Oct 10

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Objectives: Students will 1. read and discuss irony in Act Three in The Crucible
Bell-ringer:
1. What is irony? Do you know the difference
between verbal irony, situational irony, and
dramatic irony?
Objectives: Students will 1. read and discuss irony in Act Three in The Crucible
Agenda:
1. Bell-ringer (review)
2. Lingering questions addressed
3. Read and discuss irony in Act 3
4. Exit Ticket/Homework
Objectives: Students will 1. read and discuss irony in Act Three in The Crucible
What is irony?
Situational Irony: when the outcome of a situation
is inconsistent with what we expect would
logically or normally occur.
Dramatic Irony: what the audience or reader is
aware of something that a character does not
know.
Verbal Irony: when a speaker or writer says one
thing but actually means the opposite. Sarcasm
is one type of verbal irony.
Objectives: Students will 1. read and discuss irony in Act Three in The Crucible
Answer the following questions with your group:
What was John’s intention in publicly admitting his affair
with Abigail? How is this ironic? What type of irony is
this?
2. What was Elizabeth’s intention when lying about John’s
affair? What is ironic about Elizabeth’s lie? What type of
irony is this?
3. What is ironic about the beliefs of the Puritan
community and the events of the play so far?
1.
BONUS: list two additional examples of irony from the text
and explain what type of irony for each example.
Objectives: Students will 1. read and discuss irony in Act Three in The Crucible
Exit Ticket: Do you have any lingering questions
about Act 3? (on post-it)
Homework:
1. Read Act 3 comprehension check questions for
Friday
2. Complete the Acts 2 and 3 vocabulary for Friday.
3. Assessment Day: Act 1-3 quiz, Act 2 and 3
vocabulary quiz, and Irregular Verb quiz

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