Seven Deadly Wastes Workshop

Report
The Seven Deadly Wastes
Course Objectives
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
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Learn what the Seven Deadly Wastes
are and how they affect our business.
Identify the Waste in our business and
develop an action plan to eliminate it.
Develop an action plan to teach others
what the Seven Deadly Wastes are and
how to eliminate them.
First – The History Lesson

Have you heard of Mass Production?
This method of production was brought
to the forefront with Henry Ford’s
invention of the automobile.
Skilled
Craftsmanship
1900’s
Mass Production
1930’s
Lean
Manufacturing
1960’s
TODAY
Dr. Deming Enters the Scene
Following WWII, the lean manufacturing
approach was developed by American
Dr. Edward Deming, to assist the
Japanese economy in rebuilding from
the impacts of war. The scarcity of raw
materials provided the basic premise for
lean manufacturing, i.e., use what is on
hand in the most efficient manner.
Great Cars from Japan?
How were the first cars from Japan
viewed?
How are cars from Japan viewed
today?
Welcome the age of Lean
Manufacturing.
The Toyota Production System
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In the early 1960’s TPS was pioneered
by Taiichi Ohno to reflect the
philosophies of waste elimination and
time management
Highly skilled “work cell” jobs
Emphasis on quality and efficiency
TPS Top Three
1.
2.
3.
The team must embrace a philosophy
of having zero tolerance for waste
Activity on a daily basis is focused on
creating a stable production
environment.
Systems are set up to create
customer “Pull” or Just-in-Time
Delivery
Zero Tolerance For Waste
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All unnecessary waste can be
eliminated
Stated simply, the goal is perfection
Stable Production Environment
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The highest quality product can only be
achieved in a stable environment.
Problems are instabilities that must be
surfaced quickly and solved permanently
Standardization, consistency and
predictability and repeatability are the
goals. Improve from there!
Customer Pull/JIT Delivery


A product should only be built to meet
customers demands. Build only what
the customer wants, deliver it when it is
expected and with perfect quality
This approach results in the best use of
the company’s resources, which leads to
greater profitability
Let’s get into the Waste
What are you willing to pay
for?
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
Dough, Sauce, Toppings, Toppings dropped
on the floor, Labor cost for delivery driver,
Labor cost for delivery driver to stop at
girlfriend’s house on the way?
What are our customer’s willing to pay for?
VALUE ADDED ACTIVITY
Value Added Activity
Value is added to a product when it changes
the fundamental nature of the product.
Examples:

Stamping a bracket out of a coil of steel
All other activities are non-value added or
waste
And here they are . . .
WASTE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Overproduction
Inventory
Transportation
Waiting
Motion
Over Processing
Correction or Rework
Overproduction
Overproduction is making more of
something than the customer requested
Examples:


Running a machine for 16 hours
when only 10 are required
Making 2 day’s worth of product
when only 1 day’s worth is required
Inventory
Inventory waste occurs when there is
more product on hand than the
customer requested.
Examples:


More raw material than needed for
smooth production
More work-in-process
Transportation
Transportation waste is moving the
product more than is necessary
Examples:


Having three storage locations for the
same material
Moving raw materials to an offsite
warehouse
Waiting
Anytime value cannot be added because
of a delay is defined as the waste of
waiting
Examples:



Waiting for material
Waiting for a machine to be fixed
Unbalanced assembly sequence
Motion
The waste of motion refers to any extra
movement of the operator when they are
performing the work sequence (excessive or
repetitive motion also increases ergonomic
issues)
Examples:


Walking 10 feet to retrieve a part or tool
Twisting around to grab a part in the back
of the workstation
Overprocessing
Over processing is doing more to the
product than the customer requested
Examples:


Plating a product for four hours when
only two are required
Testing a product three times when
the specification calls for one test
Correction/Rework
Anything that is not “done right the first time”
and requires rework inspection or touchup
(Also includes scrap and appearance issues )
Examples:



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Re-torquing a bolt
Sorting incoming materials
Checking a key dimension
Trimming thread or flash from a
component
Waste in my cell!!
Transportation
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Correction
Overproduction
Waiting
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Over Processing
Motion
Inventory
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Action Plan for Eliminating
Waste and Teaching Others
1.
2.
3.
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5.
Discuss this with my coach.

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