Chapter 3 Discovering Your Learning Styles, Self

Report
Chapter 3
Recognizing Your Learning
Styles, Self-Concept, and
Values
3-2
Recognizing Your Learning Styles
• Learning styles
– How we acquire and use knowledge
– Many different methods
– What is your preferred receptive learning
style?
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Read/write style
Visual/graphic style
Auditory/verbal style
Tactile/kinesthetic style
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Recognizing Your Learning Styles
• Theory of Multiple Intelligences – “How Are You
Smart?”
– Logical-mathematical
• Problem solving and scientific thinking
– Linguistic intelligence
• Production and use of language
– Spatial intelligence
• Spatial configurations, such as those used by artists and
architects
– Interpersonal intelligence
• Interacting with others and a sensitivity to moods,
temperaments, motivations of others
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3-4
Recognizing Your Learning Styles
• Theory of Multiple Intelligences – “How Are You
Smart?”
– Intrapersonal intelligence
• Strong understanding of the internal aspects of oneself and
access to emotions
– Musical intelligence
• Skills related to music
– Bodily kinesthetic intelligence
• Skill in using the body in the solution of problems – dancers,
athletes, actors, surgeons
– Naturalist intelligence
• Skills in identifying and classifying patterns in nature
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Personality Styles
3-5
• Four major personality dimensions
– Most of us fall between the end points of each
dimension
– Introverts vs. Extroverts
– Intuitors vs. Sensors
– Thinkers vs. Feelers
– Perceivers vs. Judgers
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3-6
The Origins of Our Learning Styles
• Left-brain processing
– Verbal competence (reading, speaking,
thinking and reasoning)
– Information is processed sequentially
• Right-brain processing
– Nonverbal competence (spatial
relationships, recognition of patterns and
drawings, music and emotional expression)
– Information processed globally
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3-7
The Origins of Our Learning Styles
• You have a variety of styles
• Your style reflects your preferences
regarding which ability you like to use
• Your style will change throughout your life
• You should work on using less-preferred
styles
• Work cooperatively with others who have
different styles
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Self-Concept: “Who Am I?”
3-8
• Self-concept has 3 parts:
– Our physical self: how we look, and our
opinion of our physical self
– Our social self: the roles we play during our
social interactions
– Our self-concept: our personal self or inner
core which contains our innermost thoughts
and experiences
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3-9
Self-Concept and Self-Fulfilling Prophecies
• Self-fulfilling prophecy – how our beliefs
and expectations affect our behavior
• To get a clearer picture of who you are:
– Examine the roles you play
– Identify your strengths and weaknesses
– Construct your own definition of who you are
– Accept your entire self-concept
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3-10
Self-Esteem: Building a Positive View of Yourself
• Self-esteem is the overall evaluation we
give ourselves as individuals
• People with high self-esteem are generally
happier and cope better
• Low self-esteem can produce a cycle of
failure
• Self-efficacy: the expectation that you are
capable of achieving goals
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3-11
The Cycle of Failure and the Cycle of Success
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3-12
Breaking the Self-Esteem Cycle of Failure
• Accept who you are
• Accept that everyone has value and selfworth
• Distinguish the different parts of who you
are
• Don’t be dependent upon others’ praise
• Building self-esteem is a lifelong
undertaking
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3-13
Preparing a Personal Mission Statement
• Prepare
– Identify your values
• Organize
– Impose order on what motivates you
– Understand Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
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3-14
Preparing a Personal Mission Statement
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3-15
Preparing a Personal Mission Statement
• Work
– Move from abstract values and motivational
needs to concrete and specific goals
– Summarize your most important values and
needs
– Consider what you want your major outcome
to be
– Reflect on the kind of person you want to be
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3-16
Preparing a Personal Mission Statement
• Evaluate
– Does your personal mission statement reflect
who you are?
– Does it take a long-term view?
– Is it general enough?
• Rethink
– Your personal mission statement is a living
document
– It changes as your goals become clearer
– Periodically revisit your mission statement
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Making Wise Personal Decisions
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• Although we should consider the ideas
and opinions of others, we need to make
our own decisions and choose our own
path.
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