The PREPARE Curriculum: An Anger Control Training Program

Report
Aggression
Replacement
Training
Karrie Miller
Cynthia L. Lloyd
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Fall 2004
Overview

Anger

Aggression Replacement Training
Desired Learner Outcomes

The teacher will be able to list the 3
components of ART and write a brief
description of each component.

The teacher will be able to list the 5 key
strategies of ACT.
Anger
Source: Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Project, (2001).
Anger…

Is not bad.

Has a function.

Can be expressed in
two ways: internal
and external.
Anger…

Responses are
learned from others.

Is one of the early
indicators of violent
behavior.
Things That Make Children
Angry






Conflict over
possessions.
Physical assault.
Verbal assault.
Rejection.
Issues of compliance.
Who knows?
If children do not receive help with
managing their anger…



Poor school
performance.
Interpersonal
conflicts.
Verbal or physical
assaults.
Aggression
Replacement
Training
Sources: Goldstein (1988), Goldstein, Glick, & Gibbs (1998)
3 Components

Skillstreaming

Anger Control
Training

Moral Reasoning
Mnemonic: SAM
Intervention Levels

Primary Intervention:
 Skillstreaming

Secondary/Tertiary
Intervention:
 Anger
Control Training
 Moral Reasoning
Skillstreaming
Skillstreaming Families






Beginning Social Skills
Advanced Social Skills
Skills for Dealing with
Feelings
Skill Alternatives to
Aggression
Skills for Dealing with
Stress
Planning Skills
Anger Control
Training
Overview of the Anger Control
Training Program (ACT)



Primarily directed toward aggressive youth, ages 12-18.
Small group (maximum 6-8 participants) meets once a
week.
Goals of ACT
 Improve social skills
 Reduce incidents of rearrest
 Enhance community functioning.
Source: Childrens Mental Health Ontario, 2001.
ACT
Weekly Topics
Basic Lesson Structure





Review of previous week's lesson.
Introduce new skill.
Discuss the new skill.
Role-play using new skill and the other
previously learned skills.
Review the new learning.
Key Components of Instruction

Modeling

Role-Playing

Performance
Feedback

Homework
Week 1: A-B-Cs of Aggressive
Behavior
(A) What led up to it?
(B) What did you do?
(C) What were the consequences?
Week 2: Introduce the Hassle
Log
Week 2: Triggers
Triggers can be external or internal.
 External:
things done by one person to
make another person angry.
 Internal:
what you think or say to yourself
when faced with an external trigger.
Week 2: Role Play
Hassle Log and Triggers
Week 3: Cues
Physical signs that you
are angry.




Muscle tension.
Pounding heart.
Knot in stomach.
Clenched fist.
Week 3: Anger Reducers

Reducer 1: Deep breathing.

Reducer 2: Backward counting.

Reducer 3: Pleasant imagery.
Week 3: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Anger Reducers
Week 4: Reminders

Reminders are statements that can be
used to help increase success in
provocative situations of all types.

During role play, reminders can be said
aloud but the goal is to be able to say it
silently.
Week 4: Reminders

Preparing for the confrontation

Impact and confrontation

Coping with arousal

Reflecting on the Provocation
Week 4: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers
Week 5: Self-Evaluation

A way for students to:
 Judge
for themselves how well they have
handled a conflict.
 Reward themselves.
 Help themselves find out how they could have
handled it better.
Week 5: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Self-evaluation
Mnemonic: Tigers Can Run And Sing.
Week 6: Thinking Ahead

Students begin to think about the
consequences of their actions.
 Short-term
consequences.
 Long-term consequences.

Students start thinking in “if-then” terms.
(Anger reducer 4).
Week 6: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Self-evaluation

Students are beginning to think about the
consequences.
Week 7: Anger Behavior Cycle

What students do to
make other people
angry.

Students list 3 things
that they do to make
others angry.
Week 7: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Self-evaluation

Students are thinking about the consequences.

Students are beginning to think about what they do to
make others angry.
Week 8: Skillstreaming Skills

Students incorporate
some of what they
have learned from
Skillstreaming
sessions.
Week 8: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Skillstreaming skill + Selfevaluation

Students are thinking about the consequences.

Students are thinking about what they do to make others
angry.
Skill #26: Using Self-Control
Home
You have been invited to a party and you
are really looking forward to it. After
school, you go home to get ready for the
party, which will be held that night. When
you enter your home, your mother says
she wants you to baby sit.
Skill #26: Using Self-Control
School or Neighborhood
You are walking through the schoolyard
one day, and a boy you don’t know very
well calls you over to him. He smiles and
says, “Hey man, I’ve got five dollars. Your
ma doing anything tonight.”
Week 9: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Skillstreaming skill + Selfevaluation

Students are thinking about the consequences.

Students are thinking about what they do to make others
angry.
Week 10: Role Play
Triggers + Cues + Reminders + Anger
Reducers + Skillstreaming skill + Selfevaluation

Students are thinking about the consequences.

Students are thinking about what they do to make others
angry.
Moral Reasoning
Moral Reasoning

Set of procedures
designed to raise a
young person’s level
of fairness, justice,
and concerns, with
the needs and rights
of others.
Program
Effectiveness
Research-Based

Based on:
 Social
learning theory.
 Structured learning.
 Systems theory.
Schools
“Researchers noted
mixed evaluation results,
but cited some positive
effects on decreasing
anger levels in response
to minor anger-provoking
situations and increasing
pro-social skills and
social skills knowledge.”
USED Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Expert
Panel, 2001
Incarcerated Youth

When competently delivered,
ART has positive outcomes in
18-month felony recidivism of
24% and a benefit to cost ratio
of $11.66.
Washington State Institute on Public Policy
Bibliography
Children’s Mental Health Ontario. (2001). Selected evidence based practices for
children and adolescents with conduct disorder: Parent training and peer group
interventions. Retrieved September 18, 2004 from
http://www.cmho.org/pdf_files/CD_W3_Peer%20Group%20Interventions.pdf
Goldstein, A. P. (1988). The prepare curriculum: Teaching prosocial competencies.
Champaign, Illinois: Research Press.
Goldstein, A. P., Glick, B. & Gibbs, J. C. (1998). Aggression replacement training: A
comprehensive intervention for youth. Champaign, Illinois: Research Press.
Roth, B. & Striepling-Goldstein, S. (2003). School-based aggression replacement
training. Reclaiming children and youth, 12 (3), 138-141. Retrieved September 30,
2004 from EBSCO database.
Bibliography (cont.)
Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Project. (2001). SDDFS Notes, 4 (3).
Retrieved September 18, 2004 from University of North Florida, Florida Institute of
Education web site: http://www.unf.edu/dept/fie/sdfs/notes/anger.pdf
United States Department of Education Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Expert
Panel. (2001). Exemplary and promising safe, disciplines, and drug-free schools
programs 2001. Retrieved October 15, 2004 from
http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/exemplary01/exemplary01.pdf
Washington State Institute for Public Policy. (2004). Outcome evaluation of Washington
state’s research-based programs for juvenile offenders. Retrieved October 15, 2004
from http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/

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