usgs analysis of storm tide impacts by chris schubert

Report
USGS Analysis of
Storm-Tide Impacts
from Hurricane Sandy,
and Plans during
Future Coastal Storms
Chris Schubert, USGS
2014 Long Island-NYC
Emergency Management
Conference
USGS workshop outline
 What’s new in the past year?
 Comparisons of Sandy’s peaks to historical storms
and annual exceedance probabilities (recurrence
intervals)
 Assessments of storm-surge magnitude and timing
 Comparisons of inundation maps derived from
differing amounts of available data
 Where is USGS headed on coastal storms?
 Storm, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH)
Network
Storm surge versus storm tide
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/surge/
Sandy—by the numbers
 Largest-sized storm
to hit U.S.
 Second costliest
storm in U.S. history
 253 lives lost overall;
77 in NY, NJ & CT
 About 2/3 of 77
deaths due to surge
Sensor strapped to bridge piling at Great South Bay, Captree
Island, NY.
RDG installed on bridge over State Boat
Channel, Captree Island, NY.
Hudson Bay at Freeport, NY
Rockaway Inlet at Floyd Bennett Field, NY.
Surveying of debris line, Throgs Neck, Bronx County, NY.
Wash line on building Belle Harbor, Queens County, NY.
Seed line on side of fence, Tottenville, Richmond County, NY.
Permanent and temporary monitoring sites and high-water-mark sites
that documented the storm tide of Hurricane Sandy
Permanent and temporary monitoring sites and high-water-mark sites
that documented the storm tide of Hurricane Sandy
The need for an interpretive report to assist FEMA and other
stakeholders in future flood-damage analysis and flood
mitigation prompted the current analysis of Hurricane Sandy
under this mission assignment.
 The analysis of storm-tide impacts focused on
1) comparisons of peak storm-tide elevations to
those from historical storms and to annual
exceedance probabilities;
2) assessments of storm-surge magnitude and
timing; and
3) comparisons of inundation maps derived from
differing amounts of available sensor and HWM
data.
Peak storm-tide elevations produced by Hurricane Sandy
Peak storm-tide elevations produced by Hurricane Sandy
Differences in feet between peak storm-tide elevations produced by
Hurricane Sandy and the storm of December 11-13, 1992
Differences in feet between peak storm-tide elevations produced by
Hurricane Sandy and Tropical Storm Irene
Select annual exceedance probabilities for peak storm-tide elevations
produced by Hurricane Sandy
Select annual exceedance probabilities for peak storm-tide elevations
produced by Hurricane Sandy
Storm-surge magnitude associated with the peak storm tide
produced by Hurricane Sandy
Magnitude of the peak storm surge produced by Hurricane Sandy
Timing of the peak storm surge produced
by Hurricane Sandy
Extents of storm-tide inundation from Hurricane Sandy derived from differing
amounts of USGS storm-tide data—10/31/12 NHC SLOSH model hindcast product
HAZUS estimates of total building stock losses due to storm-tide inundation from
Hurricane Sandy for 10/31/12 NHC SLOSH model hindcast product
Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics
(SWaTH) Network
 The SWaTH network expands upon
the USGS storm-tide program
started after Hurricane Katrina.
 Network developed for Northeast
Coast from Virginia to Maine.
 Expanded to include deployment for
major Nor’easters, in addition to
tropical systems.
 Provides a foundation for integrated
science and decision support.
 Will be used as a template for the
remainder of the Nation’s coastline.
Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics
(SWaTH) Network
 Network developed with input from
Federal, State and local partners,
emergency managers, and coastal
researchers and modelers.
 Includes both long-term and
temporary stations operated by the
USGS and other partners.
 Provide key data for enhanced
mapping of inundation,
contamination, and erosion
vulnerability.
 Provide baseline data for assessing
coastal ecosystem change and
adaptive management planning.
Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics
(SWaTH) Network
Entire proposed network consists of
about 1,000 sites:
 76 non-USGS stations,
 162 coastal stations/tidal streams,
 60 rapid-deployment gages,
 384 temporary storm-tide sensors,
 217 temporary wave sensors,
 102 temporary barometric-pressure
sensors.
Not all stations will be fitted with
sensors for any one storm.
Data distributed through an online
mapper in near-real time or as data is
collected.
Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics
(SWaTH) Network
 Long Term (blue points): station such as a continuous-record coastalmonitoring station or tidal streamgage.
 Temporary (red points): storm-deployed gage such as an RDG, or
storm-tide, wave-height, or barometric-pressure sensor.
Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics
(SWaTH) Network
 Distributed (blue points): stations spaced geographically to facilitate
monitoring on a regional scale or for high-priority sites.
 Transect (orange points): stations included as part of a wetlands or
urban transect (e.g. from open coast to back bays to inland).
Deployment Schedule
The proposed timeline for deploying the temporary sensor
brackets and RPs is as follows:
 Complete all existing locations (those deployed for Sandy
and Irene) by June 15, 2014;
 Complete 80% of the entire network by August 1, 2014;
 Complete 100% of the network by September 30, 2014.
For more information, contact:
Chris Schubert
[email protected]
Ron Busciolano
[email protected]
U.S. Geological Survey
N.Y. Water Science Center
(631) 736-0783, -4283 fax
http://ny.water.usgs.gov
http://ny.water.usgs.gov

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