EngageNY - The Charles A. Dana Center

Report
Common Core:
When Do We Buy &
When Do We Build
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College Graduation and Remediation Rates
The more remedial classes students take, the less likely they are to stay in college.
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2
New York
Percent at or above Proficient: 3-8 ELA & Math
2009
Grade
2010
2012
ELA
Math
ELA
Math
ELA
Math
3
76
93
55
59
56
61
4
77
87
57
64
59
69
5
82
88
53
65
58
67
6
81
83
54
61
56
65
7
80
87
50
62
52
65
8
69
80
51
55
50
61
NAEP 2007
NAEP 2009
NAEP 2011
Grade
Reading
Math
Reading
Math
Reading
Math
4
36
43
36
40
35
36
8
32
30
33
34
35
30
Source: NYSED June 17, 2012 Release of Data (Background Information: Slide Presentation). Available at:
http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/pressRelease/20120717/2012-ELAandMathSlides-SHORTDECK-7-16-12.ppt. ELA data from slide 16; Math
data from slide 31. Percentages represent students scoring a “3” or a “4”
Source: NAEP Summary Report for New York State. Available at: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/states/Default.aspx
Most recent year available for Reading and Mathematics is 2011.
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If you build it (and it’s good),
they will come,
and then they will change their practice…
• P-12 Comprehensive Curriculum for ELA,
Math, Science, Social Studies, the Arts
• Video Projects – classroom, reflection, studio
• Assessment Design Documents
• Sample Assessment Items
• Tri State Rubric
• Evidence Collection Tools
• Professional Development Kits
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Context for Curriculum Work
• Vendor Partners: $26 MM (RttT)
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•
•
•
•
P-2 ELA: Core Knowledge
3-8 ELA: Expeditionary Learning
9-12 ELA: PCG & Odell Education
P-12 Math: Common Core, Inc.
Regents Research Fund/ SED = 3 FTE + 2 Mgrs
Teacher Reviewers = 50 teachers @ 10 hrs/wk
Intensive Review Cycles with SAP
SAP calibration and gradual release to RRF/ SED
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Instructional Shifts Demanded by the Core
6 Shifts in ELA/Literacy
Balancing Informational and Literary Text
Building Knowledge in the Disciplines
Staircase of Complexity
Text-based Answers
Writing from Sources
Academic Vocabulary
6 Shifts in Mathematics
Focus
Coherence
Fluency
Deep Understanding
Applications
Dual Intensity
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6
6
Shifts in Assessments
Six Shifts in Mathematics Assessments
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Math Assessment Documents
NYS Item
Review Criteria
for Potential
Math Tests
Multiple
Representations
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8
EQUiP Rubrics – Math & ELA/ Literacy
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9
Common Misconceptions in draft Math
Curriculum
• Progressions
• Focus
• Micro Standards or All-in-One Standards
• Teachers are still doing all the thinking
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Traditional U.S. Approach
K
12
Number and
Operations
Measurement
and Geometry
Algebra and
Functions
Statistics and
Probability
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11
Focusing Attention Within Number and
Operations
Operations and
Algebraic Thinking
→
Expressions
and
→
Equations
Number and
→
Operations—Base Ten
Number
and
→
Operations
—Fractions
K
1
2
3
4
5
Algebra
The Number →
System
6
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8
High School
12
12
12
Major Areas of Work: P-2
Grade
K
Major Areas of Work
Counting and Cardinality
•Know number names and count sequence
•Count to tell the number of objects.
•Compare numbers.
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•Work with numbers 11-19 to grain foundations for place value.
1
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
•Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
•Add and subtract within 20.
•Work with addition and subtraction equations.
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•Extend the counting sequence.
•Understand place value.
•Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
Measurement and Data
•Measure lengths indirectly by iterating length units.
2
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
•Add and subtract within 20.
•Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•Understand place value.
•Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
Measurement and Data
•Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.
•Relate addition and subtraction to length.
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Major Areas of Work: 3-5
Grade
3
Major Areas of Work
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
•Understand the properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.
•Multiply and divide within 100.
•Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.
Number and Operations - Fractions
•Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
Measurement and Data
•Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects.
•Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition.
4
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
•Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
•Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
Number and Operations - Fractions
•Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
•Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole
numbers.
•Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
5
Number and Operations in Base Ten
•Understand the place value system.
•Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.
Number and Operations - Fractions
•Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.
•Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply and divide fractions.
Measurement and Data
•Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition.
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Major Areas of Work: 6-8
Grade
6
Major Areas of Work
Ratios and Proportional Relationships
•Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
The Number System
•Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.
•Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
Expressions and Equations
•Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
•Reason about and solve one variable equations and inequalities.
•Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
7
Ratios and Proportional Relationships
•Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
The Number System
•Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational
numbers.
Expressions and Equations
•Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
•Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.
8
Expressions and Equations
•Work with radicals and integer exponents.
•Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
•Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
Functions
•Define, evaluate, and compare functions.
Geometry
•Understand and apply the Pythagorean theorem.
•Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software.
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Sample Grade 5
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Common Misconceptions in draft Math
Curriculum
• Progressions

Are students steadily acquiring knowledge and
skills along the progressions?
• Focus

Are the focus standards being addressed
primarily?
• Micro Standards or All-in-One Standards

Are students learning bits of standards at a time?
• Teachers are still doing all the thinking

If you read between the lines, who will actually be
thinking and talking math publicly?
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Instructional Shifts Demanded by the Core
6 Shifts in ELA/Literacy
Balancing Informational and Literary Text
Building Knowledge in the Disciplines
Staircase of Complexity
Text-based Answers
Writing from Sources
Academic Vocabulary
6 Shifts in Mathematics
Focus
Coherence
Fluency
Deep Understanding
Applications
Dual Intensity
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Shifts in Assessments
Six Shifts in ELA Assessments
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ELA Assessment Documents
Item Review
Passage Selection
• Item Review Criteria
for 3-5
• Item Review Criteria
for 6-8
• NYS Passage Review
Criteria
• Passage Selection
Criteria
• Authentic Text
Selection
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EQUiP Rubrics – Math & ELA/ Literacy
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Common Misconceptions in draft ELA
Curriculum
• Low Rigor Questions and Activities
• Pacing of Texts
• Micro Standards or All-in-One Standards
• Teachers are still doing all the thinking
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The Wizard of Oz
Use details and evidence to support your answers!

What motivates Dorothy?
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What role do the red shoes play?
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What element of the human psyche does the lion
represent?

What is the climax of the story?

How many settings are there in the story?

Is it real or is it a dream?

What is the theme?
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Just a Sentence & a Standard
From Sherman Alexie’s “Every Little Hurricane”:
“Although it was winter, the nearest ocean four
hundred miles away, and the Tribal Weatherman
asleep because of-boredom, a hurricane
dropped from the sky in 1976 and fell so hard on
the Spokane Indian Reservation that it knocked
Victor from bed and his latest nightmare.”
9.RL.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are
used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings;
analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone.
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Pre-CCSS Questions
• What weather words and phrases does the author
use?
• Alexie uses the paradox of fighting at a party, two
seemingly incompatible events that nonetheless
occur. What other examples of paradox appear in
the story, and why might that be?
• Which character to you most resemble? Why?
• How does the author use one or more major
metaphors (storms, water, drowning)?
• Write a brief summary of the text, its relationship to
events, and its use of symbolism and paradox to
illustrate it major theme.
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Reading Targets
CCSS goal: students leave the
lesson having read, analyzed and
understood what they have READ.
Current goal: Students leave
the lesson knowing the
details of the narrative and
the way a particular “element”
is playing out.
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A Common Concern:
Literary Elements (Now part of a greater whole…)
2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail
its development over the course of the text including how it
emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide
an objective summary of the text.
3.
Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a
text, interact with others, and advance the plot or develop the
theme.
4.
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure
a text, order events within it (e.g. parallel plots) and
manipulate time (e.g. pacing, flashbacks) create such effects
as mystery, tension, and surprise.
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A Common Concern…
Stamina/ Miles on the Page
• There is a difference between witnessing the scope
of the narrative and conducting analysis of words on
the page.
• Details of the narrative are not sufficient evidence
for marshaling an argument.
• Close reading is a mission critical activity if students
are to be able to tackle the number and complexity of
texts assigned to them in college.
• True stamina will come.
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Common Misconceptions in draft ELA
curriculum…
• Low Rigor Questions and Activities


What are the kids actually doing?
Do the activities and questions require them to
be able to read, understand, and analyze?
• Pacing of Texts

When is the “reading” actually happening?
• Micro Standards or All-in-One Standards
• Teachers are still doing all the thinking

If you read between the lines, who will end up
making the meaning?
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EQUiP Rubrics – Math & ELA/ Literacy
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Your materials
Math Misconceptions
ELA Misconceptions
•
•
•
•
• Low Rigor Questions
and Activities
• Pacing of Texts
• Micro Standards or Allin-One Standards
• Teachers are still doing
all the thinking
Progressions
Focus
Micro Standards
Teachers are still doing
all the thinking
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What we’ve learned…
• Highly Qualified Writers and Reviewers take up to 6 months to
calibrate
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Devotion to/ experience in a content area does not a CCSS writer/
reviewer make
A good teacher does not a curriculum writer/ reviewer make
Much of what must shift is sacred
• Rhetorical alignment and actual alignment are two different
things
• CCSS stickers are easy to produce; true quality, rigor, and
alignment are not
• It often takes 6-8 revision cycles to get to necessary levels of
quality/ rigor/ alignment
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Spend
• Money on Texts (Books/ Periodicals/
Databases) and Math Materials
• Time on
• Conceptual PD in Math for Elementary & Secondary
Teachers
• PD on Research Writing (standards 7-9) for Secondary (6-8)
Teachers
• Adult to Adult conversations about Content
– Math concepts
– ELA Texts
• PLCs devoted to problem solving implementation/ shift
experimentation/ evidence collection guides
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Timeline for Modules
Content
Area
Math
Grade Band
By
July 31
P-5
1/2
6-8, 10
1/3
2/3
9
1/2
All
11,12
ELA
By
September
2/3
3-5
All
6-8
1/2
9-12
1/4
By
April 2014
All
1/3
P-2
By
December
All
2/3
All
All
All
1/2
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3/4
All
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Evidence Collection Tools
Ideal for evidence based
feedback on practice
•peer observations
•informal supervisory
observations
•learning walks
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