Hypothesis - haringey6sport - haringey6sport | BTEC Sport

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Hypothesis
Research Methods
Sport and Exercise Science
Learning objectives
Grading Criteria
• Describe (P6) two contrasting quantitative data
analysis techniques used in the sport and exercise sciences
using an example of Microsoft Excel calculations & print
screens:
•
– T Test
– Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient
•
• (D) For 2 selected research-based examples, justify (M4)
the most appropriate research design and techniques (Null,
Alternate & Directional Hypotheses) for quantitative
data collection and data analysis such as:
•
• Pre & Post Test Design: Fitness test result before and
after training programmes
• Comparative Design: Relationship between two fitness
tests e.g. BMI and Resting heart rate
Recap
What is a hypothesis
• A hypothesis is a useful TESTABLE statement
that proposes some explanation to an event
• A hypothesis may include a prediction
• However a hypothesis is NOT a theory
When would it be used?
• The key word is Testable.
• You would perform a test on two variables and how
they might be related
• Hypothesis is usually based on some previous
observation such as your HR increases when you
exercise
• Are the two events connected?
• How are they connected?
• Task: Think of two variables that may be connected in
Sport and Exercise Science and give 3 examples.
Hypothesis
•
•
•
•
A formal hypothesis contains 2 variables one is
Independent and the other
Dependent
The independent variable is the one you, the
"scientist" control
• the dependent variable is the one that you
observe and/or measure the results.
Task
• Question: What effect does exercise have on
heart rate?
• What is your hypothesis?
• Which is the dependent and independent
variable and why?
• Exercise would be the independent variable
• Heart rate would be dependent variable
Null or Alternate
• null hypothesis(H0): typically that there is no
effect
• Alternate hypothesis (H1): typically that there
is an effect, or that there is an effect of a
particular sign
• Task
• Using heart rate and exercise write down
individually, the null and alternate hypothesis.
Types of hypothesis: T TEST
• Null hypothesis – There will be no significant
difference in heart rate following a 2km run at a
pace of 6km/h.
•
• Alternative hypothesis – There will be a
significant difference in heart rate following a
2km run at a pace of 6km/h.
• Directional hypothesis – There will be no
significant increase in heart rate following a 2km
run at a pace of 6km/h. (can be increase or decrease)
Hypothesis: Correlations
• Null hypothesis – There will be no relationship
between resting heart rate and BMI.
• Alternative hypothesis – There will be a
relationship between resting heart rate and BMI.
• Directional hypothesis – There will be a positive
relationship between resting heart rate and BMI.
• (can be positive or negative)
Hypothesis work sheet

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