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HEALTHY IU WILL EMPOWER, EDUCATE, AND OFFER
ENVIRONMENTAL TOOLS TO ENCOURAGE MEMBERS OF THE IU
COMMUNITY TO LIVE THEIR BEST LIFE.
Healthy IU Steering Committee
Kathryn George Bayless: Asst. Dean & Exec. Director, Campus Rec Sports
Linda F. Brown: Health Psychology, Mindfulness-Based Therapies and Clinical
Psychologist in Private Practice
Jenny Rebecca Fleetwood: Work-Life Balance Coordinator, Human Resources
James M. Gladden: Dean, IU School of Physical Education & Tourism Mgmt.
Elin Christine Grimes: Registered Dietitian and Nutrition Counselor
Tracy L. James: Senior News & Media Specialist, IU Communications
Carol Kennedy-Armbruster : Sr. Lecturer, Kinesiology, School of Public
Health
Marilyn H. Kuhn: Chief Operating Officer, Lilly Family School of
Philanthropy
MaryFrances McCourt: Senior Vice President & Chief Financial Officer
Sara Elaine Peterson: Director - Human Resources & Employee Development,
Campus Facility Services
Daniel U. Rives : Associate Vice President for University Human Resources
Lisa K Staten: Associate Professor, Director, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department
Richard A. Strong: Director, Environmental Health & Safety
John Paul Tweedie : Senior Director of Administration & Finance
Stephen F. Wintermeyer: Assoc. Professor of Clinical Medicine, Adjunct
Assoc. Professor of Public Health
Philemon Kiprono Yebei: Director, Budget Administration, IUK
Patricia W. Hollingsworth:
Director, Healthy IU
P r o g r e s s To D a t e - E d u c a t i o n a l
Programs FY 13 & 14
•
•
•
Health Screenings - 10,165 participants
screened in both years saw a 15%
improvement in risk reduction.
Learn Over Lunch Awareness Building
Programs – (Workstation Workout,
Ergonomics, Stress Management ) 1,765 participants
Long Term Behavior Change programs
(Diabetes Prevention Program, Mindful
Way to Stress Reduction, Nutritional
Counseling) – 1,293 participants
2,038
1,293
1,767
10,165
5,523
Health Screenings
•
Walking Challenges with Pedometer 2038 participants
University Wide Survey- IUPUI Public Health
Healthy Change Awareness Learn Over Lunch
Long Term Behavior Change Programs
•
Fairbanks School of Public Health
Workplace Wellness Survey – 5523
participants
Walking Challenges
P r o g r e s s To D a t e
Environmental Changes
“I did the Mindful Meditation series
also, and it was extremely invaluable
to my health and well-being! I am
grateful for the opportunities and look
forward to using the Fitbit and
keeping the progress going in this
very positive direction! Thanks!”
•
Blood Pressure Machines
Installed – 26,394 BPs taken
•
Departmental Bikes Used in
Facilities Service
•
Departmental scales
•
Increased re-fillable water stations
•
Marked indoor walking routes
•
Provided 264 movement trackers
to focus groups in across several
administrative departments
I m p a c t o f E m p l o y e e We l l - b e i n g
Implications for Employees at High to
Moderate Risk
• Greater probability of chronic health
condition(s)
• Higher out-of-pocket medical and
pharmaceutical costs
• Greater pain and suffering
• Lower quality of life
• Lower personal effectiveness on and
off the job
Implication for Employees at Low Risk
• More independence/health
• Lower medical costs
• Greater energy and vitality
• Increased life and job satisfaction
Re: screening:
“That was the
wake-up call, I
thought, I need to
do something
about this. I
didn’t care until
t h e n ” - Akash Shah
I m p a c t o f E m p l o y e e We l l - b e i n g
Implications for Employers with Employees at High and Moderate Risk
•
•
•
•
•
Higher prevalence of chronic health conditions
Higher direct medical costs
Higher absenteeism
Higher disability and workers’ compensation costs
Lower productivity due to higher presenteeism
Implications for Employers with Employees at Low Risk
•
•
Healthier, productive workforce
Lower direct and indirect health-related costs
“I was one of those kids in high school who hated gym,
but when the Diabetes Prevention Program introduced
exercise in week five and we learned how to incorporate
being active into our everyday lives, it made sense. "Now
I walk at work and make a point of finding other ways to
not be so sedentary.” - Rob Aspy
Fairbanks School of Public Health Findings
Spring, 2013
33% (5523) of full time faculty
and staff completed the
survey
•
Statistical adjustment was
applied to ensure results
were representative of all fulltime employees
•
Survey similar to CDC
Behavior Risk Factor
Surveillance System
•
Survey was anonymous and
confidential
•
Reassessment planned for
Spring 2015 to measure risk
migration
24%
Medium Risk
(3-4 Risks)
Distribution of Risk
•
Strengths
The majority of full-time employees report that
•
•
•
•
•
IU is supportive of their health
Management believes health and safety are important
Coworkers are supportive of efforts to be healthy
Workplaces are perceived to be safe
They make healthy food choices when those options are available
Perceived health, physical activity levels, preventive services use, and
smoking rates are also encouraging.
IU Compared to Indiana, US, and Best State
100%
80%
90%
88%
80% 83%
84%
74% 77%
84%
86%
92%
77% 81%
60%
40%
24% 20%
20%
4%
11%
0%
Good or Excellent Health Get Physical Activity
IU
Indiana
Receive Routine Checkups
U.S.
Best
Smoking Prevalence
O p p o r tu ni t i e s
While some rates of chronic disease are more favorable than national
rates, there is still opportunity for improvement and prevention
•
•
•
•
40% have high cholesterol
26% have hypertension
• An additional 11% have pre-hypertension
29% are obese
• An additional 32% are overweight
6% have diabetes
• An additional 6% have pre-diabetes
IU Compared to Indiana, US, and Best State
50%
40%
40% 39% 38%
34%
30%
33% 31%
26%
23%
29% 31% 28%
21%
20%
6%
10%
11% 10%
7%
0%
High Cholesterol
Hypertension
IU
Indiana
Obesity
U.S. Median
Best
Diabetes prevalence
O p p o r tu ni t i e s
Stress & Mental Health
IU Compared to Indiana, US, and Best State
60%
40%
43%39%
36%
40%
28%
22%20%18%
20%
20%19%
12%
14%
0%
Had Poor Mental Health
Days in Past Month
IU
History of Depressive
Disorder
Indiana
U.S.
Inadequate Social &
Emotional Support
Best
Percent of Employees
Percent of Employees Who are Unaware
of Resources
80%
60%
60%
43%
40%
20%
0%
Ergonomics
EAP
O p p o r tu ni t i e s
Food Items of Interest to Employees
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Percent of Employees
Percent of Employees
Employee Interests Indicated on Survey
70%
66%
51%
Fresh fruits &
vegetables
Healthy food in Healthy options in
cafeteria
vending machines
Resources of Interest to Employees
80%
73%
71%
60%
48%
46%
40%
20%
0%
Exercise
facility
Walking
program
Stress
Weight
management management
Steering Committee Compass for
R e c o m m end at i on s
Healthy IU Values:
• Quality through respect for the uniqueness of each individual &
campus
• Transparency in Health IU design, delivery & evaluation
• Individual responsibility for personal health & well-being
• Collaboration & optimal use of resources
• Utilization of IU campus resources to foster learning for all
• Environments, systems and policies supportive of positive
lifestyle
Data:
• Fairbanks School of Public Health Workplace Wellness Survey
• CDC Scorecard
• Ensure information meaningful, comprehensive and evidenced
based
P r o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
New or
Impact Expansion
Mental Well-being
Timing
Establish a university wide ad-hoc committee to create a comprehensive
plan to address organizational issues surrounding stress and the impact
on the university. Organizational issues to address include: flexible work
Long
High
New
schedule policy implementation, participatory decision making; scope of
control; supportive environments; evaluation process and leadership
communication.
Address Awareness of Mental Well-being during health screenings with
Short Medium
New
links to self-assessment and resources.
Promote EAP mental health screenings and services
Short
High Expanded
Ensure various modalities of ongoing "drop-in" or relaxation at your
desk breaks on all campuses (example: mid-day mindfulness, tai chi,
Mid
Low Expanded
chair yoga, 5 min massage, walking initiatives)
Provide stress management programs on all campuses
Short
High Expanded
Cross promote mental well-being services through Organizational
Short Medium Expanded
Development/Healthy IU/Work-Life.
Expand existing work/life balance -life skills programs to all campuses
Mid
High Expanded
Raise manager/supervisor awareness about workplace stress related
issues and depression. Ensure managers and supervisors are aware of
Mid
Medium
New
services via awareness campaign.
Raise awareness about the importance of employee participation in
organizational decisions regarding workplace issues that affect job
Mid
High
New
stress.
Pr o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
Organizational Support
Continue the Steering Committee with rolling membership and recruit
new members to ensure all campuses have at least one representative.
The committee purpose is to provide guidance to the Healthy IU initiative
including quality, evaluation,
standards of care, communication,
organizational support and technical support in the areas that impact the
well-being of IU employees
To mark change in employee health and well-being, reassess
health/wellbeing of IU employees using the Fairbanks Study in spring
2015.
Clarify employee wellness participation time allowance parameters. (on
work time, on personal time, on work and personal time, supervisor
permission.)
Ensure strategic planning committees at the campus and university wide
level address employee well-being and/or quality of life .
Ensure all communications are provided at a 6th to 8th grade reading level.
Modify message to engage unique constituents where possible.
Evaluate the impact of environmental changes via a Health Impact
Assessment or literature review to avail data/ strategies for future
buildings and facility expansions.
Establish a policy that considers impact on the well being of employees
and students in new and renovated building
Promote the benefits of healthy employees with supervisor and
managers. And provide flexible work schedule policy awareness,
education and utilization support.
Promote spouse inclusion in wellness marketing and communications.
Encourage health initiatives with mutually beneficial community partners
that utilize best practice through campus coalitions.
Timing
Impact
New or Expansion
Short
High
Expanded
Short
High
Expanded
Mid
Medium
New
Short
Medium
New
Short
High
New
Long
Medium
New
Long
Medium
New
Mid
Medium
New
Mid
Low
Expanded
Long
Medium
New
P r o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
Weight Management & Diabetes Prevention
Expand Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) to offer a class on each
campus. Work to improve the effectiveness of the DPP curriculum by
making recommendations for additional program components based on
participant feedback and outcomes. An example: providing activity
tracking devices as an ongoing incentive to track healthy behaviors
Provide a flexible, easily accessible weight management program that can
provide a group and online programs for all campuses.
High Blood Pressure & Cholesterol
Continue health screening and expand the screening incentive program to
include options that encourage positive lifestyle choices like: recreation
memberships, weight watchers and fitbits.
Update screening staff on new cardiovascular risk guidelines.
Expand health screening resource materials (packet) to include information
and resources on signs and symptoms of mental illness, stroke, heart
attack, BP, cholesterol, PA, glucose, work/life, nutrition.
Provide American Heart Association health risk assessment link in post
screening e-mail.
Create a map of BP machine locations and post on web & screening
resource booklet.
Pilot Chronic Disease Self-Management.
Timing
Pilot Pharmacy Brown Bag checks or promote existing community services
Impact New or Expansion
Short
High
Expanded
Mid
High
Expanded
Mid
High
New
Short
High
Expanded
Short
Low
Expanded
Short
High
Expanded
Short
Low
Expanded
Mid
High
New
Long
Medium
New
P r o g r a m C o m p o ne nt
Nutrition
Establish a common healthy foods definition for all university campuses,
we recommend: “A healthy food is a plant or animal product that provides
essential nutrients and energy to sustain growth, health, and life while
satiating hunger.”
Establish University wide contracts with vending machine and other food
vendors to provide healthy food and beverage choices using the guidelines
from Reach Healthy Communities and Dietary Guidelines 2010. The initial
goal is to provide at least 50% healthy food options in vending machines and
ensure there are nutrient dense food options in cafeterias, snack bars, and
other purchase points.
Identify and publicize healthy food and beverages at all purchase points with
university-wide symbol.
Develop “healthy meetings guidelines” for foods and physical activity based
on Reach Healthy Communities program Healthy Meeting Guidelines
Promote healthy foods definition, symbol, meeting guidelines, etc. through
online and print media.
Promote university wide nutrition counseling and education services.
Timing
Impact
Short
New or
Expansion
New
Long
High
New
Mid
High
Expanded
Mid
Low
New
Mid
High
New
Short
Medium
New
Pr o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
Heart Attack and Emergency Response
Install AEDs and directional signs so that each building has at least 1 available
every IU building where people work, live and play.
Long term, install an adequate number of AED units such that a person can be
reached within 3–5 minutes of collapse.
Create communication campaign raising awareness of signs and symptoms of
heart attack and stroke, location of AED and CPR classes.
Tobacco
Enhance the tobacco free culture with expanded awareness, education and
counseling by:
a. Expanding the IUB parking lot intervention program which utilizes nicotine
gum and cessation information to all campuses.
b. Include face to face tobacco cessation counseling and 12 week group
program currently provided at IUB and IUPUI as options for the tobacco
benefit subsidy.
d. Raise awareness about the inclusion of e-cigarettes in the tobacco free
policy via web, print and news articles
Encourage recruitment, admissions and student services to raise awareness
about the tobacco free campus by:
a. Noting on all student applications (including international students),
acceptance letters and in orientation: “IU cares about your health and is a
tobacco free campus”. Suggest: “if you currently utilize tobacco, we suggest
you consider a tobacco cessation program before you arrive on campus”
b. Provide tobacco cessation table with campus cessation resources at
international and freshman orientation
c. Provide a Tobacco Free Awareness Campaign at the beginning of every
semester on all campuses. Ensure that all forms of tobacco use are addressed
including e-cigarettes.
Timing
Impact
New or
Expansion
Mid
High
Expanded
Long
High
Expanded
Short
Low
Expanded
Short
Medium
Short
Expanded
Mid
Expanded
Short
New
Short
Medium
New
P r o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
Physical Activity
Timing Impact
Implement and continue to seek enhancements to the built environment
Short/Mid High
which both promote and remove barriers related to physical activity
a. Stairway signage and elevator skins
b. Mark 1, 3 and 5 mile routes with way finders on each campus
c. Mark indoor walking routes
d. Continue to examine built environment for other opportunities
Create infrastructure to support sustainable culture related to physical
Short Medium
activity promotion
a. Hire Healthy IU coordinator to develop and oversee implementation of
area wellness programs
Create free or subsidized self-directed physical activity opportunities
Short
High
a. Coordinate the use of individualized tracker tools in conjunction with
long-term behavior change modification programs
b. Create social networks around activities and stages of change
Integrate Healthy IU physical activity efforts into academic efforts
Short/Mid High
a. Adapt existing Kinesiology efforts to include movement coaching,
service learning, and workplace wellness education and delivery
b. Evaluate all interventions for effectiveness on a regular basis
c. Develop criteria for identifying and supporting effective physical activity
programs
Augment existing biometric screenings with movement screenings
Long
High
a. Provide segmented opportunities for education, programming, and
subsidized physical activity opportunities based on results of movement
screening
New or Expansion
New
New
Expanded
Expanded
Expanded
P r o g r a m C o m p o ne nt s
Marketing & Communications
Create a visual identity that represents the intention of Healthy IU.
Refresh the Healthy IU website with the new visual identity designed by
IU Communications.
Hire a communications specialist to craft and implement a
communication plan, maintain website, maintain social media accounts
and ensure the visual identity is implemented throughout
communications. Create a communication toolkit to help apply branding
and the Healthy IU visual identity consistently across campuses in
communication material, including websites, printed material and
physical and electronic signs.
Establish an ambassador program, which would be a crucial grassroots
component of effective communications. Peer ambassadors would share
Healthy IU information with their schools or workplaces and provide a
conduit for feedback concerning employee needs.
Create branded social media accounts and strategy for maintaining them,
targeting audiences and collaborating with other social media specialists
across the campuses.
Create a communication plan that can be consistently implemented
across the campuses using a task force drawn from the Healthy IU
steering committee and subcommittees.
Redesign the Healthy IU website to make it mobile friendly and so that it
can better feature videos and other multimedia.
Distribute branded items to ID role models (T-shirts, water bottles,
buttons). This can be done by ambassadors, the communication
specialist, wellness committees and service providers.
Timing
Short
Impact
High
New or Expansion
Expanded
Short
High
Expanded
Short
High
New
Mid
High
New
Short
High
Expanded
Mid
Medium
New
Mid
Medium
Expanded
Short
Low
Expanded
H i g h P r i o r i t y O b j e c t i v e s t o b e I m p l e m en te d
by August 2015
1. Expand the Diabetes Prevention Program to all campuses
2. Implement enhancements to the built environment which both
promote and remove barriers related to physical activity
a. Mark 1, 3 and 5 mile routes with way finders on each
campus
b. Install signage to encourage stair use
3. Expand healthier food & beverage options on all campuses
4. Continue Steering Committee with special attention toward
mental well-being.
5. Expand Marketing & Communications
Additional Objectives to be
I m p l e m ent ed b y A u g u s t , 2 0 1 5
Short or Mid Term Program Components
Cross promote mental well-being services through Organizational
Development/Healthy IU/Work-Life.
Address Awareness of Mental Well-being during health screenings with
links to self-assessment and resources.
Promote EAP mental health screenings and services
Provide stress management programs on all campuses
Integrate Healthy IU physical activity efforts into academic efforts
Create free or subsidized self-directed physical activity opportunities
Update screening staff on new cardiovascular risk guidelines
Expand health screening resource materials (packet) to include
information and resources on signs and symptoms of mental illness,
stroke, heart attack , BP, cholesterol, PA, glucose, work/life, nutrition.
Provide American Heart Association health risk assessment link in post
screening e-mail.
Create a map of BP machine locations and post on web & screening
resource booklet.
To mark change in employee health and well-being, reassess
health/wellbeing of IU employees using the Fairbanks Study in spring
2015.
Ensure strategic planning committees at the campus and university
wide level employee well-being and/or quality of life are addressed.
Ensure all communications are provided at a 6th to-8th grade reading
level. Modify message to engage unique constituents where possible.
Impact
New or Expansion of
existing
Medium
Expanded
Medium
New
High
High
High
High
High
Expanded
Expanded
Expanded
Expanded
Expanded
Low
Expanded
High
Expanded
Low
Expanded
High
Expanded
Medium
New
High
New
Ad d i t i o n a l O b j e c t i v e s t o b e
I m p l e m ent ed b y A u g u s t , 2 0 1 5
New or Expansion
Impact
of existing
Short or Mid Term Program Components
Clarify employee wellness participation time allowance parameters. (on work time,
Medium
on personal time, on work and personal time, supervisor permission.)
New
Promote the benefits of healthy employees with supervisor and managers. And
Medium
provide flexible work schedule policy awareness, education and utilization support.
New
Develop “healthy meetings guidelines” for foods and physical activity based on
Reach Healthy Communities program Healthy Meeting Guidelines
New
Low
Establish an ambassador program, which would be a crucial grassroots component
of effective communications. Peer ambassadors would share Healthy IU
High
information with their schools or workplaces and provide a conduit for feedback
concerning employee needs.
Enhance the tobacco free culture with expanded awareness, education and
High
counseling .
Encourage recruitment, admissions and student services to raise awareness about
Medium
the tobacco free campus .
Establish a common healthy foods definition for all university campuses, we
recommend: “A healthy food is a plant or animal product that provides essential Low
nutrients and energy to sustain growth, health, and life while satiating hunger.”
New
Expanded
New
New
Pe r f o r man c e M e t r i c s

Workplace Wellness Follow-up Survey
via Fairbanks School of Public Health

Program Specific Performance
 Participation
 Customer Service Survey
 Measured Health Outcome

IU Bloomington Evaluation
 Student Evaluation of pilot programs
example: fit bit pilot through the IUB
School of Public Health

Benchmark and track Healthy IU
progress using CDC Scorecard and
similar tools such as Healthiest
Employers in Indiana or Indiana
Chambers’ Workplace Wellness
assessments.

Compare participation rates and program
scope with other Big Ten Universities.
“Participants typically improve
their eating habits during and
after the DPP program but have
trouble staying active”, instructor
Gina Plummer said.
“The trackers motivated people
dramatically,” she said. “Some
continued to lose more weight
as a result of using the trackers.
They called them the ‘silent
Ginas’ since they no longer had
me with them during the weekly
core program, but now they had
the trackers.”

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