English Language Arts - Henderson County Public Schools

Report
English
Language Arts
6th-8th grade
Angie Eudy
Lisa Rogers
7/20/2015
What reading used to look like
for your child…..
How to Bartle Puzballs
There are tork gooboos of puzballs,
including laplies, mushos, and fushos.
Even if you bartle the puzballs that tovo
inny and onny of the perm, they do not
grunto any lipples. In order to geemee a
puzball that gruntos lipples, you should
bartle the fusho who has rarckled the
parshtootoos after her humply fluflu.
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Questions and Answers:
1) How many gooboos of puzballs are there?
• There are tork gooboos of puzballs.
2) What are laplies, mushos, and fushos?
• Laplies, mushos, and fushos are tork gooboos of
puzballs.
3) Even if you bartle the puzballs that tovo inny and onny
of the pern, they will not what?
• They will not grunto any lipples.
4) How can you geemee a puzball that gruntos lipples?
• You should bartle the fusho who has rarckled her
parshtootoos after her humply fluflu.
7/20/2015
The Three Shifts
What the Parent does…
•Encourage your child to read more non-fiction books and articles
•Talk about topics and books that your child is reading
•Ask questions about what your child is reading and relate real-world
events to reading
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The Three Shifts
What the Parent does…
•Talk about text
• Demand evidence in every day discussions/disagreements
• Read aloud or read the same book and discuss with evidence
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The Three Shifts
What the Parent does…
•Encourage your child to read challenging books
•Talk about topics and books with academic words
•Ask questions about what your child is reading
7/20/2015
Reading Literature
5th grade
6th grade
7th grade
8th grade
9th grade
• Students determine
the theme of a
story, play, or poem
from details in
the text, including how
characters
respond to challenges
or how the
speaker in a poem
reflects upon a
topic, and summarize
the text.
• Students describe
how a narrator’s
or speaker’s point of
view influences
how events are
described.
• Students determine
the theme or central
idea of a text and how
it is conveyed through
particular details.
Students also provide
a summary of the text
without personal
opinions or
judgments.
• Students determine
a theme or central
idea of a text and
analyze its
development over the
course of the text.
Students also provide
an objective summary
of the text.
• Students determine
a theme or central
idea of a text and
analyze its
development over the
course of the text,
including its
relationship to the
characters, setting,
and plot. Students
also provide an
objective summary of
the text.
• Students determine
a theme or central
idea of a text and
analyze in detail its
development over the
course of the text,
including how it
emerges and is shaped
and refined by specific
details. Students
provide an objective
summary of the text.
• Students explain
how an author
develops the point of
view of the narrator or
speaker in a text.
11/09/2012
• Students analyze
how an author
develops and
contrasts the points of
view of different
characters or
narrators in a text.
• Students analyze how
differences in the
points of view of the
characters and the
audience or reader
create such effects as
suspense or humor.
• Students analyze a
particular point of view
or cultural experience
reflected in a work of
literature from outside
the United States.
Reading for Information
5th grade
• Students quote
accurately
from a text when
explaining
what the text says
explicitly
and when drawing
inferences
from the text.
• Students draw on
information
from multiple print or
digital
sources,
demonstrating the
ability to locate an
answer to a
question quickly or to
solve a
problem efficiently.
6th grade
• Students cite
evidence from the
text to support
analysis of what the
text says explicitly as
well as inferences
drawn from the text.
• Students integrate
information
presented in
different media or
formats (such as
visually, or through
numbers) as well as
in words to develop a
coherent
understanding of a
topic or issue.
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7th grade
• Students cite
several pieces of
evidence from the
text to support
analysis of what the
text says explicitly as
well as inferences
drawn from the text.
• Students compare
and contrast a text to
an audio, video, or
multimedia version
of the text, analyzing
each medium’s
portrayal of the
subject (such as how
the delivery of a
speech affects the
impact of the words).
8th grade
• Students cite
evidence from the
text that most
strongly supports an
analysis of what the
text says explicitly as
well as inferences
drawn from the text.
• Students evaluate
the advantages and
disadvantages of using
different mediums
(such as print or
digital text, video, or
multimedia) to
present a particular
topic or idea.
9th grade
• Students cite strong
and thorough
evidence from the
text to support an
analysis of what the
text says explicitly as
well as inferences
drawn from the text.
• Students analyze
various accounts of a
subject told in
different mediums
(such as a person’s
life story recounted
in print, video, and
multimedia),
determining which
details are
emphasized in each
account.
Writing
5th grade
• Students introduce a topic
clearly,
providing a general
observation
and focus, and develop the
topic
with facts, definitions,
concrete
details, quotations, or other
information.
• Students provide a
concluding
statement or section related
to
the information or
explanation
presented.
• Students group related
information logically.
• Students link ideas within
and
across categories of
information
using words, phrases, and
clauses
such as in contrast or
especially.
• Students use precise
language and
subject-specific
vocabulary.
6th grade
• Students introduce a
topic and develop the topic
with relevant facts,
definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or
other information.
• Students provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from
the information or
explanation presented.
• Students organize ideas,
concepts, and information
using strategies such as
definition, classification,
comparison/contrast, and
cause/effect.
• Students use appropriate
transitions to clarify the
relationships among ideas
and concepts.
• Students use precise
language and subjectspecific vocabulary.
7th grade
• Students introduce a
topic clearly, previewing
what is to follow, and
develop the topic with
relevant facts, definitions,
concrete details,
quotations, or other
information.
8th grade
• Students introduce a
topic clearly, previewing
what is to follow, and
develop the topic with
relevant, well-chosen facts,
definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or
other information.
• Students provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from
and supports the
information or explanation
presented.
• Students provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from
and supports the
information or explanation
presented.
• Students organize ideas,
concepts, and information
using strategies such as
definition, classification,
comparison/contrast, and
cause/effect.
• Students organize ideas,
concepts, and information
into broader categories.
• Students provide a
concluding statement or
section that follows from and
supports the information or
explanation presented (such
as articulating implications
or the significance of the
topic).
• Students use appropriate
and varied transitions to
create cohesion and clarify
the relationships among
ideas and concepts.
• Students organize complex
ideas, concepts, and
information to make
important connections and
distinctions.
• Students use precise
language and subjectspecific vocabulary to
inform about or explain the
topic.
• Students use appropriate
and varied transitions to link
the major sections of the
text, create cohesion, and
clarify the relationships
among complex ideas and
concepts.
• Students use appropriate
transitions to create
cohesion and clarify the
relationships among ideas
and concepts.
• Students use precise
language and subjectspecific vocabulary to
inform or explain the topic.
9th grade
• Students introduce a topic
and develop the topic with
well-chosen, relevant, and
sufficient facts, extended
definitions, concrete details,
quotations, or other
information and examples
appropriate to the audience’s
knowledge of the topic.
• Students use precise
language and subject-specific
vocabulary appropriate for
the complexity of the topic.
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Suggestions
 Listen to the news with your child. Ask
them the speakers’ main points. Were
they trying to convince the audience of
something? How?
 Keep books and magazines around the
house that your child will enjoy
reading. Encourage everyone in the
home to read daily.
 Visit the library or bookstore. Ask your
child about their favorite author. Talk
with the librarian or bookseller about
young adult best sellers or
recommendations.
Suggestions
 Encourage your child to learn
about what life was like in our
community 100 years ago (at the
library or on the Internet.) Visit
Main Street and the Chamber of
Commerce. Have your child write
about what they learned.
 Talk with your child about what is
happening in the world. Families
are busy, so try to schedule
regular times to discuss current
events and school happenings.
7/20/2015
Suggestions
 Visit an art museum. Discuss
details of various pieces.
 Visit a college campus. Begin
talking about college. Find out
what your child expects from
college and discuss the high school
courses they will need to pass to
prepare for college.
 Have dinner as a family and
practice listening skills and making
conversation.
7/20/2015
What reading looks like now for
your child…
excerpt from “A Quilt of a Country”
by Anna Quindlen
America is an improbable idea. A mongrel nation built of
ever-changing disparate parts, it is held together by a
notion; the notion that all men are created equal, though
everyone knows that most men consider themselves better
than someone. “Of all the nations in the world, the United
States was built in nobody’s image,” the historian Daniel
Boorstin wrote. That’s because it was built of bits and pieces
that seem discordant, like the crazy quilts that have been
one of its great folk-art forms, velvet and calico and checks
and brocades. Out of many, one. That is the ideal.
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Questions:
1) Why does the author state that
America is an “improbable” idea?
2) What is the impact of varying
sentence length throughout the
selection?
3) Which sentence best supports the
central idea of the selection?
4) Why does the author include the
quote by Daniel Boorstin?
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Questions?
7/20/2015

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