Slide 1

Report
From Kyoto to Copenhagen –
From Energy Waste to Clean
Energy use in Buildings
Cutting down energy consumption in buildings
Towards a factor 4 policy for buildings
10 October 2009
Copenhagen
International Energy Agency IEA
Jens Laustsen
Policy Analyst for Efficiency in Buildings
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Key messages
 Energy efficiency is a critical part of a
sustainable energy future
 Buildings energy use can be reduced
dramatically alone with existing solutions
 A reduction to ¼ of BAU in 2050 is rational
and economic reasonable (Factor 4)
 IEA 25 recommendations provide direction
– high emphasis on buildings
 W.I.N = World-wide Implementation Now
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Energy efficiency – critical part of
sustainable energy future
Buildings:
Can deliver larges
reductions in CO2
emissions at low costs
Gigatonnes
Reductions in energy-related CO2
emissions in the climate-policy scenarios
45
550
Policy
Scenario
40
450
Policy
Scenario
9%
14%
35
23%
30
54%
Energy efficiency
25
20
2005
Nuclear
CCS
Renewables & biofuels
77 % of the
solution !
2010
2015
Reference Scenario
2020
550 Policy Scenario
2025
2030
450 Policy Scenario
Energy Efficiency
in buildings is a
central part of this
While technological progress is needed to achieve some emissions reductions, efficiency
gains and deployment of existing low-carbon energy account for most of the savings.
© OECD/IEA - 2008
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Energy efficiency in buildings is climate
change abatement at low costs
• Why ?
- They are feasible on long term !
Renewable Energy
Buildings
Buildings
IEA: Energy technology perspective 2008
McKenzie institute: Climate reports 2007 - 2009
 Many recent studies shows exactly the same trends !
 But maybe we don’t take these initiatives far enough !
• How far can we take energy efficiency in buildings at
rational costs ?
• Examples from ongoing IEA study !
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Energy use in Buildings
From Waste of Energy to Clean Energy
Frankfurt/M Germany Sophienhof
FAAG/ABG Frankfurt Architect Fuessler
Blocks of Flats
160 dwellings
14 767 m²
Passive House Technology
15 kwh / m² per year
Can we afford this ?
Extra costs
= 3-5% of the total costs
Payback = 9 – 10 years
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Zero Carbon / Zero Energy
BedZet, London, UK
The way to Zero Energy Buildings in US, DOE
Is this possible ?
Zero Carbon
Plus Energy
2019
Development of UK
Buildings Codes
Solar Siedlung Vauban
Freiburg, Germany
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Building Codes Towards Zero
kWh per m² per year
How does this become mainstream ?
Setting zero targets 2025 / 30
California Energy Commission
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Package for existing Buildings
Frankfurt Refurbishment using Passive House Technology
Factor 10
87%
Source: Passivehouse
Institute / DENA
All existing buildings need to be
refurbished in next 40 - 50 years
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Better than new !
Energy standard refurbishment
300
Germany
250
Demands refurbishment
200
kWh7(m²a)
Demands new
150
Primary losses
Losses in system
Hot sanitory water
Minus 30 %
Energy demand
100
Minus 50 %
Factor 10
50
us
e
%
ho
si
ve
as
P
m
nE
V
E
E
nE
V
m
in
u
s
30
in
u
s
50
%
s
in
g
ui
ld
B
N
ew
E
vE
V
nE
V
E
E
xi
st
in
g
S
bu
an
ild
ie
r
in
un
g
gs
0
Very Best practice
Renovation
in Germany
Source: DENA Besser als ein Neubau
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Better than new !
Energy standard refurbishment
300
High-rise: Changing the View
IEA / EuroAce 2006
Germany
250
Demands refurbishment
200
kWh7(m²a)
Demands new
Primary losses
Losses in system
Hot sanitory water
150
Minus 30 %
Very Best practice
Renovation
in Germany
Factor 10
Energy demand
St. Petersburg, Russia
100
Minus 50 %
Factor 10
50
us
e
%
ho
si
ve
as
P
m
nE
V
E
E
nE
V
m
in
u
s
30
in
u
s
50
%
s
in
g
ui
ld
B
N
ew
E
vE
V
nE
V
E
E
xi
st
in
g
S
bu
an
ild
ie
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gs
0
Very Best practice
Renovation
in Germany
28 kWh/m² 28 kWh/m² 22 kWh/m² 44 kWh/m² 21 kWh/m² 35 kWh/m²
- 91 %
- 88 %
- 89 %
- 83 %
- 96 %
- 90 %
Source: DENA Besser als ein Neubau
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Demands for products
• Mandatory solar systems
– Israel, Spain, Portugal
• Minimum efficiency for
products - labelling
Florida Solar initiative
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Cut Energy Waste
Going new ways
– or finding old solutions
Cut energy waste in buildings !
There is a large potential:
• We have to go new ways
• Use control systems
and new solutions
• But we also need to look at
history / tradition
Training of architects,
engineers, installers,
constructors is essential
Energy efficiency needs
to be at the front page !
An example !
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Generic Architecture
Windows
Misr University for Science
and Technology, Cairo
No windows !
No windows !
Windows
Source Proffessor Ahmed Abdin,
Cairo Technical University
Old solutions –
generic architecture
used in new ways
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Generic Architecture
Misr University for Science
and Technology, Cairo
Source Proffessor Ahmed Abdin,
Cairo Technical University
Old solutions –
generic architecture
used in new ways
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Generic Architecture
Protected against the sun !
Misr University for Science
and Technology, Cairo
Source Proffessor Ahmed Abdin,
Cairo Technical University
Old solutions –
generic architecture
used in new ways
But using sunlight !
© OECD/IEA, 2009
What if we do all this at the same time ?
IEA study in progress
Modelling on energy efficient buildings
Development in the 9 regions
Rest of World
20000
15000
Hot Sanatory
Water
10000
Cooling
Ventilation
5000
Heating
© OECD/IEA, 2009
2050
2045
2040
2035
2030
2025
2020
2015
2010
2005
0
Study on Energy Efficient Buildings
If very best practice examples and policies were implemented
globally and fast:
 Energy use for buildings (heating, cooling, ventilation and hot
water) could be reduced far beyond 50 %.
 75 % reduction compared to business as usual would probably
both be possible and rational.
 Book to document this will be out early 2010.
 Such and implementation of energy efficiency in buildings would
have massive impact on:
•
•
•
•
•
Security of supply,
CO2 emissions,
Global health,
Investments in supply sector,
Would crate millions of new jobs.
 Increased research and deployment can increase this potential.
© OECD/IEA, 2009
25 energy efficiency policy recommendations across 7 priority areas
1. Across sectors
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
Measures for increasing investment in energy
efficiency;
National energy efficiency strategies and
goals;
Compliance, monitoring, enforcement and
evaluation of energy efficiency measures;
Energy efficiency indicators;
Monitoring and reporting progress with the
IEA energy efficiency recommendations
themselves.
2. Buildings
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
Building codes for new buildings;
Passive Energy Houses and Zero Energy
Buildings;
Policy packages to promote energy efficiency
in existing buildings;
Building certification schemes;
Energy efficiency improvements in glazed
areas.
3. Appliances
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
Mandatory energy performance requirements
or labels;
Low-power modes, including standby power,
for electronic and networked equipment;
Televisions and “set-top” boxes;
Energy performance test standards and
measurement protocols.
4. Lighting
4.1 Best practice lighting and the phase-out
of incandescent bulbs;
4.2 Ensuring least-cost lighting in nonresidential buildings and the phase-out
of inefficient fuel-based lighting.
5. Transport
5.1 Fuel-efficient tyres;
5.2 Mandatory fuel efficiency standards for
light-duty vehicles;
5.3 Fuel economy of heavy-duty vehicles;
5.4 Eco-driving.
6. Industry
6.1 Collection of high quality energy
efficiency data for industry;
6.2 Energy performance of electric motors;
6.3 Assistance in developing energy
management capability;
6.4 Policy packages to promote energy
efficiency in small and medium-sized
enterprises.
7. Utilities
7.1 Utility end-use energy efficiency
schemes.
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Conclusions
•
Energy efficiency in buildings is
www:
•
• Consumers win because they get
•
lower fuel cost and lower total costs
•
over time, increased comfort.
• Business win because it creates
activity and new jobs locally.
•
• Governments win because it
implements climate policy goals,
improves security of supply,
improves economy and health.
•
•
•
Potential is enormous.
Can contribute substantial to
climate abatement policies.
A reduction with factor 3 or 4 is
possible alone with known
solutions.
•
Policies exist but need larger
scope and global implementation.
Many barriers to overcome.
EE in buildings is cost efficient and
it will save large investments and
costs in supply.
EE in buildings will have many
additional benefits: health,
security of supply, creation of
employment.
Start with the 25 existing IEA
recommendations - already
endorsed by the G8 and large
developing countries.
• We need W.I.N
Much more can be done – both in new and existing buildings
© OECD/IEA, 2009
Thank you
For more information buildings and recommendations:
www.iea.org
www.iea.org/G8/2008/G8_EE_recommendations.pdf
Contact:
Jens.Laustsen@iea.org
Efficiencyinfo@iea.org

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