs, supporting evidence,
and writing rhetorically, we need to ask
ourselves:
• What text will I use?
• How will I connect reading to writing?”
ANSWER: Analyze
for text complexity
NOTE: Text Complexity and Reading
Aloud
• K/1st – high-quality, complex text for oral
reading comprehension
• 2nd/3rd – high-quality, complex text for all
students to access with their own copies
The Day the Crayons Quit
Text Complexity
Lexile Band for 2nd/3rd Grade:
450 – 790
730 LEXILE
Quantitative: (e.g., lexile)
• Sentence length
• Frequency of words
• Multi-syllabic
Analyze Text Complexity:
Quantitative Think Aloud (2nd Grade)
Quantitative: (e.g., lexile)
• Sentence length
• Frequency of words
• Multi-syllabic
Lexile Band for 2nd/3rd Grade:
730 within 450 – 790
Analyze Text Complexity:
Qualitative Think Aloud (2nd Grade)
Analyze Text Complexity:
Qualitative Think Aloud (2nd Grade)
• Organization: RL-5
(text structure)
• Narration: RL – 6
(point of view)
• Text Features:
capitalized &
underlined words
• Graphics: RL – 7
(illustrations &
text)
Analyze Text Complexity:
Reader & Task Think Aloud (2nd Grade)
Reader & Task
• Complexity of task
compared to complexity
of quantitative and
qualitative demands
Transitioning from Analysis to
Instructional Planning
• Read the Analyzing
Text Complexity
handout.
• Notice the
connection
between the
analysis of the 3
components of Text
Complexity to text
dependent
questions.
Transitioning from Analysis to
Instructional Planning
How does the instruction
represent Fisher & Frey’s
Accessing Complex Text bullets?
• Model before you expect.
• Pose questions that require
students to return to the text.
• Ask students to provide
evidence to support their
opinions and ideas.
• Require students to write
rhetorically.
Table/Whole Group Debrief
• What AH-HAs or salient
points resonated with
you?
• What clarifying questions
do you have?
• How might these
resources/info be relevant
to you as a site
administrator?
Setting the Purpose for
Upcoming Activities
• Connection to CCSS Collaborative Learning
that teachers received
• “Concrete-ify” integrated ELA Common Core
instruction for observations, walk-throughs,
assessing staff development needs,
communicating/correcting writing resource
use (e.g., SUTW), and creating school-wide
writing plans
Require students to write rhetorically.
From Reading to Writing Instruction
RL 7 – Focus of writing
K-3, 6 Prompt Progression…Tied to
Reading AND Writing Standards
1. Read just the
reading
standards in
each dotted box.
2. Underline the
key shifts from
grade-to-grade.
3. Note the
connections with
the interpretive
ELD standard.
K-3, 6 Prompt Progression…Tied to
Reading AND Writing Standards
• How would you
summarize the
shifts between K3rd grades?
• Examine the
connection to the
prompt verbiage
at each grade
level.
Whole Group Debrief
• If you were planning a
school-wide writing event
and/or year-long writing
plan, how might you use a
resource like this with your
staff?
• What else would you need
to support your schoolwide writing efforts?
Deconstructing 2nd Grade Prompt – “I
Do”
Materials Needed:
• Prompt Handout
• 3 Different Colors
of Highlighters
Deconstruction of the Prompt
Directions:
Write a paragraph that
tells Pink Crayon’s point of
view. Use evidence from
the letter and the
illustrations to support
your description of Pink
Crayon’s point of view.
Explain how the text and
illustrations you used
support your idea about
Pink Crayon.
(bullets not included)
Deconstruction of the Prompt
Directions:
Write a paragraph that
tells Pink Crayon’s point of
view. Use evidence from
the letter and the
illustrations to support
your description of Pink
Crayon’s point of view.
Explain how the text and
illustrations you used
support your idea about
Pink Crayon.
GREEN = Sentence
telling the main
topic to address
(topic
sentence/thesis
statement)
Deconstruction of the Prompt
Directions:
Write a paragraph that
tells Pink Crayon’s point of
view. Use evidence from
the letter and the
illustrations to support
your description of Pink
Crayon’s point of view.
Explain how the text and
illustrations you used
support your idea about
Pink Crayon.
YELLOW =
Sentence asking
students for text
evidence (“found” in
text/source)
Deconstruction of the Prompt
Directions:
Write a paragraph that
tells Pink Crayon’s point of
view. Use evidence from
the letter and the
illustrations to support
your description of Pink
Crayon’s point of view.
Explain how the text and
illustrations you used
support your idea about
Pink Crayon.
PINK = Sentence
asking student to
explain connection
between evidence
and topic
sentence/thesis
(student inference/
thinking)
Application
Connecting Prompt with Graphic
Organizer
Directions:
Write a paragraph that
tells Pink Crayon’s point
of view. Use evidence
from the letter and the
illustrations to support
your description of Pink
Crayon’s point of view.
Explain how the text and
illustrations you used
support your idea about
Pink Crayon.
Teacher Modeling Note
• Text structure of The Day the Crayons Quit
allows for repeated modeling of writing task
using different crayons (“I do,” “We do
together,” “You do together”).
• In other writing situations, clone the prompt,
use with different texts previously read in
order to model and practice before
“releasing” students to independently write.
Identifying Topic/Topic Sentence
The topic sentence
• introduces the main
idea of the
paragraph.
• can often be crafted
using prompt
language.
• can have the same
structure as a thesis
statement.
Topic/Topic Sentence – Pink Crayon
Pink Crayon’s point of view is
that he is not used enough because Duncan
thinks he is a girls’ color.
PROMPT: Write a paragraph that tells Pink
Crayon’s point of view…
Reading/Writing Connection
Consider how the sample
TDQs listed on the
Analyzing Text Complexity
handout prepared students
to be able to write a topic
sentence like this—
especially looking at the RL
2 and RL 6 example
questions.
Gathering Text/Illustration Evidence
Evidence
• is “found” (e.g., put
your finger on it;
show me where…).
• can be text,
illustrations, multimedia, and/or text
features.
Looking for Text Evidence – “I do”
• Pink Crayon capitalized
the words LISTEN
HERE, KID, ONCE,
GIRLS’, and PLEASE
Looking for Text Evidence –
“You do together”
• Pink Crayon capitalized
the words LISTEN
HERE, KID, ONCE,
GIRLS’, and PLEASE
Looking for Illustration Evidence –
“I do”
• There is a pink
dinosaur with
sharp teeth.
Looking for Illustration Evidence –
“You do together”
• There is a pink
dinosaur with
sharp teeth.
Rigorous Reading p. 130
In addition, when students respond to a specific
writing prompt that requires that they use
evidence from the text, the task becomes text
dependent. However, it’s not sufficient for
student to simply include quotes from the text.
They need to explain the quotes and integrate
them in a thoughtful way. As Graff and
Birkenstein (2006) note, “[T]he main problem
with quotation arises when writers assume that
the quotations speak for themselves” (p. 40).
Explaining Evidence
Explanations
• Connect evidence to
main idea, topic
sentence, or opinion
• Are NOT
restatements or
paraphrases of
evidence.
• Come from student
inference and critical
thinking.
Explaining Evidence
Importance for “explanation” is to connect the
evidence to the topic sentence/main idea or
opinion.
Pink Crayon’s point of view is that he is not used
enough because Duncan thinks he is a girls’ color.
Explaining Evidence – “I do”
Pink Crayon’s point of view is that he is not used
enough because Duncan thinks he is a girls’ color.
• Capitalized words are
Pink Crayon
important.
capitalized the words
• Pink Crayon wants
LISTEN HERE, KID,
Duncan
to
listen
and
ONCE, GIRLS’, and
not think of him as a
PLEASE
girls’ crayon.
Explaining Evidence – “I do”
Pink Crayon’s point of view is that he is not used
enough because Duncan thinks he is a girls’ color.
There is a pink
dinosaur with sharp
teeth.
• Pink dinosaurs can
be scary.
• Pink is not just for
princess dresses.
Explaining Evidence –
“You do together”
Pink Crayon’s point of view is that he is not used
enough because Duncan thinks he is a girls’ color.
Pink Crayon drew a
pink dinosaur,
monster, and
cowboy.
?
Table/Whole Group Debrief of G.O.
• How did the activity and information
presented validate, revise, or add to your
understanding of writing instruction?
• How might you use anything learned today
about instructing writing and the contents of
CCSS Collaborative Learning workshops to
determine your next steps as a site leader?
Graphic Organizer Rhetorical Writing
Sample Paragraph – Identifying “Jobs”
of Sentences
Which number
sentence(s) does the job
of a topic sentence?
#1
Sample Paragraph – Identifying “Jobs”
of Sentences
Which number
sentence(s) does the job
of showing evidence?
#2, #5
Sample Paragraph – Identifying “Jobs”
of Sentences
Which number
sentence(s) does the job
of giving an explanation
of the evidence?
#3, #4,
#6
Using Rubrics for/of Learning
Additional Possible Resources
Modeling
Writing Terminology
SUTW
Table Debrief
• How did the activities
and information
presented connect to
the ELD modes of
communication? Highquality, first time
instruction?
• What are your next
steps as a site leader?
1
Exchanging information and ideas with
others through oral collaborative
conversations on a range of social and
academic topics.
3
Offering and supporting opinions and
negotiating with others in communicative
exchanges.
5
Listening actively to spoken English in a
range of social and academic contexts.
6
Reading closely literary and informational
texts and viewing multimedia to
determine how meaning is conveyed
explicitly and implicitly through language
9
Expressing information and ideas in
formal oral presentations on academic
topics.
Supporting own opinions and evaluating
11 others’ opinions in speaking and writing.
Miscellaneous Admin Info RE
K/1st Writing Benchmarks
NEXT TIME:
• Explain holistic score for K/1st benchmark writing
assessments (how to use and how not to use)
• Holistic vs. analytic; how to end up with a score
• Please BRING
WRITING SAMPLES
st
(preferably K/1 benchmark)
Organization: 1 Unit, 3 Cycles, 5 Lessons
Each Unit has a:
Reading Focus: Literature or Informational Text
Writing Focus: Narrative, Inform/Explanatory, or Opinion/Argument
CYCLE 1
CYCLE 2
CYCLE 3
Reading
Reading
Reading
Language
Language
Language
Writing
Writing
Writing
Speaking and Listening
Speaking and Listening
Speaking and Listening
Foundational Skills
Foundational Skills
Foundational Skills
Login to Site
URL: egusd.thesyncedsolution.com
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username
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password
Adding a Class
• Before being provided
access to the resource,
teachers must add a
class.
• Follow the directions
on the following
screen. (They are also
on the yellow, tutorial
handout.)
How to add classes in The Synced Solution
1) Click add/edit classes
2) Click add class
3) Select Subject Area
(ELA/Math)
4) Select Grade Level from
drop down menu
5) Select Course Plan from
drop down menu
6) Decide what you want to
name the class and type in
the Class field
7) Click save and that will
add the course, if you want to add another follow 1-6
Note: Users can place classes in any order they wish by using the arrows on the left side of the page. When
done with adding classes, click save and close to see classes on the Home page
Support to Find Key Resources
Reflection – Feedback Form
Since your
feedback helps
drive our
professional
learning decisionmaking, we
appreciate your
reflective
comments!

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