english 10 week 3 do nows 4th qr - homeworkchs

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10I2 JULIUS CAESAR
ENGLISH 10: DO NOW 4/29/13

Respond: have you ever read anything from
William Shakespeare? If so, what? What do you
know about him or his writing? What do you
predict might be a problem for you while reading
Julius Caesar?
ENGLISH 10 DO NOW: 4/30/13

Put the following sayings into your own words:
What gaulding and fooling is this?
 Be of good cheer
 I care not a groat
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4/30/13
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Today we will work with some of the themes in
Julius Caeser by creating some short skits.
(Today starts your participation grade for
willingness to participate: whether a small role or
a big one)
After our skits, I am going to survey your
opinions about some issues that will be occurring
in the play too.
Using the images above make a
prediction about the role of Brutus
in the play… Also add info you
already know about Julius Caesar
English 10 Do Now 5-2-13
What is the difference between a
“sole” and a “soul”? What is a
cobbler?
TEXTBOOKS TODAY and forever!
THE ROMAN EMPIRE

Caesar and Pompey were great friends
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Pompey had married Caesar’s daughter
These 2 guys helped bring order to Rome’s
weakening government
They set up what was called “The First
Triumvirate” (3 man governing body)
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The third guy was Crassus
Power of Rome and several provinces was not
enough for these three, so Caesar left for what
is now called The Gallic Wars…
THE GALLIC WARS
For 8 years, Caesar roamed through Europe,
taking over parts of France, Belgium, Holland,
Germany, and Switzerland.
 Caesar amassed enormous sums of money, and
he sent the dinare back to Rome, winning over
the hearts of the people.
 In 49 BC, Pompey was fed up with Caesar’s
power and the people’s love for him, so he joined
sides with the Senate.

 According
to his enemies, Caesar
robbed the Roman public of its liberty
and self-respect, since he won their
favor with money
Pompey and the Senate (C’s enemies)
ordered that Caesar give up his command
 Caesar refused, charged into Rome and
chased Pompey all the way to Egypt.
 Pompey was murdered before Caesar got a
chance to take revenge

 Caesar
spent time in Egypt with
Cleopatra
 After this, Caesar went to Spain and
crushed Pompey’s son’s army.
 When Caesar got back, he was
absolutely invincible. He was declared
dictator, and he appointed his friends
to the Senate.
 He grew so arrogant that he built a
statue of himself titled “To the
Unconquerable God.”
AND NOW WE BEGIN OUR STORY…
Bring thy books
everyday,
lest thy desire
detentions!
What role
might a
character
like the
ones to
the left
have in
this play?
A soothsayer is a person who
claims to speak sooth:
specifically, one who predicts
the future or claims to know
secrets or other hidden
knowledge based on personal,
political, spiritual or religious
beliefs rather than scientific
principles.
They are often depicted as blind,
at least in one eye, and almost
always are ragged - things like
fortune telling having been a
common trade of the poor and
disabled, and other societal
outcasts.
FRIENDS
1. Calphurnia, his wife
5. The people of Rome!!
3. Octavius, his nephew and
adopted son
2. Mark Antony, his friend
and advisor
4. Brutus, noblest of Romans
FOES
2. Tribunes Flavius and Marullus
1. The Roman Senate
3. Cassius, a jealous patrician and
friend of Brutus
4. Other patricians we will meet who will conspire against Caesar
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564-1616)

By the time he wrote
Julius Caesar, in 1599
he may have already
completed seven
comedies, nine
histories, and two
tragedies.
JULIUS CAESAR
 Though
the play is
a tragedy and not a
history, it is one of
many plays that
Shakespeare based
on true events
from history.
 The play involves a
conspiracy against
Caesar, his
murder, and the
aftermath.
•Despite the title and
Shakespeare’s usual habit
of naming his tragedies
after the protagonist,
Caesar is NOT the
protagonist of the play.
THE PLAY IS SET!
 The
play begins
soon after Caesar is
named dictator.
 Remember, Rome is
supposed to be a
republic!
 Some Romans were
not happy with the
arrangement.
Roman Theatre
ENGLISH 10: DO NOW 5-3-13
Open textbook to Act I to help with Do Now
 Check your study guide question list. Which
questions can we already answer?
 What does Caesar’s request in lines 6-8 say about
his character?
 What does Antony’s words in lines 9-10 say about
his character?
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6th pd: Granberry: What does the comment about
flying too high mean?
ENGLISH 10 5-3-13
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Pay Attention to the dynamic between Brutus
and Cassius (aka what kind of relationship they
seem to have.) We are looking for moments
where we can INFER their character types.
When reading, have out textbook, modern version
packet, study ?s, Character notes organizer

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