Level 1

Report
Quickwrite
• How did you learn
the skill of note
taking?
• How did this skill
contribute to your
success?
• Cornell note taking stimulates
critical thinking skills.
• Note taking helps students
remember what is said in class.
• A good set of notes can help
students work on assignments
and prepare for tests outside of
the classroom.
• Good notes allow students to help
each other problem solve.
• Good Notes help students organize
and process data and information.
• Helps student recall by
getting them to process
their notes 3 times.
• Writing is a great tool for learning!
• Developed in 1949 at Cornell
University by Walter Pauk.
• Designed in response to frustration
over student test scores.
• Meant to be easily used
as a test study guide.
• Adopted by most major law schools
as the preferred note taking method.
• Mastering information, not just
recording facts
• Efficient
• Each step prepares the way for
the next part of the learning
process
1. Fill in heading
2. Record notes on the
right
•
Within 8 hours, read
over notes to fill in
gaps
3. Write High Level
Questions on the left
4. Write a summary at the
bottom of page.
5. Review: cover main
column and answer ?’s
• User-defined
organization
• Records info
efficiently and
selectively
• Interaction dependent
on system
• May be reviewed
periodically
• Optional revision
• 3-part organization
• Creates schemata
• Creates higher-level
thinking questions
• Creates summaries
• Review & revise notes
Uses as study guides
• Holds students
accountable for their
learning
Anthropods
• How do the
ticks find the
cattle?
• Why don’t the
ticks usually
kill their host?
• How could
tick
infestations in
cattle impact
humans?
(Diagram copied
during lecture)
Questions should reflect:
• Info the student doesn’t
understand or wants to
discuss with the teacher
• Information that may appear
on a test
• Gaps in the notes
• Factual Questions: Level 1
– 1 correct answer
– Answered by pointing to the text
• How does “The Road Not Taken” begin? (recite)
• Interpretive Questions: Level 2
– More than one reasonable answer
– Supported with evidence from the text
• In “The Bet” by Chekhov, how do the lawyer and the
banker differ in their attitudes toward punishment?
(compare/contrast)
• Evaluative/Universal Questions: Level 3
– Abstract and does not pertain to the text
– Ask that judgments be made from information
– Give opinions about issues, judge the validity of ideas and
justify opinions and ideas.
• In Catcher in the Rye, how might Phoebe, years later,
describe Holden to her children? (speculation)
Evaluate
Generalize
Imagine
Judge
Predict
Speculate
Output
Applying
Compare
Contrast
Classify
Sort
Distinguish
Explain (Why)
Infer
Process
Complete
Count
Define
Describe
Identify
List
Make Meaning
Input
Gathering
Recall
By asking higher
levels of questions,
students deepen
their knowledge
and create
connections to the
material being
presented which
becomes the basis
for the inquiry that
is necessary during
tutorials.
One-Two-Three Story Intellect Poem
There are one-story intellects,
two-story intellects,
and three-story intellects with skylights.
All fact collectors who have
no aim beyond their facts
are one-story people.
Two-story people compare, reason,
generalize, using the labor of
fact collectors as their own.
Three-story people idealize,
imagine, predict – their best illumination
comes through the skylight.
-Adapted from Oliver Wendall Holmes
• How do we teach students to conduct
inquiry at higher levels?
• Model progressively more difficult inquiry practices
• Levels differ by:
– Teacher/material guidance decreases
as levels increase
– Student independence increases as
levels increase
– Intellectual processes are higher as
levels increase
Write corresponding higher and lower level
questions for each of the following:
Level One
Level Two
Level Three
Topic
Name the
elements that
make up water.
Arrange the
following numbers
in order from
smallest to largest:
Create an invention
that uses at least
three types of
simple machines.
Step 1
create 3 questions about The Three Little Pigs
Step 2
identify the level of each question based on
Costa’s levels.
Step 3
rewrite the questions in order to raise the level
Evaluate
Generalize
Imagine
Judge
Predict
Speculate
Output
Applying
Compare
Contrast
Classify
Sort
Distinguish
Explain (Why)
Infer
Process
Complete
Count
Define
Describe
Identify
List
Make Meaning
Input
Gathering
Recall
1. Select an item from your purse,
pocket, etc.
2. Place the item into the paper bag
or envelope at your table.
3. Pass the bag or envelope around
and have each member of your
group select one item.
4. Write a Level 1, Level 2 and Level
3 question for the item that you
selected from the bag.
5. Share your questions in a random
order with your group.
6. The group members will decide the
level of each question shared and
the person whose item is selected
should answer the questions.
1. Region V Avid
2. Avidonline.org
3.www.phy.ilstu.edu/programs/ptefiles/
311content/inquiry/levels_of_inq
uiry.ppt

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