Unpacking the Standards Presentation

Report
Unpacking
the
Standards
Bedford County Public Schools
2013-2014
Why are we here?
• Increased Rigor of the Standards
• Academic Review Findings
Increased Rigor of the SOLs
THEN
NOW
Increased Rigor of the
SOLs
Outcomes of the Academic Review Process
Process focused on the Alignment of the
Written----- Instructed---- Assessed
Curriculum
5
Main Question: Does the cognitive
level present in each (written,
instructed, and assessed
curriculum) match the intent of
the standard?
Written Curriculum
Instructed Curriculum
Assessed Curriculum
----------------- RIGOR OF CURRENT STANDARDS -------------------
Written Curriculum
Instructed Curriculum
Assessed Curriculum
----------------- RIGOR OF FORMER STANDARDS -------------------
Tell your partner about a time
when you experienced a
misalignment
as a teacher
OR
as a student
What was the effect?
Objective for Today: To align cognitive levels of instruction and
assessment with the Essential Understandings, Knowledge and
Skills of the Standards of Learning.
Objectives
Today I will identify the cognitive levels within the Curriculum
Framework…
so that I can develop units, lessons, and assessments that
appropriately match the cognitive levels.
I’ll know I have it when my students exhibit success at the
appropriate level of rigor intended by the Standards of Learning.
Unpacking the
Standards
When we unpack a standard in
order to plan our Written and
Taught Curricula, we should
use both the Standards of
Learning and the Curriculum
Framework.
Virginia Mathematics Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework 2009
Introduction
The 2009 Mathematics Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework is a companion
document to the 2009 Mathematics Standards of Learning and amplifies the
Mathematics Standards of Learning by defining the content knowledge, skills, and
understandings that are measured by the Standards of Learning assessments. The
Curriculum Framework provides additional guidance to school divisions and their
teachers as they develop an instructional program appropriate for their students. It
assists teachers in their lesson planning by identifying essential understandings, defining
essential content knowledge, and describing the intellectual skills students need to use.
This supplemental framework delineates in greater specificity the content that all
teachers should teach and all students should learn.
Process
Consider Context
Identify Content
Determine
Cognitive Level
Unpacking the
Standards
Consider the overarching
standard or strand in order to
determine the CONTEXT – the
Big Picture.
How does it relate to previous learning
(curricular connections and/or prerequisite
skills)?
How does it build to future learning?
Are there essential questions to be answered?
Looking for
Context
Math Standard of Learning
Example
3.11
The student will
a) tell time to the nearest minute, using
analog and digital clocks; and
b) determine elapsed time in one-hour
increments over a 12-hour period.
K.9
1.8
2.12
3.11
4.9
5.10
• The student will tell time to the hour using analog and digital clocks
• The student will tell time to the half-hour, using analog and digital clocks.
• The student will tell and write time to the nearest five minutes, using analog and digital
clocks.
• The student will
• a)
tell time to the nearest minute, using analog and digital clocks; and
• b)
determine elapsed time in one-hour increments over a 12-hour period.
• The student will determine elapsed time in hours and minutes within a 12-hour period.
• The student will determine an amount of elapsed time in hours and minutes within a 24hour period.
Looking for
Context
English Standard of Learning
Example
English 3.4
The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
a) Use knowledge of homophones.
b) Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms.
c) Apply meaning clues, language structure, and phonetic
strategies.
d) Use context to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words.
e) Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by
listening and reading a variety of
texts.
f) Use vocabulary from other content areas.
g) Use word reference resources including the glossary,
dictionary, and thesaurus.
K.8
•The student will expand vocabulary.
•a) Discuss meanings of words.
•b) Develop vocabulary by listening to a variety of texts read aloud.
1.8
•The student will expand vocabulary.
•a) Discuss meanings of words in context.
•b) Develop vocabulary by listening to and reading a variety of texts.
•c) Ask for the meaning of unknown words and make connections to familiar words.
•d) Use text clues such as words or pictures to discern meanings of unknown words.
•e) Use vocabulary from other content areas.
2.7
•The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
•a) Use knowledge of homophones.
•b) Use knowledge of prefixes and suffixes.
•c) Use knowledge of antonyms and synonyms.
•d) Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by listening and reading a variety of
•texts.
3.4
•The student will expand vocabulary when reading.
•a) Use knowledge of homophones.
•b) Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms.
•c) Apply meaning clues, language structure, and phonetic strategies.
•d) Use context to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words.
•e) Discuss meanings of words and develop vocabulary by listening and reading a variety of texts.
•f) Use vocabulary from other content areas.
•g) Use word reference resources including the glossary, dictionary, and thesaurus.
Unpacking the
Standard
Determine the CONTENT what students must know
The second and third columns of the
framework (essential understandings, skills,
knowledge and processes must be consulted
to ensure that all content is identified.
Content: What we want students to Know (Facts)

Vocabulary

Critical details

Terminology

Important events and people

Definitions

Sequence and timelines

Key factual information

Formulas
Virginia Mathematics Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework 2009
Introduction (5th grade example)
Essential Understandings (2nd column)
This section delineates the key concepts, ideas and mathematical relationships that all
students should grasp to demonstrate an understanding of the Standards of Learning. In
Grades 6-8, these essential understandings are presented as questions to facilitate
teacher planning.
Essential Knowledge and Skills (3rd column)
Each standard is expanded in the Essential Knowledge and Skills column. What each
student should know and be able to do in each standard is outlined. This is not meant to
be an exhaustive list nor a list that limits what is taught in the classroom. It is meant to
be the key knowledge and skills that define the standard.
Unpacking the
Standard
Identify the COGNITIVE
LEVEL - What must students
be able to do with the content?
Identify the verb
Analyze for Bloom’s Taxonomy/ Webb’s
Depth of Knowledge
Bloom’s Taxonomy
Task
Use the Essential Knowledge and Skills
column of the Curriculum Framework for
each standard to:
1. Underline the content
2. Circle the verb
3. Mark any essential questions or big
ideas
Example: Unpacking a Standard
For the learning objective, underline the
content, circle the word(s) that provide
information regarding cognitive level, and
finally, classify the word into Bloom’s/Webb’s
levels.
Standard = Context
4.4 The student will
a) estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of
whole numbers;
d) solve single-step and multistep addition, subtraction,
and multiplication problems with whole numbers.
• Verify the reasonableness of sums, differences, products, and
quotients of whole numbers using estimation.
Essential Knowledge,
Skills, and Processes
Example: Unpacking a Standard
For the learning objective, underline the
content, circle the word(s) that provide
information regarding cognitive level, and
finally, classify the word into Bloom’s/Webb’s
levels.
Apply
Apply
4.4 The student will
a) estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of
whole numbers;
d) solve single-step and multistep addition, subtraction,
and multiplication problems with whole numbers.
• Verify the reasonableness of sums, differences, products, and
quotients of whole numbers using estimation.
Example: Unpacking a Standard
For the learning objective, underline the
content, circle the word(s) that provide
information regarding cognitive level, and
finally, classify the word into Bloom’s/Webb’s
levels.
Standard = Context
4.4 The student will
a) estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of
whole numbers;
d) solve single-step and multistep addition, subtraction,
and multiplication problems with whole numbers.
• Verify the reasonableness of sums, differences, products, and
quotients of whole numbers using estimation.
Essential Knowledge and
Evaluate
Skill
Example: Unpacking a Standard
For the learning objective, underline the
content, circle the word(s) that provide
information regarding cognitive level, and
finally, classify the word into Bloom’s/Webb’s
levels.
Standard = Context
6.2
The student will investigate and understand basic sources of
energy, their origins, transformations, and uses. Key concepts
include
a) potential and kinetic energy
• compare and contrast potential and kinetic energy through
common examples found in the natural environment.
Essential Knowledge,
Skills, and Processes
Example: Unpacking a Standard
For the learning objective, underline the
content, circle the word(s) that provide
information regarding cognitive level, and
finally, classify the word into Bloom’s/Webb’s
levels.
Many levels
6.2
The student will investigate and understand basic sources of
energy, their origins, transformations, and uses. Key concepts
include
a) potential and kinetic energy
Analyze
• compare and contrast potential and kinetic energy through
common examples found in the natural environment.
Don’t Forget Essential
Questions and
Big Ideas!
• Broad in scope
• Not easily answered in one sentencemeant to be discussed
• Might be controversial or pose a dilemma
• Requires reasoning and justification
• Sparks more questions
• Important questions that recur throughout
all our lives- K-12 and beyond
• A tool for organizing purpose; for making
student learning meaningful and
connected.
Big Ideas in HISTORY
What we want students to be able to REMEMBER
(Understandings):





The ancient Egyptians farmed and irrigated the land near the
Nile River.
The ancient Chinese settled along the Huang He. They fished,
farmed, and irrigated the land.
The Powhatan farmed, fished, hunted, used trees for homes and
canoes, and gathered plants for food.
The Lakota moved around the region to hunt for buffalo. They
later used horses for transportation.
The Pueblo people farmed the land. They lived in villages in
houses made of adobe (clay).
2nd grade
Big Idea (The UNDERSTANDING)
People relate to their environment in different ways.
Big Ideas in ENGLISH
What we want students to be able to REMEMBER and DO
(Understandings):

Explain the author’s purpose (e.g., to entertain, inform, or
persuade)

Describe how the choice of language, setting, characters, details,
and other information contribute to the author’s purpose.

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event drawing on
specific details from the text (e.g., words, actions, or a
character’s thoughts).
(4th grade)
Big Idea (The UNDERSTANDING)
Authors craft their purpose and message by the
choice of language, setting, characters, and specific
information.
Big Ideas in MATH
What we want students to be able to REMEMBER and DO
(Understandings):


Represent a number in fraction, decimal, and percent forms.
Compare, order, and determine equivalent relationships among
fractions, decimals, and percents.
7th Grade
Essential Question/Big Idea (The UNDERSTANDING)
How are fractions, decimals, and percents related?
Consider the standards you will be teaching over the next few weeks.
Use that portion of the framework to spend
the next few minutes to identify the content
(underline).
Then determine the cognitive level (circle
the verbs and compare with
Bloom’s/Webb’s).
Be sure to mark any essential questions or
big ideas (context).
Reflect on the process
Discuss with your group
I’VE UNPACKED THE STANDARDS…
NOW WHAT?
Thinking Maps Sort
Work with partners to sort your cards.
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Map
Name
Key Words for Thinking
Traditional Curriculum Planning
Textbook
Cover
Required
Material
Activities
Assessment
• It often begins with a really interesting book
or topic, teachers then decide on if it matches
the curriculum map. Then the activity is
determined to use so students become
engaged. Finally, the teacher writes an
assessment that may or may not fit the
previous lessons or desired SOL.
Design
Backwards
Backwards
Planning
Determine
the essential
questions
and big
ideas – the
3 Cs
Decide how
students will
provide
evidence of
their learning
Build
Summative
Assessment
Context
Content
Cognitive Level
What cognitive
level/thinking
skills/verbs are
required?
Align to
Curriculum
Framework and
Test Blueprint
Create Daily
Instructional
Schedule
Consult pacing guide
and use a calendar to
map backwards from
your target date.
Consider
resources and
complete Unit
Plan Overview
Consider the summative
assessment in order to
include the best evidence
of student learning
Design
Learning
Experiences:
Choose the
Strategies
Create the
activities to
scaffold learning.
Plan for Daily
Tiered
Instruction and
Formative
Assessments
Include multiple and
varied Checks for
Understanding and
student-friendly
objectives
Determine
the essential
questions
and big
ideas – the
3 Cs
What essential questions or understandings will guide
this unit and focus teaching/learning? (Context)
What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as
a result of this unit? (Content)
What depth of knowledge is required? (Cognitive
Level)
What are Essential
Questions and
Big Ideas?
• Broad in scope
• Not easily answered in one sentencemeant to be discussed
• Might be controversial or pose a dilemma
• Requires reasoning and justification
• Sparks more questions
• Important questions that recur throughout
all our lives- K-12 and beyond
• A tool for organizing purpose; for making
student learning meaningful and
connected.
Decide how
students will
provide
evidence of
their learning
Determine Acceptable Evidence
•
•
•
•
•
•
Performance Tasks and Projects
Informal Checks/Observations
Quizzes and Tests
Reflections or Essays
Portfolios
Self-assessment
Other Considerations
 How can technology be used to facilitate formative
and summative assessments?
 How will the data be used to inform future
instructions?
Build
Summative
Assessment
This worksheet is
available at
Planning Rigorous Assessments
• What kind of thinking is implied by the standards or
objectives?
• What key concepts should students understand by the end
of this unit?
• How should students be able to use these concepts?
• What will students who have mastered these concepts be
able to do?
• What learning tasks will best help students demonstrate
mastery of these concepts?
• What does mastery of the identified learning tasks look
like?
• What is the mastery threshold?
• What feedback methods will tell students if they have
reached the mastery threshold and how can they continue
to improve?
Design Learning
Experiences:
Choose the
Strategies
What sequence of teaching and learning experiences will equip
students to develop and demonstrate the desired understandings?
Considerations:
Are there specific scaffolds that may be needed?
Are there certain texts and resources required?
Are there some Thinking Maps that can help achieve these goals?
Are there CRISS strategies that can help achieve these goals?
Create Daily
Instructional
Schedule
Consult pacing guide and use a calendar
to map backwards from your target date.
LESSON PLANNING SEQUENCE FOR
TEACHING 3RD GRADE STANDARD –
EQUIVALENT FRACTIONS
Consider
resources and
complete Unit
Plan Overview
Consider the summative assessment in
order to include the best evidence of
student learning
Consider the resources that will best meet
the specific needs of ALL your learners
Plan for Daily
Tiered
Instruction and
Formative
Assessments
Include multiple and varied
Checks for Understanding
•
Research for Better Teaching Site – contains a video of classroom
examples and strategies to check for understanding.
http://www.rbteach.com/rbteach2/Flash/VideoPlayer/Streamer/Checking/checkin
g_video.asp
•
Listing of Checking for Understanding strategies
http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/file/view/strategies.pdf
•
Checking for Understanding Techniques and Resources
http://www.gips.org/quick-links/checking-for-understanding
•
Springboard Strategies to Check for Understanding Handout
http://daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com/file/view/SB_eNewsNov_Chart.pdf
You know your unit is
rigorous when…
This checklist is available at
You know your unit is
rigorous when…
Plan for Daily
Tiered
Instruction and
Formative
Assessments
Include Student-Friendly Objectives
Developing
Student Goals
Defining and communicating the
behaviors that lead to mastery
Developing student goals is done in
conjunction with . . .
• Unpacking the standards
• Backwards planning
• Determining what student behavior(s) will
demonstrate mastery
Purpose of effectively communicating student
goals
• The process of developing students goals helps
us to refine our curriculum
• Communicating student goals gives the
students the tools they need to manage their
efforts and take ownership of their own
learning
• Posting student goals provides meaningful
organization and structure to our classrooms
and programs
Unpacking Example:
English 6.5
c.) Describe how word choice and imagery
contribute to the meaning of a text.
• Describing the contribution to the meaning – is
the required cognitive skill.
• Content – word choice and imagery.
• Context – a vertical review of the curriculum
shows a progression of identifying figurative
language to understanding how its use impacts
meaning and therefore, author’s purpose
Backwards Planning Example:
English 6.5
c.) Describe how word choice and imagery
contribute to the meaning of a text.
• Let’s assume that after our backwards
planning, we are at the point of teaching
students to describe, in their own words, how
imagery contributed to the meaning of a text.
We’ve probably had a previous lesson(s) in
identifying imagery and discussing it’s
purpose.
Determine Student Behavior
Example:
English 6.5
c.) Describe how word choice and imagery
contribute to the meaning of a text.
• We’ve determined that in order to
demonstrate mastery of this standard/bullet,
the student should be able to describe
verbally and in writing, how the authors use
of words contributed to the meaning of a
given text
Today’s Lesson
Students work in small groups.
Use poem or prose example (i.e., Carl Sandburg’s
“Fog”)
Groups will contribute to incomplete Bubble Maps or
Multi-Flow Maps
Using the Thinking Maps as a reference, students will
individually write a paragraph describing how the
author’s use of imagery contributed to the meaning of
the text.
Let’s communicate our goals for
today to our students
•
•
•
•
Objective
Today I will . . .
So that I can . . .
I’ll know that I have it when . . .
Objective
In student language, tell the learning objective.
Example:
Describe how an author chooses certain words
to create an image in the mind of the reader
Today I will . . .
Tell the student what they will be doing in class
today – what activities have you planned?
Example:
Work with other students in small groups to
complete Thinking Maps about the poem, “Fog”
content
So that I can . . .
What’s the bigger picture? What and why is this
learning important?
Example:
better understand and comprehend poetry.
context
I’ll know I have it when . . .
What is the product or behavior that will show the
student has demonstrated what the teacher hopes to
accomplish with today’s lesson
Example:
Write a paragraph describing how and why Carl
Sandburg’s chose to use certain words in “Fog.”
cognitive
Posted Goal Chart
Objective
Describe how an author
chooses certain words
to create an image in the
mind of the reader
Today I will . . .
Work with other students in
small groups to complete
Thinking Maps about the
poem, “Fog”
So that I can . . .
Better understand and
comprehend poetry
I’ll know I have it when . . .
I can write a paragraph
describing how and why
Carl Sandburg’s chose to
use certain words in the
poem “Fog.”

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