Jump Training: Improving power for performance and injury

Report
JUMP TRAINING: IMPROVING POWER FOR
PERFORMANCE AND INJURY PREVENTION
John P. Piper. MA, CSCS, ACSM-HFI
Performance Coach
Toppenish School District
OBJECTIVES:
Define Performance Training
Why worry about increasing jumping ability?
What part does assessment play in program design?
What are the elements of developing a training plan for increased jumping ability?
WHAT IS PERFORMANCE TRAINING
Injury-proof athletes
•
Injury proof is probably not possible, but being proactive in our approach to prevent injuries will make a
difference.
Improve work capacity (athletic fitness)
•
Athletic fitness level determines a player’s ability to have an impact in competition, so besides all the
physical benefits, possessing superior fitness gives our athletes an edge in confidence and focus.
Improve performance through athletic skill (vs. sports skill)
•
Athleticism has many factors that contribute to proficiency. In the development process, no one
component will determine success. Only a comprehensive approach will ensure consistent
development.
Help each athlete have the most positive HS experience possible.
•
Most of our athletes will never play competitively beyond HS. Performance training gives us as coaches the
opportunity to give each athlete one more tool to take with them into their adult lives.
INCREASED JUMPING ABILITY? WHY?
Increased power production (power = speed + strength)
Proactive injury prevention plan - force production and reduction (Injuries occur from
improper body control and/or fatigue)
Things to consider;
•
Think…”why are we doing this?”
•
Just making a young athlete more fit will increase sports specific jumping ability
(but consider the critical periods of development)
•
HS & MS athletes are not just mini-adults…train to their level (what about your
primary school athletes?)
•
Plan your progression…results take time
•
Assess and assess and assess (daily, weekly, seasonally)
ASSESSMENT
Vertical Jump and Horizontal Jump
Female collegiate lacrosse/basketball…
•
VJ – 16-18.5”
Female collegiate soccer
•
VJ – 19.5”
Male high school 5-star football recruits…
•
VJ – LB OL DL = 24-32”
•
VJ – DB RB QB = 29-33”
•
HJ – LB OL DL = 8’2”-8’9”
•
HJ – DB OL DL = 9’4-9’7”
What we have found…after 12 weeks of training
Frosh/Soph – 2-4” average increase
Jr/Sr - ½” -2” average increase
Male – 1-3” improvement
Female – 1-2” improvement
Assessing…
•
Vertical Jump
•
Horizontal Jump
MOVEMENT PREPARATION
(WARM UP)
Refer to progression in handout
General Warm Up (increase HR, RR, Body Temp)
•
Jump Rope
Functional Warm Up (all the above + neuromuscular)
•
Skips (front, side)
•
Bounds
•
Hops/jumps (Jumping Jacks)
Specific Warm Up (movement patterns to be used for training or performance)
P.A.S.S.
•
Hips
•
Hamstrings
•
Hip flexors
STRENGTH
•
Hips
•
Hamstrings
•
Hip Flexor
CORE (STABILITY, MOBILITY, ENDURANCE)
Powerful movement begins from the center (core) of the body
Train movements, not muscles
Athletic position – stand tall
•
Brace = bow back + tight belly button
Stability
Mobility
Planks
•
Stability – planks, side planks, superman’s
•
Mobility – planks w/ circles, side planks w/ hip raise, superman’s w/ flared arms/legs.
•
Endurance (core endurance)
Squats
•
Stability – tall posture, tail down, knees over toes
•
Mobility - progression
•
Endurance (athletic position)
Lunges
•
Stability – tall posture, lead w/ heel, knee behind toes
•
Mobility - shoulders square, chin high, toes forward
•
Endurance (hip flexor)
PREHABILITATION
Movement Patterns – what movement is most economical and efficient?
…don’t need to “feel the burn”…need to feel the pattern…again and again and again.
Repetition, repetition, repetition
Don’t count reps…move efficiently – Don’t just move, move with a purpose
•
Squats – great way to assess general movement patterns…fix them.
•
Hip mobility – hip muscular activation is an issue
•
Hip endurance – injuries don’t usually occur when the athlete is fresh…they occur
when a movement pattern breaks down. Example: ACL
POWER DEVELOPMENT
Progressive plan
Strength Training
•
Endurance, strength, power
•
Strength lifts
•
Power lifts
Plyometric Training
•
Jump technique
•
Double leg jumps
•
Single leg jumps
RECOVERY
In order for an athlete to benefit from training, there needs to be a balance between
training stress and recovery from training. – avoid soreness, malaise, feel relaxed
Recovery System
•
Nutrition – Energy, building blocks; best absorbed in “recovery window”
•
Sleep – Androgens (HGH) release during sleep cycles
•
Relaxation – time away from athletics and training (down time)
•
Recovery practices – physiologic homeostasis; take control of recovery
Relaxation/meditation
Ice/Ice baths/Contrast showers
Stretching /yoga
Massage (Foam rolls, Various ball activities, PVC rollers)
Examples of training logs in handout
SUMMARY
Assessment
Movement Prep
Core mobility and stability
Prehabilitation
Power development (endurance, strength, power)
Recovery
CONTACT INFORMATION
John P. Piper
Toppenish High School
141 Ward Road
Toppenish, Washington 98948
(Office) 509.865.8044
(Cell) 509.945.1128
[email protected]

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